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MPENTER 

/ FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of the 
Unifed Brofherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 







mmmumtdiAmm^Smti 



fef FRED LUDWIG teii 



you 




hQW UPSON 
KUVER'KRAK PANELS 
solved the tratked 
telling problem In 
his own home 

FRED H. LUDWIG, President Merritt 
Lumber Yards, Inc., Reading, Pa., former 
president National Retail Lumber Dealers 
Association, nationally known merchan- 
diser of quality building materials, writes: 
"The reason that I used Upson Kuver- 
Krak Panels in the living room and library 
of my own residence was brought about 
by the great difficulty I had with the 
plaster cracking. 

"Having the faith in Upson Panels, 
developed through the many years that 
we've handled your products, prompted 
me to use it and once and for aH, get rid 
of further failures. 

"I am glad to report to you that these 
panels have been very satisfactory and 
have done everything that we expected 
them to do." 



Above: Mr. Ludwig's living room with an Upaon-panelled 
ceiling. Right: One of the showplaces of eastern Pennsyl- 
vania, the residence of Mr. Ludwig at Wyomisaing. 



Like Fred Ludwig, thou- 
sands of lumber dealers 
and thousands of carpen- 
ters will tell you there's 
nothing like Upson Panels 
for re-covering cracked 
ceilings. 

ntail ihis 



THE UPSON COMPANY 

5312 Upson Point, Loelcporl, N.Y. 

I am interested in knowing more about Upson Strong-Bilt 
Panels □ Kuver-Krak Panels D- Send me a free copy of your 
booklet — "New Interiors For Old." 



covpon todayi 



^: 





KIAMF 








TYPF OF BtlSINFRS 








.<;trfft 








CITY 


STATE 





Do off tdeiejokittite^ 

with this Cummins 

POWER TOOL COMBINATION 



If you were to buy oil the power tools, with independent 
motor drives, that you'd need to do all the jobs 
illustrated here, it would cost you in excess of $350.00. 
For only $176.00 you can buy this new and amazing 
Cummins Combination of power tools, consisting of 
Cummins Model 600 Portable Saw the power unit, 
Cummins Model 630 4" Belt Sander and Cummiris 
Model 640 Planer. In your shop or. on the job site 
these tools will save you money . . , they will do 
all these jobs faster, better, easier. Write today for 
complete details. You will be gidd you did. 




SAWING 





DOOR PLANING 



BEVEL PLANING 



SURFACE PLANING 



Bwy T/i/s GTea\ Deal Today for Only $176.00. See Your Hardware, Woodworking or 

Industrial Supply Jobber. 

IL THIS COUPON TODAY! 




MAI 





Model 

640 

Planer 

$6400 



CUMMINS MODEL 600 SAW 
THE POWER UNIT 

Cuts \V»' deep in wood. Base adjusts 
for depth and bevel cuts. At 45° cuts 
through lumber 1 %" thick. Compact and 
light. Weighs only 1 1 lbs. Has conven- 
tional equipment with 6" combination 
saw blade. 

Name „„ 



CUMMINS MODEL 630 
SANDING UNIT 

Mounts to Cummins Model 600.-Saw as 
shown. Standard 4' x 27" belts insure 
fast, efficient sanding. Quick, easy ad- 
iustment for removing and replacing 
belts and for centering belts on pulleys. 
With saw mounted, unit weighs 1 8 lbs. 

Address 



Occupation , City. 



CUMMINS MODEL 640 
PLANER UNIT 

Mounts to Cummins Model 600 Saw as 
shown. Removes up to Yie" of stock in 
one cut. Adjustable for depth of cut. 
Equipped with bevel attochment. Cutter- 
head is 4" wide with removable blades. 
With sow mounted, unit weighs 20 lbs. 



Zone State. 



CUMMINS PORTABLE TOOLS 

DIVISION OF CUMMINS BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION 

4740 NORTH RAVENSWOOD AVENUE • CHICAGO 40, ILLINOIS 

Over 60 Years of Precision Manufacture 





TnC^M^NTEE 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

PET£R E. TERZICK, Editor 
Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana 

Established in 1881 
Vol. LXX— No. 1 



INDIANAPOLIS, JANUARY, 1950 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Content s — 



We Are Growing Stronger 



Much of the economic strength of the United States stems from the fact that more 
and more of our people are entering the working force. Whereas only 35 per cent of 
our people held down jobs in 1890, nearly 42 per cent of all the people are now gain- 
fully employed. Naturally, the more people there are at work, the more goods the 
nation can turn out. 



The Problem Of Old-Age Security 



A famous economist— never noted for his liberal views— takes a look at the problem 
of providing security for our old people and comes to the conclusion that an adequate 
Social Security program is the best answer. A really thorough analysis of the whole 
old-age security question. 



Twin Cities Lay Corner Stone 



18 



The General Officers, present in St. Paul to attend the recent convention of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, help the Twin Cities District Council lay the corner stone of 
their new building; thus bringing to reality a thirty year old dream. 

21 

The year 1949 saw many weird accidents take place — many of them so unusual as 
to be funny— to everyone, that is, except the victims. The moral Is that on or off the job 
no man or woman can be too careful. 



Moral: Safety Pays 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 
The Locker 
Official 
Editorials - 
In Memoriam 
Correspondence 
To the Ladies 
Craft Problems 



16 

20 
23 
24 
29 
31 
38 
40 



Index to Advertisers - 



47 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3. 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 



Get the practical training you need 

jmmsm^^fimfor PROMOTION, 

INCREASED INCOME 

Prepare now for more pay, greater success. 
Hundreds have quickly advanced to foreman, 
superintendent, inspector, estimator, contrac- 
tor, witli this Chicago Tech training in Build- 
ing. Your practical experience aids your suc- 
cess. 

I. earn how to lay out and run building jobs, read 
blue prints, estimate building costs, superintend con- 
struction. Practical training with complete blue print 
plans and specifications — same as used by superin- 
tendents and contractors. Over 45 years of experi- 
ence in training practical builders. 




FREE 



Blue Prints 
and Trial Lesson 



THOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

Learn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you 
that the way to the top-pay jobs and 
success in Building is to get thorough 
knowledge of blue prints, building con- 
struction and estimating. 

In this Chicago Tech Course, you learn to 
read blue prints — the universal language of 
the builder — and understand specifications — 
for all types of buildings. 

You learn building construction details : 
foundations, walls, roofs, windows and doors, 
arches, stairs, etc. 

You learn how to lay out work and direct 
building jobs from start to finish. Tou learn 
to estimate building costs quick- 
ly and accurately. Find out 
how you can prepare at home 
for the higher-paid jobs in 
Building, or your own success- 
ful contracting business. Get the 
facts about this income-boosting 
Chicago Tech training now. 



Send today for Trial Lesson: "How to Read 
Blue Prints," and set of Blue Print Plans — 
sent to you Free. See for yourself how this 
Chicago Tech course prepares you to earn 
more money, gives you the thorough knowl- 
edge of Building required for the higher-up 
jobs and higher pay. Don't delay. Mail the 
coupon today in an envelope or use penny 
postcard. 



MAIL COUPON NOW 



n 



Chicago Technical Collesre 

A-122 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 16, III. 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet : 
"How to Read Blue Prints" with information 
about how I can train at home. 

Name Age .... 




Address 



I Occupation 

City Zone. 



State 



CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



Carpenters— Here are low-cost 
ALL-METAL fronts for wood cabinets 



/. 




Olympia Fronteer Cabinet Fronts are factory-made, 
heavy gauge metal frames, doors and drawers fully 
assembled and finished in gleaming white baked 
enamel. With them any carpenter can build cabinets 
that combine the luxury and strength of metal -with 
the flexibihty of wood. All he need do is erect a set of 
shelves and attach the fronts \'.'ith wood screws. Shelves 
can be any dspth from narrow strips between studding 
to deep storage shelves under attic eaves. The base 
cabinet fronts have metal drawers with ball-bearing 
rollers running on steel roller tracks for easy operation 
and long wear. Equipped with semi-concealed chrom- 
ium hinges. Wonderful for inside v,-inter jobs. 

THEY FIT 
ANYWHERE! 
k 



SEND 
FOR OUR 
CATALOG 




FINEST QUALITY... UNION MADE 



fronteer cabinet fronts 



WESTERN METALCRAFT, INC. 

OLYMPIA, WASH. 

Please send descriptive Uterature giving sizes, styles and prices 
of Olympia Cabinet Fronts — no obligation. 

2same 



Address . 
Cit\ 



, State . 




$T£AdyyEAR 'ROUNP WORK- 
SANP NEW AND OtP FLOORS 

Look into the money-making possibilities of start- 
ing a floor sanding business — if you want steady 
and pleasant indoor work — a good substantial in- 
come with earnings of $25 and more a day — an 
opportunity to operate as a sub-contractor in new 
construction and as a separate business man when 
you sand older homes. 

No experience or special schooling needed — 
Sanders are easy to operate — you can start sanding 
floors and make money the first day your machines 
arrive. Prospects everywhere — new and old homes. 
No large investment — the overhead is low and you 
need no elaborate oflices, workshop, storeroom or 
trucking equipment. Many men operate from their 
own home and use a regular passenger car to 
transport their equipment from job to job. 

Thousands of men have been successful in the 
floor surfacing business. You let the machine do 
the work. It's pleasant inside work and usually the 
buildings have some heat. No ladders or scaffolding 
to climb. A business that can bring you a lot of 
satisfaction and steady money! Send today for 
"money-making" booklet entitled "Opportunities 
in Floor Surfacing" — use coupon and enclose 2 5c 
in coin or stamps to cover handling. The American 
Floor Surfacing Machine Co., Toledo, Ohio. 



A Big Operator 

Ben W. Kenaey, 
veteran floorman 
of Kansas City, 
Mo,, started years 
ago in floor sand- 
ing and has stead- 
ily expanded this 
■-■ business. Today, 
Ben and Forest C. Kenney op- 
erate the Acme Floor Co. with 
a total of 19 American Floor 
Sanders, Spinner Edgers, and 
Polishers. 

A One-Man Business 

£d Clanin lives in a 
Michigan city of 
20,000. He has an 
American Floor 
Sander and an 
American Spinner 
for the edges, dos- ^ 
ets and stairs and 
also an American Maintenance 
Machine for disc sanding, steel 
wooling and polishing. He av- 
erages 75 to 100 floor jobs per 
year. 



MERICAN 

L FLOOR MACHINES 

Stnd Coupon Today! 



The American Floor Surfacing 

Machine Co., 
520 So. St. Clair St., Toledo, Ohio 

• Enclosed find 25c in stamps or 
coin for booklet "Opportunities in 
Floor Surfacing", telling me how I 
can start my own floor sanding bus- 
iness. 



Name. 
I Street. 



City, 



.State, 



Looking straight down on the back edge 
you see the perfect taper grind of 
every Disston Hand Saw. Blade 
thicker at butt. 



Looking straight 
back at the point 
edge you see 
the perfect up- 
ward taper 
grind of every 
Disston Hand 
Saw. Thicker at 
the tooth edge. 




Looking straight down on the tooth edge you see the gauge of the steel 
from the butt to the point. All the way, the tooth edge is SAME WIDTH. 



.SiD%?l^ TRUE TAPER GRIND 

adds speedy ease^^ accu racy 



DfSSrON.. .The Saw Most Carpenters Use 

is perfectly taper ground, as explained 
above, to help you do your smoothest, 
fastest, truest sawing — to help you save 
time and material. Furthermore, this is 
the saw made of Disston Steel — Disston- 



controlled to give you the flex and 
balance you want . . . hardened and 
tempered to make the edge last longer. 
There are Disston types and 
sizes for all your work. See Your 
Hardware Retailer. 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC., 104 lacony, Philadelphia 35, Pa.. U.S.A. 

/n Canada, wrife: 2-20 Fraser Ave., Toronto 3, Ont. 





In spare time 

with the 

FOLEY LAWN MOWER SHARPENER 

"I have sharpened over 10.000 mowers in my Foley Lawn 
Mower Sharpener in the last 10 years — only repairs needed 
were new belts"— Charles H. Smith. From Ralph Band— 
"The first month's business paid for my machine." The Foley 
Bharpens all sizes and types of mowers in 15 or 20 minutes 
(with handles on). Prices run from $1.50 to 
, $2.00 for hand mowers, and $5.00 to $3.00 
for power mowers. This is the way to make 
money 1 

Prices $98.50 to $139.50 

EASY PAYMENTS — Put a new 1930 mod- 
el Foley Lawn Mower Sharpener In your shop 

that will handle all hand and power mowers. 

99c out of each dollar you take in is profit. 

FREE PLAN shows how to start — mail cou- 
pon today! 



Send for FREE PLAN 



FOLEY MFG. CO., 101-0 Foley BIdg., Minneapolis 18, Minn. 

Send FREE PLAN on the Foley Lawn Mower Sharp- 
ening business. 

Name 

Address 




HANDIEST CARPENTER RULE MADE... 
LUFKIN TWO WAY-RED END No. 966 

* Measures Left to Right— Right to Left 

* Patented solid brass lock joints 

* Solid brass mountings, strike plates 

* Enameled snow white, gloss red ends 

* Folding end hook is optional 

Write Dept. C for fascinating booklet, "The Amaz» 
ing Story of Measurement". Enclose 10c (no stamps) 
for handling and mailing. 



^UFKIN 



THE LUFKIN RULE CO. • TAPES • RULES • PRECISION TOOLS 
SAGINAW, MICHIGAN • NEW YORK CITY • BARRIE, ONT. 



We Are Growing Stronger 

• 

ONE OF THE great elements of underlying strength in the American 
economy has been the fact that over the years the labor force has 
grown faster than has the population as a whole, according to an 
analysis of oflBcial Government data. 

It is this expansion in the labor force combined with its increased pro- 
ductivity that have been basic factors in the nation's remarkable progress and 
in tlie steady rise in American living standards. Output per man hour has been 
increasing at an average rate of about 2 per cent a year for several generations. 

While the labor force will continue 



to grow, its size has apparently stab- 
ilized in relation to the population as 
a whole. This introduces a new ele- 
ment in American life of significant 
economic implications. 

The labor force includes all those 
gainfully employed, whether for them- 
selves or working for others. It is 
therefore the productive part of our 
society, and the source of the where- 
withal to meet e\'eryday living needs 
and all the other charges placed on 
the economy. These charges have 
been rising rapidly. They already 
represent a heavy burden now, and 
their cost will increase greatly in the 
years to come without a single new 
addition. 

With a stabilized labor force, the 
full responsibility of meeting our 
expanding obligations is automatical- 
ly thrown upon increased productiv- 
ity. People will have to work harder 
and more efiiciently. For unless pro- 
ductivity continues to grow at least as 
much as it has in the past, the na- 
tion's future commitments will have 
to be met at the expense of curtailed 
individual consumption, which means 
reduced living standards. 



On an overall basis, the labor force 
rose from a total of 22.2 millions in 
1890 to an estimated 62.3 millions 
this year, a rise of 181 per cent. In 
this period the total population in- 
creased from 62.9 millions to 149.2 
millions as of July last year, a rise 
of 137 per cent. Thus the figures 
show that the labor force increased 
nearly a third more than did the 
whole population in the last 60 
years. 



60 Years 


of Growth 


The following 


table compares the 


trends of the pc 


pulation and labor 


forces growtli (in 


milhons) and their 


relationships from 


1890 to the pres- 


ent: 






Ratio, Labor 




Labor Force to 


Year Population 


Force Population 


1890 62.9 


22.2 35.3% 


1900 76.0 


28.4 37.4 


1920 105.7 


40.7 38.5 


1930 122.8 


47.6 38.8 


1940 131.7 


55.1 41.9 


1949 149.2 


62.3 41.8 


Source: Bureau of 


Labor Statistics; Bu- 


reau of the Census. 



However, if the figures are taken 
decade by decade since 1890, it is 
found that the labor force this year 
showed only the same percentage 
increase over the 1940 figure as did 



THE CARPENTER 



the population as a whole. Each 
showed a rise of 13 per cent, the 
first time in the last 60 years that 
the population has matched the la- 
bor force growth in any decade. 

It is true that the recent war did 
bring an exception, as it brought so 
many other distortions to the econ- 
omy in general. Reflecting the na- 
tion's enormous manpower needs, the 
labor force broke away from the nor- 
mal trend and reached a record high 
above 66 million in 1945. However, 
much of this reflected the huge size 
of the armed forces, and most of the 
rest an abnormally large number of 
teen agers and elderly men and wo- 
men over 65 who entered the labor 
force. In the last four years, though, 
the size of the labor force has shrunk 
about 4 million to a level somewhat 
above 62 million, or more in line with 
normal trends. 

Over the long term, there has been 
a definite downtrend in the propor- 
tion of youngsters of school age and 
persons of 65 and over in the labor 
force. Barring unforeseen contingen- 
cies, authorities expect these trends 
to prevail in the future. With respect 
to "oldsters" of retirement age, their 
withdrawal from the labor force will 
undoubtedly be accelerated by plans 
to expand Social Security benefits and 



the growth of the pension movement 
in private industry. 

As to the future size and rate of 
growth of the labor force, the Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics recently made 
this forecast: 

"In the first half of the 1950's, when 
the small generation born during the 
mid-1930's will be entering working 
age, there will be a sharp slump in 
labor force growth. The average an- 
nual increase of about 400,000 (with- 
out immigration) will be lower, ab- 
solutely and percentagewise, than 
in any comparable preiod in recent 
years. 

"In the late 1950's the bumper crop 
of babies born during and immediate- 
ly after World War II will begin to 
move into the labor force. Labor- 
force entries will therefore rise, prob- 
ably reaching their peak in the early 
1960's, when an average annual in- 
crease of about 800,000 workers is 
expected. Even at this level, how- 
ever, the increments to the labor 
force will be smaller on a percent- 
age basis than during the depression 
decade of the 1930's. 

"After 1965 the rate of labor-force 
growth is expected to turn down- 
ward again, on the assumption of a 
decline birth rate in the years im- 
mediately ahead." 



SANTA ANA LOCAL FURNISHES LABOR LIBRARY 

A reference library of books on labor unions, labor relations and tlie history of the labor 
movement in tlie United States has been presented to Orange Coast College by Local 1815 
of the Carpenters Union, located in Santa Ana, Cal. 

The collection, including many books which are now out of print, has been assembled 
by tlie Orange county institution's library staff and purchased by the union. Selection and 
purchase of the books has taken since last spring. 

The union's offer was made when tlie college library staff asked for assistance in obtain- 
ing information about labor unions for a course in industrial organization and labor rela- 
tions being taught by R. D. Boyce. 

The Santa Ana local provided a list of reference books on tlie subject. An expanded 
offer was later made when the union determined to offer a series of scholarships to high 
school students on the basis of an examination on labor relations. 

The library at Orange Coast college is to be available to high school students compet- 
ing for tlie scholarships. Selection of tlie books was made by members of the college social 
science department, including Boyce, Dr. Giles T. Brown, chairman of the department and 
Miles W. Eaton. 



The Problem of Old-Age Security 

An analysis of four present approaches 
to a solution that so far has evaded us. 

By SUMNER H. SLIGHTER, Harvard Economist 
* * 

LESS THAN half of the men and less than one out of ten of the women 
of sixty-five years of age or over in the United States are at work. A 
man of sixty-five years of age may expect to live on the average about 
twelve years longer; a women nearly fourteen years. How are people going 
to support themselves for twelve or fourteen years without working? An an- 
nuity paying $100 a month for life, if purchased at the age of 65, would cost 
more than $15,000. If it also provided a payment of $75 a month to a wife 
who survived her husband and who was about the same age as the husband, 
it would cost several thousand dollars more. Few persons who reach the age 
of 65 have savings of $15, 000 or more. Consequently, the voluntary savings 
of individuals can meet only a small part of the need. How retired workers 
shall be supported is plainly one of the biggest economic problems in the 
United States. 



What should be done about the 
problem of security in old age? Is 
the problem being made unneces- 
sarily large and diSicult by unwise 
retirement policies on the part of 
business? How good are the four 
principal ways through which the 
country is now attempting to meet 
the problem— employer-initiated pen- 
sion plans, union-negotiated plans, 
the Federal old-age assistance plan, 
and the Federal old-age pension 
plan? Do these plans need to be 
supplemented or superseded by new 
arrangements? In particular, how 
good are the pension plans that have 
been negotiated by trade unions? 
The fact-finding board in the steel 
case said that so long as the gov- 
ernment fails to provide security 
in "an adequate amount, industry 
should take up the slack." Is this 
reasonable? Are union-negotiated 
plans a good way of meeting the 
problem of old-age security? 

The house of Representatives has 
passed a bill extending the Federal 
old-age pension plan to at least 6 



million more persons and raising the 
monthly benefits by roughly 70 per 
cent. How far would these changes 
go in meeting the problem of old- 
age security? 

The seriousness of the problem 
of old-age security is greatly ag- 
gravated by the unwise retirement 
policies of business. Few people 
retire voluntarily— most retirements 
occur against the will of the work- 
er at the decision of the employer. 
The community obviously would be 
better off if the older persons who 
were willing to work had jobs and 
were producing goods. Furthermore, 
most persons would be happier at 
work than they are in retirement. 
Special reasons for early retirement 
exist, it is true, in the case of exec- 
utives, technicians and professional 
people, who hold jobs that require 
imagination, originality and resource- 
fulness. These jobs are best held by 
relatively young men. 

For the great majority of jobs, how- 
ever, the age of 65 is too early for 
retirement. Hence, the growing prac- 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



tice of retiring all persons at the age 
of 65 should be decisively halted. 
Had the rule of retirement at 65 been 
generally in effect in August, 1949, 3 
million fewer people would have been 
at work in the United States, and the 
annual output of the economy would 
have been nearly $11 billion less— 
except to the extent that the drop- 
ping of older workers might have 
raised the efficiency of younger work- 
ers. 

Although a higher retirement age 
would cut down the problem of old- 
age security it would not eliminate 
the problem. Even at the age of 70 
the average male may expect to live 
nine years longer. An annuity of $100 
a month for life at the age of 70 
would cost him in excess of $13,000— 
certainly more than the average 
worker of 70 would have. Let us look, 
therefore, at the four principal ways 
which are now used to provide retired 
workers with incomes and let us see 
whether any of them offers a solution 
for the problem. 

1. Employer-Initiated Plans 

These plans have been growing by 
leaps aijd bounds— from fewer than 
200 in 1915 to more than 400 in 1929 
and more than 9,000 today. In the 
last ten years their growth has been 
greatly stimulated by the tax laws. 
More than three-fifths of the employ- 
er-initiated plans are non-contribu- 
tory. Most of the plans were started in 
order to permit firms to make some 
overdue retirements. Under the cir- 
cumstances, managements were hard- 
ly able to ask employes to contribute. 

Pension plans initiated by private 
employers have four major deficien- 
cies, and they are clearly not the an- 
swer to the problem of old-age securi- 
ty—though they may do much good 
in the plants where they operate. 
A primary major deficiency for em- 
ployer-initiated pension plans is that 



they will never give adequate cover- 
age. One reason for this is that they 
do not apply to self-employed per- 
sons, of whom there are about 11 mil- 
lion in the United States. They need 
a source of income after retirement 
no less than do employes. 

Employer-initiated pension plans al- 
so fail to give adequate coverage be- 
cause they are expensive. Hence, only 
the more prosperous companies will 
adopt them. Even in the highly pros- 
perous year of 1945 more than one- 
fourth of all corporations were "in 
the red." Pensions, depending upon 
their size, are likely to cost at least 
6 to 8 per cent of payrolls. This does 
not include the special cost of meet- 
ing the large accrued liability with 
which most pension plans start. This 
special cost is a result of the fact that 
the plans apply to employes who 
have worked for the employer for 
many years and who will soon have 
reached the age of retirement. No 
payments have been made before the 
initiation of the scheme to buy pen- 
sions for these employes. 

F i n a 1 ly , the employer-initiated 
plans will not give adequate cover- 
age because they are limited to cer- 
tain types of employes— usually long- 
service employes. The present 9,000 
employer-initiated plans cover a little 
more than one-third of the employes 
of the firms which have the plans. 

A second major shortcoming of em- 
ployer-initiated pension schemes is 
that they may be abandoned at the 
will of the employer, leaving the 
employe without protection. Of 418 
plans in existence in 1929, forty-five 
had been abandoned by 1932. 

A third major defect of most em- 
ployer-initiated pension schemes is 
that they restrict the movement of 
workers— a man who leaves one em- 
ployer to work for another does not 
ordinarily carry his pension rights 
with him. 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



A fourth major defect is the handi- 
cap they put on older workers in find- 
ing employment. This deficiency is a 
result of the third one; namely, that 
employes do not carry their pension 
rights from one employer to another. 
Even twenty years' contributions on 
behalf of a worker will not buy him 
a very adequate pension unless these 
contributions are at a high rate. Con- 
sequently, a man who is hired at the 
age of 55 and retired at the age of 65 
or 68 would receive a very small pen- 
sion. 

Managements do not care to under- 
mine the morale of their workers by 
giving substandard pensions to em- 
ployes who are retired, and they avoid 
this difficulty simply by not taking 
workers of more than about 45 years 
of age except for temporary jobs. 

2. Union-Negotiated Plans 

Pension plans negotiated by unions 
with employers may be less easily 
abandoned than an employer-initiated 
plan and they may cover a larger pro- 
portion of the employes, but they suf- 
fer from the same four major defects 
as do employer-initiated plans. Con- 
sequently, it was a blunder for the 
fact-finding board in the steel dispute 
to recommend union-negotiated plans 
for the various steel companies. 

Union-negotiated plans will never 
give adequate coverage, partly be- 
cause they do not apply to the self- 
employed and partly because they 
can be instituted only in those plants 
where the employer is making enough 
money so that he can grant the union 
demand for pensions, meet the large 
accrued liability, and hold his own 
in competition. No matter how strong 
the union, it cannot impose an ade- 
quate pension plan on those employ- 
ers who are financially weak. The 
limitation of coverage is especially 
great when the cost of pensions falls 
entirely on the employer. Conse- 



quently, if union-negotiated plans are 
established, the workers should con- 
tribute part of the cost. 

The union-negotiated pension plans 
which have been established thus far 
do not, as a rule, permit an employe 
who leaves an enterprise to carry his 
pension rights with him to his next 
job— though some of the stronger un- 
ions may be able to correct this defect 
by negotiating changes in the plans. 
Union-negotiated pension plans, like 
employer-initiated plans, discourage 
employers from hiring older workers 
and thus handicap older workers in 
finding jobs. 

A special drawback of many union- 
negotiated pension plans is their fi- 
nancial unsoundness. Many of these 
plans make no provision for meeting 
the huge accrued liability with which 
the plans start. In many cases the 
cost of the pensions in a decade or so 
will be so large that the unions will 
have to consent to a reduction in the 
pensions in order to gain wage in- 
creases. Consequently, the so-called 
"security" oflFered by many union- 
negotiated pension plans is illusory. 

The pension fund in the coal in- 
dustry is a glaring example of an ar- 
rangement which provides illusory 
security because it is financially un- 
sound. No adequate provision has 
been made to finance the enormous 
accrued liability with which the 
scheme started. Nor has the under- 
writing of the risks been arranged to 
assure that any part of the payments 
now being made into the fund will be 
available to provide pensions ten or 
twenty years hence for the men who 
are today counting on getting pensions 
when they retire. An insurance 
company which attempted to operate 
as the miners' welfare fund is being 
operated would quickly be in trouble 
with the law. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



3. Old-Age Assistance 

The old-age assistance program of 
the Federal Government is the largest 
single source of income to retired 
persons. About 2.6 million are draw- 
ing old-age assistance payments and 
this is roughly twice as large a.s all of 
the pension payments made under the 
Federal old-age pension scheme. More 
than half the money now disbursed 
for old-age assistance comes from the 
Federal Government, but administra- 
tion is in the hands of the states. 

The old-age assistance program is 
open to two major objections. One is 
that it is demoralizing and the other 
is that it opens the door to grave pol- 
itical abuses. It is demoralizing for 
people to have to accept charity after 
a lifetime of work. And since the 
money comes from general revenues, 
recipients of aid do not have the sat- 
isfaction of knowing that they have 
made a specific contribution to help 
finance the payments which they re- 
ceive. 

The fact that payments are based 
upon a means test makes the plan 
difficult to administer. Need is difficult 
to defii:ve, and this creates the danger 
of political favoritism. The danger is 
aggravated by the fact that payments 
are made out of general revenue and 
that most of the states, which admin- 
ister the scheme, are paying out more 
Federal money than state money. 

During the last ten years the record 
of old-age assistance strongly suggests 
that such a scheme cannot be satis- 
factorily administered. Although un- 
employment (which tends to be es- 
pecially high among older persons) 
dropped from 9.5 million in 1939 to 
2.1 million in 1948, payments for old- 
age assistance increased 2.7 times. 
There are wide differences between 
states in the proportion of persons re- 
ceiving aid, and there are wide varia- 
tions in average monthly payments 



even between adjoining states. In 
Louisiana no less than four out of five 
persons of 65 years of age or more are 
receiving old-age assistance— a sudden 
doubling of the number since June, 
1948. 

In Oklahoma and Georgia more 
than half, and in Texas, Colorado, 
Alabama and Mississippi nearly half 
of all persons 65 years of age or over 
are drawing old-age assistance, but 
in New York and New Jersey the pro- 
portion is only one out or ten. 

Wide variation also occurs in the 
size of payments. In Louisiana the 
average monthly payment has more 
than doubled between June, 1948, 
and June, 1949, rising from $22.87 to 
$47.05. In the two adjoining states of 
Arkansas and Mississippi the average 
monthly payment in June, 1949, was 
$20.95 and $18.80, respectively. 
Monthly payments in Massachusetts 
were nearly twice as large as in Ver- 
mont and one-third again as large as 
in Rhode Island. 

4. Old-Age Insurance 

The most satisfactory arrangement 
for providing income for retired per- 
sons is the Federal old-age insurance 
plan. It avoids the principal weak- 
nesses of the other three schemes. In 
the first place, it is comprehensive, for 
it covers all jobs in all plants within 
the covered industries. It is not limit- 
ed to the generous and prosperous 
employers or to the plants where un- 
ions are strong. In the second place, 
it gives enduring protection because 
it cannot be abrogated at the will of 
an employer, and employes do not 
lose their pension rights if their em- 
ployer goes out of business. In the 
third place, since employes carry their 
pension rights with them, the plan 
does not deter employers from hiring 
older workers. 

In the fourth place, the burden on 
financially weak employers is limited 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



by the fast that the plan appHes aUke 
to all competitors m an industry, by 
the fact that the accrued liability is 
met very gradually (as is possible only 
under a compulsory system), and by 
the fact that half of the cost falls on 
employes. In the fifth place, the self- 
respect of the workers is protected 
because pensions are given as a matter 
of right without a means test and are 
financed, not from general revenues, 
but from a payroll tax to which both 
employes and employers contribute 
equally. Finally, the fact that pensions 
are paid as a matter of right elimi- 
nates the chance for political favor- 
itism. 

Although the Federal old-age in- 
surance scheme is basically sound, it 
has three serious defects— its coverage 
is inadequte, its eligibility require- 
ments are too strict, and the benefit 
payments are too low. The coverage 
is inadequate because the plan does 
not cover certain important types of 
domestic servants, employes of non- 
profit institutions, farm employes and 
the self-employed. All in all, it covers 
about three out of five jobs. The eli- 
gibility requirements are too strict- 
it takes too long for workers to ac- 
quire insured status. As a result, only 
about one out of five persons of 65 
years of age or more is drawing pen- 
sion benefits or has insured status 
under the plan. The low benefit pay- 
ments are indicated by the fact that 
the average payment for single work- 
ers is about $26 a month and for a 
worker with one dependent, about 
$40 a month. 

A comprehensive and adequate old- 
age insurance plan is the only way of 
checking the rapidly snowballing old- 
age assistance payments. The useful- 
ness of the Federal old-age pension 
plan in relieving the community of 
dependence on unsound alternative 
arrangements will depend upon ade- 
quacy of benefit payments. Surely it 



is not unreasonable that the pension 
of a man with a wife to support should 
be at least half of his earnings before 
retirement. In case of a man who has 
been earning $300 a month through- 
out his working life, the recommenda- 
tions of the Advisory Council would 
result in a monthly pension of $106.87 
—a little more than one-third of his 
monthly earnings. 

Although the Federal old-age pen- 
sion plan can be easily developed to 
provide adequate protection to retired 
workers, some employers and some 
unions may wish to establish supple- 
mentary plans. The Federal Govern- 
ment, however, has an obligation to 
see that supplementary plans really 
provide the security which they prom- 
ise, that they do not tie a worker to a 
given employer, and that they do not 
encourage employers to discriminate 
against older workers. 

This can be done by requiring that 
the plan meet certain standards in 
order for employer contributions to 
be a deductible expense under the 
corporate income, tax law. These 
standards should require that the plan 
be properly underwritten and that the 
employes who leave the service of an 
employer take their pension rights 
with them. In addition, in order to 
avoid encouraging noncontributory 
plans in preference to contributory, 
the Federal Government should per- 
mit the contributions of employes to 
pension plans to be a deductible ex- 
penditure under the personal income 
tax— at least if the employe's contri- 
bution is matched by one from his 

employer. 

* >ii * 

Can the Country afford an ade- 
quate scheme of security for old 
age? With stiff wage demands con- 
stantly being made on industry, with 
large quantities of goods needed for 
national defense and to provide help 
to sixteen countries in Europe, can 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



industry produce enough to give de- 
cent pensions to retired workers? And 
are not all schemes by which the 
community undertakes to provide se- 
curity for retired workers wrong in 
principle? Are not such schemes 
bound to undermine thrift, initiative, 
self-reliance, and the spirit of inde- 
pendence? 

The cost of an old-age pension plan 
paying benefits moderately more lib- 
eral than those included in the bill 
recently passed by the House or re- 
commended by the Advisory Coun- 
cil on Social Security may be put 
roughly at 8 per cent of payrolls. In 
the past, output per man-hour in the 
United States has increased about 2 
per cent a year. If it continues to grow 
at the rate of 2 per cent a year, it will 
increase by over 80 per cent in the 
next thirty years. 

Hence, the total cost of a fairly ade- 
quate old-age security program would 
be about one-tenth the increase in 
production during the next genera- 
tion—assuming that output per man- 
hour grows no faster than in the past. 
The one thing that must be avoided, 
in order to keep the cost of old-age 
security within moderate limits, is a 
further drop in the usual age of re- 
tirement. Universal retirement at 65, 
depriving the community of nearly 
$11 billion of products a year, would 
be ten times as costly as the present 
old-age pension program is today. 

The danger that a system of old- 
age security will undermine thrift is 
remote. The usual method by which 
men have provided for their old age 
has never been thrift— it has been by 
having plenty of children and expect- 
ing the children to help the parents. 
Certainly pensions which pay 50 per 
cent more or less than average earn- 
ings leave much room for thrift. Fur- 
thermore, no one need fear that the 
incentives to practice thrift are about 
to disappear— there are many good 



things which the ordinary person can 
acquire only by practicing thrift quite 
rigorously. Any wage-earner who 
buys a house at present prices will 
have a good opportunity to be thrifty 
for years to come. 

Nor is old-age security likely to 
undermine initiative, self-reliance and 
independence— it is likely to strength- 
en these qualities. The reason is ob- 
vious. The worker, small-business 
man or high executive who has a 
minimum of protection for his old 
age is likely to be willing to take 
some economic chances which he 
would not otherwise dare take. The 
extension of old-age security to small- 
business men may be particularly use- 
ful in making them feel better able 
to take risks. Certainly if the pros- 
pect of a pension is likely to under- 
mine initiative or self-reliance this 
probability has been overlooked by 
the many corporations which have 
provided generous noncontributory 
pensions for their executives— the very 
men who most of all need to have 
initiative and self-reliance. 

One final word of warning. The 
greatest danger to an adequate old- 
age security plan is rising prices. A 
rise of 2 per cent a year in prices 
would cut the purchasing power of 
pensions about 45 per cent in thirty 
years. The greatest danger of rising 
prices is from wages rising faster 
than output per man-hour. If unions 
put up money wages 5 per cent a 
year and output per man-hour in- 
creased 3 per cent a year, prices will 
have to rise by the difference, or 2 
per cent a year. Hence, whether the 
nation succeeds in providing ade- 
quate security for retired workers de- 
pends in a large measure upon the 
wage policies of trade unions. If 
unions push up wages faster than 
output increases, they undermine the 
security of all retired workers. 



15 



Gov. Warren Frees Four 

* * 

GOVERNOR EARL WARREN of California on December 2nd com- 
muted to time served the sentences of John H. Bundte, WilHam 
Philhps, Jr., George M. Sherrard, and Robert E. Moore, who were 
convicted on charges growing out of an outbreak of "violence" during the long 
and bitter lumber strike in the Redwood territory. The four lumber workers 
were convicted of rioting and given six months in the county jail. They were 
also convicted of assault with intent to do bodily harm, for which they were 
sentenced to prison terms to be served upon completion of the county jail 
terms. The county jail sentences expired December 5th, so by the Governor's 
action, the men were given their liberty in time to enjoy Christmas with their 
families. 

In announcing the commutations, the Governor said: 

"These men have all been good citizens of their community over a period 
of years. They are family men, and with one exception, they have never been 
in any serious dilBculty with the law in their lives. They are working men 
and they have been vouched for by their clergymen, by business men in the 
region, and by neighbors and fellow workers. They have been punished by 
six months in jail and I do not believe that they will again be in conflict with 
the law. It would, therefore, serve no good purpose to break up their homes 
and further imprison them." 

The conviction of the four lumber workers was the outgrowth of a rock- 
throwing incident which occurred on the picket line near Willits, California. 
As a truck loaded with unfair lumber approached the picket line in February 
1947, nerves worn raw by the bitterness of the strike snapped. Rocks began to 
fly. At least one rock allegedly hit the truck driver. The four union members 
were singled out for arrest from among a sizeable group of people present. 
Their trials aroused considerable interest not only in the county but through- 
out much of the Pacific Coast area as well. Despite valiant efforts by Union 
attorneys, the four men received prison terms in addition to county jail terms 
—treatment which appeared to be unduly harsh to many people both in and 
out of the labor movement. 

Nevertheless, all union appeals clear up to the Supreme Court failed to 
reverse the sentences. 

However, by his charity and benevolence. Governor Warren brought the 
matter to a happy ending in time for Christmas. Through his commutation 
order, the four men were restored to their families and "finis" was written to 
an unfortunate incident that all concerned are anxious to forget. 



SIP 



SOMETHING BAFFLING 

As a result of a recent study, a medical 
journal announces that jealousy is the mo- 
tive behind a vast majority of the mur- 
ders in which women shoot their husbands 
greatly on the increase). 

It sounds quite logical; but what is ex- 
tremely difficult to understand is a wife's 
jealousy when you see the newspaper por- 
trait of her husband. 

• * • 

WHAT FOR? 

A financial magazine announces Uncle 
Sam is seriously considering printing more 
of the higher denominations of currency. 

As a working stiff who has to fight to- 
day's high prices, our reaction can best be 
illustrated by telling the story of the young 
Boston attorney. Fresh out of law school, 
the attorney was spending most of his 
time trying to appear busy and prosper- 
ous. As he was leaving for lunch one day 
he attached to his door a neatly marked 
card announcing: 

"Will Be Back In An Hour." 

On his return he found that some rival 
had inscribed underneath: "What For?" 




29. -ggPZB- © 1949 (^A.IiL ^ 



If it's pro-labor, I'll go! But if it's 
anti-labor — nix!" 



A NEAT SYSTEM 

With practically all of China now in the 
hands of the Reds, a great hue and cry 
has gone up as to what our policy toward 
that unhappy country should be. Many are 
in favor of recognizing the new regime, 
and about as many are violently opposed 
to the idea. From where we sit it looks 
hke six of one and half a dozen of the 
other. Either way we stand to come out 
on the short end. To our way of thinking, 
the best \vay to deal vnih all communism 
e\'er\^vhere is to keep our own country 
strong and prosperous and to heck with 
what the Reds are doing in China or Rou- 
mania or Ameroosia. Sooner or later they 
will break their picks because it is as na- 
tural for a man to want to be free as it 
is for him to breathe. 

AnyM'ay, for some reason or other, we 
keep tliinking about the old African plan- 
tation owner in this connection. After spend- 
ing many years in the jungle, the plantation 
owner finally received a visit from a New 
Yorker. The first evening there was quite 
a drinking bout before everyone retired. 
The New Yorker dropped right off to sleep, 
but in a short while was awakened by a 
swarm of buzzing mosquitos. Unable to 
endure their tortures, he arose and hunted 
up the houseboy. 

"I want a mosquito net," he said. 

"We don't have any," replied the ser\'ant. 

"You don't!" asked the startled visitor. 
"How does your master stand it?" 

"Well," replied the houseboy, "the first 
part of the night he is so drunk the mos- 
quitos don't bother him and the rest of 
the night they are so drunk he doesn't 
bother them." 

¥ ^ ■¥■ 

ANOTHER PAIN THAT NEEDS CURING 

According to the Sole Leather Bureau, 
sore feet cost Americans something hke 
six million dollars a year in absenteeism 
lowered efficiency and accidents. Proper 
shoes, says the Bureau, will eliminate most 
foot pains. 

Maybe so. But only repeal will cure 
the pain in the neck passage of the Taft- 
Hartley Law gave all tliinking workers in 
tlie nation. 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



PAUP'S OBSERVATIONS ON WOMEN 

Careful Woman: One who loses only 
one glove. 

Woman's Intuition: Suspicion that clicked. 

Gold Digger: A woman who falls in love 
at purse sight. 

Middle-aged Lady: A build in a girdled 
cage. 

Modem Girl: One who sticks by the spin- 
ning wheel— until her chips give out. 

Nag: A woman who has no horse sense. 

Ladies' Sewing Circle: A gathering in 
which more husbands are darned than 
socks. 

Stenographer: Girl working on her MRS 
degree. 

Wife: A continual buzzing in the ear. 

Woman Who Doesn't Play Bridge: Fu- 
gitive from the chin gang. 

Waitress: Girl who thinks money grows 
on trays. 

* • * 

SAD BUT TRUE 

There once was a lad not unique, 

Who imagined himself quite a shique, 

But the girls didn't fall 

For the fellow at all. 

For he made only thirty a vdque. 

• • • 

FROM ONE PHILOSOPHER 
TO ANOTHER 

"Happiness is the greatest desire of man- 
kind," says a famous English philosopher 
in his newest book. 

To which Joe Paup replies, "What good 
is happiness? It can't buy you money." 

^ -¥■ -¥■ 

A LITTLE BIT DECEIVING 

Recent figures reveal that lobbyists for 
Big Business now out-number members of 
Congress by about three to one. W. Brooke 
Graves who compiled the figures was 
amused by the numerous protestations 
made by lobbyists that they were not 
really lobbyists but merely registered as 
such "just in case." "It would appear," 
he wrote, "that all of them sit in their 
offices or in their hotel rooms and medi- 
tate, thinking pure thoughts." 

Could be, but we doubt it. With all 
tlieir protestations of innocence, lobbyists 
sort of remind us of the mother who was 
entertainin a friend. 

"What a sweet and innocent-looking face 
your little girl has," the visitor remarked. 

"I hadn't noticed," the mother answered 
anxiously. "Mary, what mischief have you 
been up to now?" 



YOU NEVER CAN TELL 

Editors once considered a man biting a 
dog the ultimate in newsworthiness. How- 
ever, since passage of the Taft-Hartley Law, 
a new yardstick has been set up for per- 
fection in a news story. The other day it 
actually came about; the National Laboi 
Relations Board and General Counsel Den- 
ham for once agreed. The surprise was so 
great it brought to mind a favorite old 
story: 

A wife was greatly concerned when her 
ailing husband won a sweepstake ticket 
for $150,000. Feeling that the shock might 
prove too great a strain on her husband's 
heart she called the family physician to 
ask his advice. After some consideration 
the doctor decided that he should go down 
to the lucky man's place of business and 
break the good news and at the same time 
be prepared to administer aid should the 
surprise prove too great for the winner. 
When the doctor entered the little store 
something like the following took place: 

Doctor: "Hello, John! What would you 
do if on this bright Fall day someone were 
to tell you that you had hit the Irish 
Sweepstakes for $150,000?" 

Lucky Man: "Well, Doc, you have al- 
ways been a good friend. I believe if that 
were to happen I would give you $75,000." 

Then the Doctor dropped dead. 




"We're playing that union team to- 
day, so I'm going to picket our goal 
line." 



18 



TWIN CITIES LAY CORNER STONE 



Ox RAYMOND Avenue and Bradford in the Cit}- of St. Paul finishing 
touches were recently applied to a beautiful new SSO.OOO building. 
Looking at it one sees a fine example of functional modem architec- 
ture combining reinforced concrete construction w'ith. mellow 'Winona facing. 
But the realh" important components that went into the completion of the 
building do not show. They are thirt}' years of planning and dreaming and 
scheming;: for this is the new home of the Twin Cities District Council. 




Wielding the trowel like a veteran bricklayer. General President William L, Hutcheson 
lays the corner stone of the new Twin Cities District Council home as J. H. Bakken. council 
Secretary-Treasurer i right and L, F. Krengel. business agent, watch hii technique. 

E\'er since the Council was organized thirt}" odd years ago the officers and 
members looked forward to the day when they could occupy a building they 
could call their o^\'n. It took hundreds of committee meetings and thousands 
of hours planning and a considerable amount of financial sacrifice to do the 
job but it has been done. 

On Saturday, October IsL General President ^^'illiam L. Hutcheson. in the 
presence of all General Officers, General Executive Board Members, and a 
larsie number of officers and members of the council, laid the comer stone of 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



the new building. The General Officers were in St. Paul attending the AFL 
convention. Sealed in the corner stone was a copper box containing a list of 
officers and delegates to the council, current working agreements, copies of 
minutes, and many other items which will give some future generation an 
accurate picture of conditions surrounding the carpenters of the area today. 

Short speeches by General Presi- 
dent Hutcheson and General Sec- 
retary Emeritus Frank Duffy sum- 
marized the long, hard road which 
not only the Twin Cities District 
Council, but the entire United 
Brotherhood as well, traveled to 
achieve the conditions and wages 
that carpenters enjoy today. Many 
other important guests were intro- 
duced and all commended the 
council for the fighting spirit they 
have always displayed; a symbol 
of which is their fine new home. 




The two veteran "war horses" of the United 
Brotherhood, General President Hutcheson and 
General Secretary Emeritus Duflfy are snapped 
by the cameraman in front of the newly laid 
corner stone. 



The building is fifty-four by six- 
ty-five feet. In addition to a main 
meeting hall, it has six private 
offices, a conference room, fire- 
proof vault, and many other fea- 
tures designed to add comfort and efficiency. Best of all, the building is, ex- 
cept for a few minor odds and ends, entirely paid for and owned by the council 
and its affiliates. 

Two days following the laying of the corner stone, the Twin Cities District 
Council tendered a banquet to the General Officers of the United Brother- 
hood who were in St. Paul attending the annual convention of the x\merican 
Federation of Labor. It was the first time in many, many years that the entire 
roster of General Officers had been in St. Paul at the same time. The banquet 
was held at the Lowry Hotel. Despite atrocious weather, some 150 odd guests 
were in attendance. Good food and short but inspiring speeches by a number 

of the honored guests made the occasion a memorable one. 

• 

ORNBURN, LABEL LEADER AND SHOW FOUNDER, IS DEAD 

The man who made American AFL union label conscious is dead. 

Ira M. Ornburn, 60, secretary-treasurer of the AFL Union Label Trades Department 
since 1934 and founder of the gigantic annual "Union Industries Show," succumbed Dec. 
17 at the Cornwall, N. Y., Hospital. He entered the hospital after suffering a stroke and 
was ill two weeks. 

The tall, friendly, urbane Mr. Ornburn acliieved prominence in several fields during a 
busy life, but it was his promotion of the union label which won him world-wide attention 
and the admiration here at home of rank-and-file workers who stood to gain most by bigger 
markets for union-made goods and services. 

Mr. Ornburn was born in Moberly, Mo. He moved as a young man to New Haven, 
Conn., where he worked as a cigar maker. He was a member of the Cigarmakers' Inter- 
national Union, served as its vice-president from 1918 to 1926, president from 1926 to 1936, 
and since 1918 was one of the union's delegates to the annual AFL comention. 

Mr. Ornburn was elected secretary-treasmrer of the AFL Union Label Trades Depart- 
ment by tlie 1934 AFL convention. 



THE LOCKER 

By JOHN HART, Local Union 366, New York, N. Y. 

This issue of The Locker contains a series of diversified questions closely or remotely 
related to the trade. From various sources we gather this is M'hat most readers prefer. If 
you score the full 500 points let us know^ about it and we'll make room for your bust in the 
Carpenters' Hall of Fame. If you need the answers, you'll find them on page 30. 



PLANE GEOMETRY 

1. When the time is two o'clock, what degree angle do the hands make? 5 

2. A triangle has sides, 9, 12, 15. Which figure is the hypotenuse? 20 

3. Take 5 points for each parallelogram you can name 20 

4. One angle of a triangle is 60°. The second is 30°. What is the third? 10 

5. How many sides has a dodecagon 25 

ARCHITECTURE 

6. Name the city and country where each of the following famous buildings 

is located. The Louvre (5) (5). St. Mark's Cathedral (5) 

(5). The Taj Mahal (5) (5). The Parthenon (5) 

(5). The Alhambra (5) (5) 50 

7. Sculpture which projects slightly from the surface as on a coin is called 

what? Intaglio scagliola bas-relief _ .marquetry fresco. 25 

8. Which column is the simplest in style? Corinthian Doric Ionic 15 

9. What part of a building is generally termed the facade? 10 

10. A detached, free-standing bell tower is architecturally termed a minaret 

peristyle campanile cupola belvedere. 20 

GENERAL BUILDING 

11. If you know what a batter wall is you're good for 15 points 15 

12. Do you know what a bench mark is used for in a building? 5 

13. What mechanic in the building trade gets paid for pointing? 10 

14. What tools does a bricklayer use when chasing a wall? 5 

15. Whereabouts on a building would you look for a quoin? 25 

CARPENTRY 

16. How many shoulders has a bareface tenon? 25 

17. When a door has a frieze rail where is it located? 15 

18. What part of a lock is the cap? 5 

19. If you know what center-matched sheathing is take an easy 20 points 20 

20. Name a two-handled tool a carpenter uses by pulling towards him 10 

HARDWARE 

21. What is a holdfast? 10 

22. Where and for what purpose is a panic bolt used? 20 

23. Which of these is called an invisible hinge? Bommer, Rixson, Soss, Olive. _ 25 

24. How does a dowel screw differ from an ordinary screw? 20 

25. What is meant by a dead lock? 10 

MENTAL ARITHMETIC (put your pencil away) 

26. The perimeter of a room is 60 feet. The length is twice the width. What 

are the dimensions of the room? 25 

27. A carpenter charges 12 cents for sawing a board into two lengths. How 

much should he charge for sawing it into six lengths? 5 

28. How many s. ft. in a room 27 feet wide and 33 feet 4 inches long? 25 

29. In a Local of 480 members, 24 are apprentices. What percentage of the 

total membership are apprentices? 10 

30. How many square inches difference between 2 square ft. and 2 feet square? 15 

Total points 500 
THE 64 DOLLAR QUESTION 

A ten inch phonograph record has a blank inner space four inches in diameter. The 

blank outer margin is one-half inch wide. How far does the needle travel when tlie record 
is fully played? An approximate answer will be considered correct. 



21 



MORAL: Safety Pays 

• • 

SO LITTLE ALICE thought things were wacky in Wonderland! She 
should have stuck around and seen what the National Safety Council 
dug up in 1949 in its annual roundup of odd accidents. To wit: 
Every ballplayer dreams of the day he's as hot as a firecracker. But few 
attain it as literally as Outfielder Norman Lawrence of an East Oakland, 
Calif., sandlot team. Thirteen-year-old Norman chased a fly ball so vigorously 
that the friction of his pants ignited some matches in his pocket. The matches 
touched off a pocketful of firecrack 



ers Norm had been hoarding. He 
banged his way spectacularly across 
the outfield and caught the fly— to 
the thunderous cheers of his amazed 
and delighted teammates. 

In the same anatomical category 
is the fascinating case of Ivan Har- 
zell of Yreka, Calif., who gave not 
a hotfoot but a hotseat to, of all peo- 
ple, himself. Mr. Harzell was work- 
ing in a field with a sodium chlorate 
weed killer that impregnated his 
trousers. The highly inflammable 
chemical was touched off by friction 
when Mr. Harzell rammed his hand 
into his pocket, and his pants ex- 
ploded. 

Statistics show that very few cars 
skid on icy streets in New York City 
in midsummer. But that's what hap- 
pened on the hottest day of the year 
in 1949. A taxicab driven by Arthur 
Irise crashed into another taxi. Irise 
explained to police that his cab had 
skidded on ice that had fallen from 
a truck. He was advised to put on 
chains. 

Mrs. Lowell Long is used to hear- 
ing her neighbors in Cedar Rapids, 
la., say that her biscuits are always 
surefire. Nonetheless, she was star- 
tled when shots rang out from the 
hot o\ en into which she had just 
dropped a pan of dough. Then she 



remembered that when the family 
left on a recent vacation, two re- 
volvers had been hidden in the 
stove. 

Fully aware that things are tough 
all over, police in Sacramento, Calif., 
ne^'ertheless were surprised to get a 
report that an automobile had picked 
the pocket of a pedestrian and es- 
caped with $102. The victim, W. T. 
Taylor, had walked too close to a 
moving car. His coat pocket— wal- 
let and all— was ripped off by the 
auto and carried away. 

Football fans realize that pretty 
drum majorettes of high school bands 
practically knock themselves out to 
please the crowd. But Celia Slavens 
of the Champaign, 111., high school 
band actually did it. She twirled her 
baton so energetically it smacked her 
in the head and knocked her cold. 

In Bridgeport, Conn., a box of 
cookies set fire to a house at 153 
Charles Street. How? Well, the box 
toppled from a kitchen shelf onto the 
handle of a water faucet, tin-ning on 
the water. The cookies spilled out 
clogging the drain and causing an 
overflow. The water seeped through 
the floor, a short circuit resulted, and 
fire broke out. 

Parents and others who are a little 
weary of bubble gum have an ardent 



22 THE CARPENTER 

ally in Quincy Elmer Fergusson of Then things were really gummed 

Anaheim, Calif. Quincy was driving up. 

a young woman home from the office In Kampsville, 111., Bridegroom 

one afternoon when she chose that James Inman blissfully carried his 

moment to demonstrate her skill as bride across the threshold, slipped 

a gum bubbler. The balloon sized and broke his ankle. 

bubble burst in Quincy's face. He And in Santa Monica, Calif., po- 

did what came naturally— let go of lice arrested a motorist on a speed- 

the wheel and clawed at the rub- ing charge for the second time in 

ber}' goo which covered his eyes. 18 months. His name? No fooling, 

The car swerved into two others, folks— it's Safetv' First! 



1950 HOUSING CENSUS IMPORTANT TO INDUSTRY 



Comprehensive data covering many housing subjects vital to the interest 
of the construction and building industries will be gathered by enumerators 
of the United States Bureau of the Census when they take the Census of 
Housing in April. Preparations have been made to enumerate as many as 45 
million dwelling units compared with 37.3 million units reported in the 1940 
census. 

The Housing Census to be made as part of the 17th Decennial Census 
will be the second nationwide sun'ey of the housing situation by the Census 
Bureau. It will furnish the construction and building industries with new and 
detailed information to replace figures gathered in the 1940 Census of Hous- 
ing and subsequent surveys. 

Since 1940, tremendous shifts in population have occurred in the United 
States, some areas having gained much more heavily than others. These move- 
ments have made it desirable that the Nation be brought up to date on the 
question of where housing is most needed and how much. 

An authoritative and reliable determination of current housing needs can 
be had only by finding out the location of existing units and their character- 
istics, values, rentals, mortgage financing features, and other essential data 
which is obtained on a nationwide scale only by the Census Bureau. 

Builders and building craftsmen, real estate brokers, and mortgage lenders 
depend largely upon housing for their livelihood. Others depend upon hous- 
ing to provide the principal markets for their products— lumber, brick, stone, 
hardware, glass, and paint, to cite a few examples. Mines, mills, forests and 
farms all provide materials for home construction. Producers and retailers of 
stoves, furnaces, electrical appliances, and household furnishings all are 
vitally concerned with new information on potential markets. 

While the interest of public officials and persons in the building industry 
is more acute with respect to the need for new housing, the quality of existing 
units also is of vital importance. In 1940, most users of the housing statistics 
found the data on "state of repair" to be very useful. 

The Census Bureau recognized the fact, however, that "state of repair" 
as reported by an enumerator is conditioned by his abilit\' to judge the kind 
and extent of repairs that a house needs. Nevertheless, the various users of 
such data feel that some measure of housing quality' is highly desirable, par- 
ticularly if it can be provided for their own localities. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

Gbnbbal Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHBSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



FiBST General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Acting Secretary 

ALBERT E. FISCHER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 
First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 

111 B. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, O. WM. BLAIBR 
933 B. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTBL 
3600 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the Acting Secretary 

Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of January, February and March, 
1950, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local 
Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt of 
this circular should notify Albert E. Fischer, Carpenters' Building, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. 



Report of the Delegates to the Forty-first Annual Convention of 

Union Label Trades Department of the American 

Federation of Labor 



To the General Executive Board: 

The Forty-first Annual Convention of the Union Label Trades Department of the 
American Federation of Labor was held in the Windsor Room of the St. Paul Hotel, St. 
Paul, Minnesota on September 30, 1949. One hundred and twenty-one delegates were 
present, representing forty-four National and International Unions. 

The following National and International Unions were represented: 

Delegates 

American Federation of Labor 1 

Bakery and Confectionary Workers' International Union of America 7 

(Continued on page 27) 



Editorial 




Labor At Last Gets A National Voice 

Last month a radio spieler by the name of Fulton Lewis, Jr. created some- 
thing of a sensation when he broadcast a hair-raising story about uranium and 
heavy water and atom bomb secrets being exported to Russia in wholesale 
quantities during the war. No cloak and dagger fiction writer of the modern 
school ever turned out anything more exciting. All the elements of suspense 
were there— bearded Russian villains slinking around U. S, Army property, 
mysterious orders coming from high places, and, most important of all, a boy 
hero stanuding his ground against all sorts of odds. However, that is as it 
should be, for most of Lewis' story tiirned out to be pure fiction too. 

The boy hero in Lewis' spy thriller is a former Air Force officer stationed 
at Great Falls, Montana, during the war. This chap, George R. Jordan by 
name, acted as expediter for lend-lease material flowing to Russia through 
that base. According to Jordan, he saw shipments of uranium ore and other 
vital material being loaded on planes bound for the Russian front. Jordan 
even claimed that he saw Russian officers struggling under carboys of "heavy 
water," an important component in the manufacture of the atom bomb. 
According to his story, he, Jordan, personally stopped a good deal of this 
illegal traffic. 

But Lewis' great "scoop" backfired. A Congressional investigation got 
under way immediately. One by one the charges made by Jordan and aired 
by Lew;s failed to stand up. It was disclosed by General Groves, who was 
the chief in charge of the entire atomic program during the war, that there 
was not a glassful of heavy water in existence at the time Jordan claimed 
Russians were carrying it off in huge carboys. The very fact that Jordan 
claimed the Russians were grunting and groaning under the loads made his 
story sound ridiculous because heavy water is very little different in weight 
from ordinary water. It is designated "heavy" because of its different mole- 
cular structure, and not because of its weight. 

In any event, all the furore created by Lewis went for nothing. News- 
papers have revealed since his sudden rise to notoriety, that Jordan sought 
after the war to set himself as a consultant or "five per center" for persons 
trying to do business with the Russians. Other papers revealed that he tried 
unsuccessfully to peddle his "story" many other places before Lewis finally 
purchased it. 

What was back of the whole thing? Probably Lewis' vindictiveness against 
the present administration and the whole New Deal from its inception in 1933. 
Certainly he was too smart to be taken in by the more fantastic portions of 
Jordan's story. He merely saw in them an opportunity to smear people he 
did not like in Washington. That he made the most of that opportunity is 
evident from the furore created. 



THE CARPENTER 25 

Lewis is an old hand at that sort of thing. Labor often has been on the 
receiving end of his verbal brickbats. More than likely he racked his brains 
trying to cook up an anti-labor angle to his newest spy scare story before he 
broke it. Like a good many of his colleagues, Lewis seems to be more inter- 
ested in sensationalism than in strict truth. 

This latest incident merely emphasizes the fact that organized labor has 
long needed a national radio voice of its own. That voice is now on the air. 
Under the sponsorship of the American Federation of Labor, Frank Edwards, 
long one of the top commentators in the middle west, is now broadcasting 
Monday through Friday over Mutual Broadcasting System. Edwards is no 
slouch as a newscaster. He is forceful, fearless and fair. Most important of all, 
he is free to call his shots as he sees them without fear of offending the Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers or the Chamber of Commerce. Every 
worker who is interested in getting the whole truth in every situation ought 
to make it a habit to listen to Edwards every weekday evening. Consult your 
local newspaper for the time when your local Mutual station will be carrying 
his program. 



No One Likes Snooping 

Every tenth year Uncle Sam undertakes a count of his nieces and nephews. 
This is a census year. Already thousands upon thousands of enumerators 
have started the tremendous task of counting every man, woman, and child 
in our glorious land. In tenament hovels, in backwoods cabins, in swanky 
apartment houses, in remote bayous, in fact wherever people live in this broad 
land, there enumerators will appear sometime this year to gather information 
about our population. 

Something new has been added to this census. Recently the Census Bureau 
announced that one of each five individuals or heads of families will be asked 
certain pertinent questions concerning the size of their incomes. Object of 
these questions will be to gatlier accurate information regarding the living 
standards of the poorer people, especially those whose low earnings exempt 
them from income tax payments. No such questions will be asked of people 
in the $10,000 a year category and above because their income tax reports will 
give all the information needed for government statistics. 

Against this prying into the financial status of part of our citizens, a 
number of Congressmen have raised a great hue and cry. Despite the fact 
all information gathered will be strictly confidential, they charge that the 
questioning constitutes "snooping." In a sense it does. However, so does the 
income tax blank which people in the higher brackets by law must £11 out 
each year. For better or worse, the day when most people could keep their 
financial affairs strictly to themselves flew out the window when the income 
tax law was passed some thirty-five years ago. That people in the very lowest 
income bracket should be afforded a special privilege that is now denied those 
who make enough to pay income taxes seems illogical. 

What we suspect is that the opponents of the idea of gathering financial 
data during the census have an ulterior motive. We are inclined to think that 
they are more concerned with what such financial data would show rather 



26 THE CARPENTER 

than with protecting the privacy of the people. Congress is aheady concerned 
with the economic welfare of our people. A Senate Economic subcommittee 
headed by Senator Sparkman of Alabama has already been deMng into the 
economic status of the American people. Among the things uncovered by this 
subcommittee was considerable evidence pointing to the fact that incomes are 
lowest among tlie unorganized workers who do not have unions to represent 
them in collective bargaining with their employers. A nationwide surv'ey of 
earnings would probably pro\"e this theory ver}' conclusively. Needless to 
say, most of the Congressmen objecting to a further dehing into facts about 
low incomes are Congressmen who seldom vote ^^"ith labor on any matters. 

Figures already published by the Sparkman subcommittee indicate that 
something like eight million individuals and heads of families are now earn- 
ing less than Sl.OOO a year. Something like sixteen milhon have incomes of 
less than 82,000 a }"ear. Obviously this is not a happy situation. Neither is it 
a situation conducive to continued national prosperit\\ Before the problem can 
be attacked intelligently, it is important that as much correct information as 
possible be a\'ailable. Other than the Census Bureau no agency is adequately 
organized to gather the necessar}^ facts and figures. 

No one likes snooping. The less of it there is the better off all concerned 
will be. However, for the bulk of the American people, privacy about income 
disappeared with the ad\"ent of the income tax. If facts and figures are now 
needed concerning the earnings of the lowest income groups, it would only 
seem logical that they should be gathered in the only sure wa}" they can. 
Knowing the facts is always the first step required in remedying any situation. 



An Important Step 

Recently labor representati^"es from \"irtually all the free nations of the 
world met in London to form the International Confederation of Free Trade 
Unions. To say that the democratic cause was thereby strengthened is to in- 
dulge in understatement. Nothing that has taken place since the end of the 
war is of greater significance to working people ever}^vhere who cherish 
personal freedom. 

The International Confederation for the first time gi\'es the democratic 
cause a spring board from which to launch an effective counter-offensive 
against communism. Up to now, all the aid gi\"en to devastated nations 
throughout the world has operated through the governments that existed be- 
fore the war. Sometimes these were corrupt and undemocratic, even though 
anti-communistic. Through the International Confederation, an effective peo- 
ple's voice has been estabhshed— a \-oice really dedicated to democratic prin- 
ciples. 

As that voice is strengthened and nurtured, its effecti\"eness will increase 
and in the long run it will undoubtedly make the greatest contribution to 
the annihilation of all totalitarianism. Human history pro\"es that by his very 
nature man wants to be free. All he needs is a vehicle for achieving that free- 
dom. The International Confederation pro^'ides such a \'ehicle. 



THE CARPENTER 27 

(Continued front page 23) 

Delegates 
Journeymen Barbers, Hairdressers, Cosmetologists and Proprietors' International 

Union of America 3 

International Brotherhood of Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers 1 

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders and Helpers of 

America 3 

International Brotherhood of Bookbinders 2 

Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 5 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 2 

United Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers International Union 4 

International Chemical Workers Union 3 

Cigar Makers International Union of America 3 

Retail Clerks International Association 2 

Coopers' International Union of North America 2 

Distillery, Rectifying and Wine Workers' International Union of America 2 

International Federation of Technical Engineers, Architects and Draftsmen's 

Unions 1 

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers '. 4 

International Union of Operating Engineers 4 

International Photo-Engravers Union of North America 4 

International Brotherhood of Firemen and Oilers 2 

International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union 1 

United Garment Workers of America 5 

Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the United States and Canada 3 

American Flint Glass Workers' Union of North America 1 

International Glove Workers' Union of America 1 

United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers' International Union 1 

Hotel and Restaurant Employes and Bartendars' International Union 1 

Laundry Workers' International Union 3 

Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America 5 

Sheet Metal Workers' International Association 1 

American Federation of Grain Millers 2 

Office Employes' International Union 3 

Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America 3 

International Brotherhood of Paper Makers 1 

United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe 

Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada 1 

Metal Polishers, BuflFers, Platers and Helpers' International Union 1 

National Brotherhood of Operative Potters 2 

International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America 6 

International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers of the 

United States, Canada and Newfoundland 2 

International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes and Moving Picture Ma- 
chine Operators of the United States and Canada 3 

Stove Mounters' International Union of North America S 

International Brotherhood of Teamsters, ChauflFeurs, Warehousemen and 

Helpers of America 5 

United Textile Workers of America 1 

Tobacco Workers International Union 3 

International Typographical Union 6 

Upholsterers' International Union of North America 2 

Total Delegates 121 

The Executive Board in its annual report said in part: 

A year ago there was great uncertainty whether the signs of better times, then apparent, 
were real or illusory, whether the tide of recovery was actually flowing or whether there 
was just a lull in depression. 

Looking at the world as a whole, tlie presence of a general advance is noted. And it 
is hardly the kind of recovery for which most of us have been watching and waiting. 



28 THE CARPENTER 

The world had cherished the hope of returning to "normaUty." Without defining what the 
"normal" condition of affairs might be, the world vaguely imagined a state of things which 
would permit calculation for the future, which would give some assurance that the rhythm 
of economic life would resume an even tenor undisturbed by excessive ups and downs— 
a state of fairly stable equilibrium. This hope has by no means been realized. 

Although much progress has been made, no one feels that stability or equilibrium 
has been attained. At most, what has been achieved is to set the economic machine again 
in motion after a grave disruption and serious dislocation. It is once more moving for- 
ward with more or less momentum and the gathering of speed, but the distance that it 
may be expected to travel remains a matter of conjecture and of anxious speculation. 

What is perhaps more surprising and encouraging is the buoyancy and the tenacity of 
the human spirit. In spite of all the grave calamities through which the world has passed 
and the more than abundant sources of peril which still beset peoples everj'where, hu- 
manity has energetically fought its way onward and upward from the depths of destruction, 
poverty and depression and in an atmosphere of confusion to a point where it can look 
backward with a sense of relief and forward to the task of planning for a better future. 

We are not likely to be deluded by any mirage of permanent prosperity. It Is there- 
fore appropriate we take stock of the whole situation and bend every effort towards rear- 
ing a better-grounded social and economic edifice than that which was shaken to its foun- 
dation in recent years. 

The report also dealt with: Union Label Leagues, Union Label Features, Union Label 
Directory, Radio and Television, Union Label Weeks, Women's Auxiliaries and Union 
Industries Shows. 

The proceedings further show that two international organizations became affiliated with 
the Department, as well as eight newly chartered Union Label Leagues. 

There were sixteen Resolutions submitted which were referred to the various com- 
mittees and were acted upon accordingly by the said convention, dealing with such sub- 
jects as: Universal Label Insignia, Union Label League Affiliation, Union Label, Shop Card 
and Button, Labor Press, The American Federationist, A. F. of L. Weekly News Service 
and Union Industries Shows. 

A very complete and concise report was made with reference to the exhibit at the Cleve- 
land show. This exhibit was one of the largest and occupied one of the most conspicuous 
locations in the huge Public Auditorium in the city of Cleveland, Ohio. 

The ""report of the Executive Board mentions the outstanding exhibit of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America which proved to be very popular. 
Valuable prizes were awarded to the winners by the Carpenters District Council of 
Cleveland, Ohio in a guessing contest— which required on-lookers to estimate the number 
of nails in a transparent plastic barrel. 

The fifth AFL Union Industries Show will be held in the Convention Hall, May 6-13, 
1950 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

All the incumbent officers were elected for the ensuing year, which are as follows: 

Matthew WoU, President 

John J. Mara, First Vice-President 

Joseph McCurdy, Second Vice-President 

James M. Duffy, Third Vice-President 

Herman Winter, Fourth Vice-President 

Dave Beck, Fifth Vice-President 

I. M. Ornburn, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

TED KENNY 

Delegates. 



^n 0itxnnvisctn 



Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live in our memory, 
And will forever more 



%tsii in l^entt 

Th* Editor has been requested to publish the names 
0f the following Brothers who have passed away. 



AUGUST ANDERSON, L. U. 1606, Omaha, 

Nebr. 
N. BAARDSEN, L. U. 740, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CHRIST BECK, L. U. 81, Erie, Pa. 
BRUNO T. BENGTSON, L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
EDWARD BILLASCH, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 
LEON BILLHARZ, 298, New York, N. Y. 
HERMAN BOLLHARDT, 282, Jersey City, N. J. 
GEORGE BROUGHTON, L. U. 322, Niagara 

Falls, N. Y. 
LELAND S. CASHWELL, L. U. 132, Washing. 

ton, D. C. 
DAVID CHAROS, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
J. O. DEBRUIN, L. U. 1683, El Dorado, Ark. 
ALBERT DENTON, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
BRUNO DRYER, L. U. 211, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
STEPHAN EBERLING, L. U. 282, Jersey City, 

N. J. 
CHARLES ERICKSON, L. U. 366 N. Y., N. Y. 
JOHN F. FARRELL, L. U. 608, New York N. Y. 
JOHN FLINTOFF, L. U. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 
GUSTAVE A. FOSBERG, L. U. 2244, Little 

Chute, Wis. 

CHARLES E. FRANCIS, L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
ALEXANDER GALLOWAY, L. U. 1149, San 

Francisco, Calif. 
MICHAEL P. GILLIS, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
RUSSELL GOFF, L. U. 335. Grand Rapids, 

Mich. 

FRANK GOLDEN, L. U. 608, New York, N. Y. 
JOSEPH GOLDIS, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
ARTHUR GREENING, L. U. 322, Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 
P. GREGERSON, L. U. 740, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
JOHN HARKINS, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
WM. F. HATMAN, L. U. 749, Tombstone, Ariz. 
FRED JUST, L. U. 282, Jersey City, N. J. 
JOHN A. KENNEDY, L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
JACOB KEPPEL, L. U. 462, Greensburg, Pa. 
HORACE A. KERSEY, L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
H. KNOSP, L. U. 740, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
JOSEPH KOCH, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

EDWARD KRIEDER, L. U. 584, New Orleans, 
La. 



CARL KULLMANN, L. U. 282, Jersey City, 

N. J. 
JAMES LASH, L. U. 142, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
J. M. LEWIS, L. U. 2061, Austin, Minn. 
T. J. LUCAS, L. U. 875, Panama City, Fl.a 
W. R. MCCULLOUGH, L. U. 1371, Gadsden, 

Ala. 
EDWARD MANDEVILLE, L. U. 801, Woon- 

socket, R. I. 
WALTER MASON, L. U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 
SAMUEL E. MASSON, L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
DAVID MATTICE, L. U. 322, Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 
HANNES MATTSON, L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
D. F. MILLISON, L. U. 268, Sharon, Pa. 
JAMES B. MOGEL, L. U. 1491, Royersford, Pa. 
HY MUENSTERMAN, L. U. 90, Evansville, 

Ind. 
HERMAN OLSEN, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
PAUL A. PANZER, L. U. 824, Muskegon, 

Mich. 
EUGENE PATRY, L. U. 93, Ottawa, Ont., 

Canada 
NILS PETERSON, L. U. 298, New York, N. Y. 
GEORGE PORTER, L. U. 470, Tacoma, Wash. 
MEYER RIFKIN, L. U. 132, Washington, D. C. 
JOHN P. RINK, L. U. 261, Scranton, Pa. 
WILLIAM ROSS Jr., L. U. 298, New York, 

N. Y. 
CHRIS SCHMIDT, L. U. 282, Jersey City, N. J. 
GUSTAVE SCHOBER, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
JOHN SEATER, L. U. 132, Washington, D. C. 
ALBERT SHEARD, L. U. 366, New York, N. Y. 
NATHAN SILVERMAN, L. U. 2288, Los An- 

geles, Cal. 
PETER O. STARK, L. U. 1636, Whiting, Ind. 
TOM SWANSON, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
MORRIS TAUBER, L. U. 608, New York, N. Y. 
HENRY J. THIELE, L. U. 165, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
GEORGE H. THOMAS, L. U. 165, Pittsburgh, 

Pa. 
OLIE H. TYLER, L. U. 132, Washington, D. C. 
CHARLES A. VINTON, L. U. 268, Sharon, Pa. 
ARTHUR WELLS, L. U. 43, Hartford, Conn. 
J. EARL WIEGARD, L. U. 211, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 



30 THE CARPENTER 

ANSWERS TO "THE LOCKER" 

1. 60 degrees, 

2. 15. The hjpotenuse is is the side of a triangle opposite the right angle. 

3. Square. Oblong. Rhombus, Rhomboid. A parallelogram is a four-sided figiire whose 
opposite sides are parallel. A rhombus may be explained as a square \^Tecked out of 
shape. A rhomboid is an oblong similarly distorted, 

4. 90 degrees. The 3 angles of aU triangles always total ISO degrees. 

5. 12. 

6. The Lou^"re— Paris, France. St. Mark's— Venice, Italy. The Taj Mahal— Agra, India. 
The Parthenon— Athens, Greece. The Alhambra— Granada, Spain. The Lou\Te was 
built as a royal palace and is now a museum. St. Mark's Cathedral is of t>-pical B^^zan- 
tine design. The Taj Mahal is a marble tomb, built for a sultan's wife around the 
year 1600. It is considered by many to be the most beautiful building in the world. 
The Parthenon is a former Greek temple built around 438 B. C. Like the Taj Mahal 
this is often cited as the perfection of architecture, and is Doric in st>"le. Tne Alham- 
bra, built around 1300, is t>-pical of Moorish design. 

7. Bas-relief, (pronounced ba-rehef). Meaning low rehef or projection. 

8. Doric. A Doric column generally has no base and the capital has no volutes or fohage. 

9. The principle front or face. 

10. Campanile. The Leaning Tower of Pisa was built as a campanile. The Metropohtan 
tower in New York is copied from St. Mark's campanile in Venice. 

11. A batter wall slopes inward as in a retaining or sea waU. 

12. A bench mark is a permanent check mark usually fixed by instruments. Height meas- 
urements are taken from it while the building is under construction. 

13. Either a mason or bricklayer. Filling in masonn.^ joints is called pointing. 

14. A hammer and cold chisel. A chase in a wall is a groove made to contain a pipe etc. 

15. On the angle of the outside walls. The most usual form of quoin is a stone comer 
block set in a brick building. 

16. One. A bareface tenon has one face flush with the surface of the rail. 

17. Next below the top rail. CommorJy seen on so-called Colonial doors. 

18. The cover plate. The part you remove to change the hand. 

19. Sheathing which has the tongue and groove in the exact center. .Any face of the board 
may, be tiomed up and still have a flush surface. 

20. A drawknife. 

21. A square, pointed spike with a lug on one end. They are driven through the masonr\' 
joints and are commonly vised to secure do\\"nspouts or leaders. 

22. On the exit doors of public buildings. Pressure on a horizontal bar automatically re- 
leases the bolt, providing quick and easy exit, 

23. Soss. It is invisible when the door is closed. 

24. A dowel screw has no head and is threaded on both ends. 

25. A lock without a latch. The dead bolt secmres the door. 

26. 10 feet by 20 feet. The width is one third the length of half the perimeter. This gives 
you 10 ft. Kno\%"ing that you know the rest. 

27. 60 cents. 12 cents a cut for 5 cuts. 

28. 900 s. ft. 33 ft. 4 ins. equals 33^3 feet. 33% is one third of 100. Multiply 2T by 
adding 2 zeros. Divide by 3 and there it is. 

29. 5 per cent. One t\ventieth of the members are apprentices. One twentieth of 100 is 5. 

30. 288 s. ins. 2 s. ft. is 2 s. ft. 2 feet square is 4 s. ft. Tfie difference is 2 s. ft. or 288 s. in. 

The 64 DoUax Question 
This question should be in the Mental Arithmetic section. The space taken up by the 
grooves is 2^2 inches \%ide. From start to finish the needle moves in an almost straight 
line across the width of the grooves. Therefore the answer is 2^ inches. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 
A GRAND GESTURE 

(Reprinted from the St. Louis Labor Tribune) 

A group of "freshmen" members of local unions affiliated with the St. Louis Carpenters 
District Council, is undertaking to raise $1,000 to provide "folding" money for retired "Old 
Grads" who live at the Carpenters Home at Lakeland, Florida. So that every member of 
the ten locals affiliated wdth the Council with its more than 7,000 members may know 
the reason for this fund, here is the story in sequence. 

Last summer the Labor Tribune published a human interest story which later was 
widely reprinted. It concerned Herman Joern, age 85, a retired union Carpenter, who for 
the past ten years has been living at the Carpenters Home at Lakeland, Florida. 

Joern visited St. Louis, attended union meeting, and made the rounds with various 
agents of the Carpenters Council to talk to the men on the job and renew acquaintances 
with some of tlie old-timers with whom he had worked. 

The spry old veteran, who joined the union in its formulative years and underwent the 
struggles, the victories and the defeats which eventually gained the high wages and work- 
ing conditions the younger members who 
came after him are now enjoying, was a 
walking publicity man for the great un- 
ion which takes such good care of its 
members. 

Joern told of the contentment and lei- 
surely existence that several hundred 
members in the sundown of life are hv- 
ing at the magnificent home in Florida. 
They virtually have everything they need 
except ready cash, spending money that 
is. Some of the members have some 
money in the bank and some have other 
minor sources of income, having man- 
aged to save something for the "rainy 
day" through sober, frugal living. Otliers 
were not that fortunate. While some get 
social security in limited amounts, the 
payments are meager because they 
reached the age of retirement in the 
early years of the act. Joern, incidental- 
ly is among tlie fortunate group who can 
jingle coins in their pockets. However, 
there are others who are not in that good 
situation. 

Some weeks ago a group of young- 
sters in the Carpenters organization here 
were discussing Joern and the Lakeland 
"Dick" Adams who is a friend of Joern 
Adams mentioned that 




Labor Tribune Photo 

It was a grand night for the old-timers down at 
the Carpenters Home for retired members at Lake- 
land, Florida, as St. Louis Carpenters tallied up 
gifts to provide the fellows w^ith some "Christmas 
money" for "smokin's" and other items they might 
need. Here's the group with the sizeable stacks of 
"Greenbacks" and silver ready to send to Florida. 
Seated, left to right, are: St. Louis Carpenters 
District Council Agents Roy Krehmeyer and D. 
Richard "Dick" Adams, Pete Singer counting the 
money, and Leo Miller. Standing, left to right, are: 
Carpenters District Business Agents Henry Wein- 
reich and William McDaniel and Secretary-Treas- 
urer Erwin C. Meinert. 



Home with Business Representative D. Richard 
and took him along on his daily routine when he visited the city 
while most of the old-timers at the Home had some source of "folding money" Joern told 
him that there were others who had no cash income whatever. Adams suggested it would 
be a splendid gesture on the part of St. Louis members to raise a purse to help such indi- 
gent old-timers who like to go to town occasionally with a httle cash in their pockets. 



32 THE CARPENTER 

Because he was thoroughly famihar with the personal idios}"ncracies and financial needs 
of brothers at the Home, Joem was contacted bj' Adams and agreed to distribute such a 
fund according to needs and personal directions of his fellow guests. 

A four-man committee consisting of Adams, Leo Miller and Pete Singer, of Local Xo. 
5, and Kenneth Snyder of Local 47, the last three in their 20's and recent graduated 
apprentices, thought it would be a fine gesture to raise a "Idtt^^" for these old timers %vho 
paved the smooth road for them and other yoimgsters in the movement. A goal of $1,000 
was set. Sohcitations were made at some meetings and the response was generous. .Although 
attendance at this time of the year is unusually low because of the proximity" of the holi- 
days, a httle over one-fourth of the" stated objective was reached. At one meeting, 22 mem- 
bers donated S22. 

The committee decided to make its supreme effort at the coming Called Quarterly 
meetings which are held in January- when attendance in some unions is compulsor>'. All 
members of the 10 Carpenter Locals affihated ^^ith tlie St. Louis Carpenters District 
Council who \vt]1 attend these meetings, \^"ill be asked to contribute something, and show 
the old veterans that the younger members are grateful to them for their pioneering. 

From your hoHday donations resen'e a Httle loose change for the old-timers at Lakeland 
and make them aware of the fact that the boys in St. Lotiis remember even the least of 
them in the spirit of true brotherhood. That's the best way of viishing those old-timers 
who have so little time left a "Happy" and "Prosperous" 1950. 

• 

MT. VERNON, N. Y., LOCAL >LAEIKS 60th MILESTONE 

Saturday evening, October 29th. Tvom Hall. Mt. Vernon, New York, was decked out 
in its finest as Local Union No. 493 of that cit\' celebrated the sixtieth anniversary' of its 
founding wth a gala dinner dance. Some 430 members, famihes, and friends were on 
hand to make the event a memorable one. 

It was away back in 1889 that a group of dissatisfied carpenters in the ^■icinit^• decided 
that something should be done about their miserable wages and working conditions. The 
result was formation of a local union. Todav's comparatively fine wages and working con- 
ditions are in a large part the result of that union's efforts; which accounts for the pride 
which all members felt as they celebrated the union's sixtieth birthday. 

Brother Nils Larson acted as toastmaster for the occasion and he did a ven,- credi- 
table job. Charles W. Hanson, president of the New York Cit\" District Council extended 
greetings from the General OfBce as well as from the membership of his council. He also 
paid a nice tribute to the pensioners and their wives who were able to be present. Robert 
Bowker, President of the Westchester County District Council also ex-tended greetings 
and hoped that all locals would eventuallv be able to hold a similar affair. Following a 
splendid- turkev dinner with all the trimmings, dancing was enjoyed until a late hour. 

Chairman Larson thanked entertainment committee members J. Alexander, F. Bates, 
M. J. Warren. J. L. Corcione, J. A. Reinhardt, D. Rose, A. Hamilton. W. Weir, C. T. 
Letson. A. \'acca, R. Barletta, and J. McElroy, as well as S. Nolan, for their fine coopera- 
tion in making the celebration the great success it was. 

• 

PL-EBLO -\L\RKS GOLDEN JUBILEE 

On Sunda}\ September 18th, Local Union No. 362, Pueblo, Colo., celebrated its 
Golden Jubilee with a mammoth barbecue and picnic at Cit}' Park PaviHon. Some 250 
friends, members and guests were on hand to help the union mark the completion of its 
first half centurv of progress. Food and refreshments abounded and if anyone attending 
failed to have a good time it was entirely his own fault. 

Honored guest of the event was Brother Sylvester De Spain, only remaining charter 
member of Local No. 362. As a slight token of appreciation for his long and honorable 
record, Brother DeSpain was presented with an honorarium of Fi£t\' Dollars— a dollar for 
each vear he has been a member of the union. Wilharn Zittle, President of the union, 
acted as master of ceremonies. Guest speaker was R. E. Roberts, General Executive Board 
Member. Following the excellent barbecue, the picture "The Carpenters' Home," pro- 
duced under authorization of the General Executive Board and showing the Lakeland 
home in operation, was presented to the audience which found it extremely interesting. 

Following a program of entertaiimient, dancing was enjoved by young and old until 
midnight. .All departed with a feeHng of well being and a sense of pride in tl^e accom- 
phshments of Local Union No. 362. 



THE CARPENTER 33 

AN UNUSUAL TRIBUTE 
Recently Local Union No. 246, New York City received an unusual letter from Brother 
H. E. Nelson, Recording Secretary of Local Union No. 299, Union City, N. J. Since it 
is self-explanatory it needs no comment and is herewith reprinted in full: 

LOCAL UNION No. 299 
Union City, New Jersey 

Local Union No. 246, 
New York, N. Y. 

Dear Sirs and Brothers: 

We believe this letter is unusual, but it merits the attention of your local. 

The members who are employed by Whitebow on Lever Brothers job at 
Edgewater, N. J. wish to congratulate your local for the manner in which the 
foreman, Brotlier S. P. Afte of 7001 Ridge Boulevard, Brooklyn, is conduct- 
ing the activities of the men on this job. He is familiar with the work and 
keeps a watchfuU eye to see that other trades do not take over work that be- 
longs to our organization. 

We highly recommend him as a square shooter. 

Fraternally yours, 

H. E. Nelson 



EVANSVILLE HONORS ITS APPRENTICES 

To honor the fine group of young men taking apprenticeship training, the Evansville, 
Indiana, Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Committee on the night of August 10 sponsored 
a testmonial dinner at Carpenters Hall. With a host of school officials, management rep- 
resentatives, and officers and members of Local Union No. 90 present, the evening proved 
to be a great success. It is the hope of the committee that this will prove to be the first of 
many similar annual affairs. 

Speakers during the evening included: Ralph Becker, Superintendent of PubUc Instruc- 
tion; Athur Eberlin, Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce; Tom Hutson, Indiana Labor 
Commissioner; Cecil Shuey, United Brotherhood International Representative; and ElUott 
French, Field Supervisor, Bureau of Apprenticeship, U. S. Dept. of Labor. Four grad- 
uating apprentices— Chester Deutsch, W. C. Wink, D. K. Wedeking and A. L. Koester— 
received their journeymen's certificates with appropriate ceremonies. Able speakers, fine 
food and plenty of good fellowship all contributed to the great success of the evening. 



CALGARY LOCAL FETES AFL DELEGATES 

Local Union 1770 of Calgary, Alberta wishes to take this opportunity to thank General 
President William L. Hutcheson for the loan of the films, "This is Our Brotherhood" and 
"Carpenter's Home." 

The pictures were showm on the occasion of a chicken supper given to the Carpenter 
Delegates, and 2nd Vice-President John Stevenson, and Executive Board member Arthur 
Martell who were attending the 64th Annual Convention of the Trades and Labor Con- 
gress of Canada. 

The occasion was marked by the presentation of a Tam-O-Shanter to Vice-President 
John Stevenson, by Brother Muit Charlton, President of Local 1779. The members of Local 
1779 realized that Brother Stevenson would very much appreciate this small symbol of 
his native Scotland, especially when he has been so long removed from such things in his 
land of adoption. 

Vice-President Stevenson and Honorable Humphrey Mitchell, Minister of Labor for 
Canada, gave short addresses before the films were shown. It is the hope of all who saw 
the picture to have it shown to every Local Union in tliis part of Canada. We consider it 
the type of education necessary to cement the bond of fellowship already existing in our 
Brotherhood. Many of the younger members of the Brotherhood may tlius be made to 
reaUze the value of remaining a member in good standing. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



Following the showing of the films, a dance was held to round out the evening. It is the 
belief and hope of aU the members of Local 1779 that all of our guests had a pleasant 
time in Calgary and we wish to see them all again sometime soon. 



CHICAGO BROTHER FINDS ISRAEL UP AND COMING 

Late last summer some fift)--five trade union delegates left Newark Airport for a three 
weeks tour of the world's yoimgest democratic nation— Israel. The trip was made at the 
invitation of Histudrat, IsraeU labor movement. Among the Americans making the trip 
was Brother Charles Holzman, business agent, Local Union No. 1539, Chicago. Upon his 
return to tlie United States, Brother Holzman had a very interesting story to tell of heroic 
eflFort being made by the working people of Israel to build a sohd and democratic nation 
on the American pattern. 

Over ninety per cent of the workers and 
farmers of Israel belong to Histudrat, the 
Israel Federation of Labor, Brother Holzman 
reported. 

In its twenty-five year history Histudrat 
has done a remarkable job of improving 
wages and conditions. Arabs and Jews ahke 
belong to the organization and are eligible 
to hold office. Farmers are likewise ehgible 
to belong. Particularly the Arabs have bene- 
fited through the efforts of the union. From 
virtual slaves working for a few cents a day 
they have been elevated to free and inde- 
pendent union workmen getting from six to 
eight dollars per day. 

According to Brotlier Holzman, Histudrat 
takes fine care of its members. Hospitali- 
zation and sick benefits tide members over 
unfortunate periods. The Union provides 
vocational courses, leadership courses, kinder- 
gartens and elementary schools, and even 
sports clubs. Paid vacations have been estab- 
lished throughout most of industry. Democ- 
racy is the foundationstone of the union. In less than a year, some 280,000 immigrants, 
mostly from European DP camps were integrated into the Israel society. 

Brother Holzman sums up his whole iinpression of Israel in a few words; "The people 
want to build a country as much like the United States as possible." 




Charles Holzman, business agent, Local 
Union No. 1539, Chicago, (left) presents 
a gold plaque to Israeli acting president 
Joseph Shprinzak (right), while a veteran 
of the Israeli army from Motele, Russia, 
the birthplace of president Chaim Weitz- 
man, looks on (center). Shrinzak was for- 
merly secretary of the Israeli Federation - 
of Labor. 



HOUSTON LOCAL PAYS TRIBUTE TO GREAT OLD TIMER 

Local Union No. 213, Houston, Texas, recently paid 
tribute to one of its grand old members who has chalked 
up an emdable record in the labor movement. The member 
so honored was Brother J. H. White. 

Brother White joined the United Brotherhood at the 
age of nineteen at Paducah, Kentucky. That was away 
back in 1904. Since then he has maintained continuous 
membership. Today he is still one of the most active 
union men in the southwest. He works every day and 
keeps up \\ath men who are many years his junior. His 
ad\ice and council on union matters hold the respect 
of all union people in the territory. In a recent letter to 
"The Carpenter," Fred Lucas, Recording Secretary of Local 
No. 213, said of Brother ^^'hite: "Former President J. C. 
Sparks, Sr., joins me in commending Brother White as 
one of the best members of organized labor that we have 
had the pleasure of coming in contact with." 




Brother J. H. WHITE 



THE CARPENTER 



35 



BATTLE CREEK LOCAL AND AUXILIARY HONOR THEIR LONG TIME MEMBERS 

On Saturday, October 29th, in the presence of some 250 members, guests, and friends 
of Carpenters Local No. 871 and Auxihary No. 42, Battle Creek, Mich., a fried chicken 
dinner with all the trimmings was served in Carpenters' Hall. The Hall was decorated in a 
Halloween motif by members of Auxiliary No. 42. At this time, special tribute was paid 
to twenty-two members of Local No. 871 who have held continuous membership for 
twenty years or more, and to six members of Auxiliary No. 42 who have held continuous 
membership for twenty-five years or longer. 

Troy L. Shook, Business Agent and Financial Secretary, acted as Master of Ceremonies 
and presented these members with pins of the United Brotherhood, and pictures of the 
group. Music was fiu-nished for tliose who wanted to dance by a committee composed 
of Brother Charles Holcomb and Brother Ivan Oberg. Party arrangements were made by 
ihe following committees: Local No. 871— Anton Ramon, George Wedig, and Troy Shook; 
Auxiliary No. 42— Mrs. Pauline Eisinger, Mrs. Albert Hickman, and Mrs. Fred Reams. 




Pictured above, seated left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Joe Karlovsky 31 years; Mrs. Rose 
Eager 29 years; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reams 32 years; Mr. and Mrs. Russell Galbreath 30 
years; Ed Willis 32 years; Mr. and Mrs. Ed Eisinger 31 years; Mr. and Mrs. James Mit- 
chell; and Art Jenison 25 years. Standing left to right: Burley Gault 23 years; Glenn Tap- 
pan 22 years; George Spriggs 32 years; Harry Forsythe 33 years; George Dodge 25 years; 
Martin Karlovsky 32 years; Charles Aurand 33 years; Harry Berge 40 years; Troy L. Shook 
21 years; Edward Hansen 29 years; John Frey 23 years; Roy Harlan 31 years; and John 
Fuller 35 years. Two members were not present due to illness: Link A. Fruin 42 years and 
Byran Hoyt 40 years. 




CARPENTERS COME TOUGH 

If any proof is needed that carpenters are rugged, hardy 
individuals. Brother George Amos Rice of Local Union 470, 
Tacoma, Wash., supplies it with the accompanying photo- 
graph. Eighty-one years old and a member of United Broth- 
erhood since 1900, Brother Rice is still an ardent skier. To 
any skier that statement is enough, but to tliose who are not 
acquainted with the waxed boards, it is no exaggeration to say 
that skiing is one of the most rugged sports in existence. When 
e\er anyone will take him, Brother Rice can be found zipping 
down the snowy slopes of Mount Rainier. Now a pensioned 
member. Brother Rice farms four acres of raspberries in tlie 
Puyallup Valley. 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



ILLINOIS CARPENTERS GO BACK TO SCHOOL 

Late in November, some forty representatives of organized labor in Illinois gathered 
at Champaign-Urbana for an intensive two-day conference on central body activities spon- 
sored by tlie Institute of Industrial Relations of the University of IlHnois. Object of tlie 




Carpenters attending the Conference on Central Labor Union Activties at the L^niver- 
sity of Illinois pose with E. L. PhilUps, (left) of the University Institute of Labor and In- 
dustrial Relations. They are: R. H. Hanson, Local No. 181, Chicago; Wm. Archdeacon, 
Local No. 44, Urbana; and Stanley Johnson, Chicago District Counci!, who also ser\'ed as 
consultant to the committee of legislation. 

conference was to study ways and means of increasing the effectiveness of central bodies 
in such important union matters as public relations, community activities, political action, 
labor education, and cooperation with state schools. Several members of the United Brotli- 
erhood were among those attending the sessions. 



SAN RAFAEL DEDICATES BEAUTIFUL NEW HOME 




Some sixt>'-eight years ago a small group of progressi\"e carpenters got together in 
San Rafael, Cal., for tlie purpose of forming a union to combat abominable wages and 



THE CARPENTER 



87 



working conditions that existed at that time. Within a few weeks they recieved their 
charter from the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Through 
booms, depressions, war and peace that local union they founded has expanded and 
grown until today Local Union No. 35 stands as one of the most respected labor organ- 
izations on tlie Pacific Coast. The way was not always easy but the Union never backed 
up. All the original old timers are now gone, but the seeds of unionism they planted are 
still bearing much fruit. 

On Saturday, November 5th, San Rafael Local Union No. 35 reached a monentous 
milestone when it officially dedicated its beautiful new home. Located on Lindaro Street, 
the union's new building is a masterpiece of modern construction. The fact that the 
members turned out to do the work in building it adds considerably to their pride of 
ownership. 

Featuring a meeting hall large enough to seat 600, the home provides every facility 
for efficient conduct of the union's business. 

Opening with a joint meeting of Local Union No. 35 and Ladies Auxiliary, the dedi- 
catory ceremonies got under way at two p. m. Numerous distinguished guests from both 
within and without the ranks of organized labor were on hand to help make the occasion 
a grand success. In the evening a dance was held in the new hall. Free refreshments 
added greatly to the pleasure of all. It was a late hour when the party was over and 
everyone departed proud of Local Union No. 35 and its new home. 



ELGIN, ILL., LOCAL CELEBRATES 50th BIRTHDAY 

Local No. 363, Elgin, Illinois, held a picnic in honor of its 50th Anniversary, September 
17, 1949, at Niss Park, two miles east of Elgin. 

Attendance was near the three hundred mark. Included were friends and guests of the 
organization, which was founded September 4, 1889 by ten charter members, all of whom 
are now deceased. The oldest living member present on this occasion was the elevendi to 
join the organization. He is Henry Krumnfusz residing at 101 So. Liberty Street, Elgin, 111. 
He was introduced and presented with 

a fine black calfskin billfold containing IBHIHHH^ ^1 

a check for $50.00 in behalf of his long 
years of membership. He served as pres- 
ident of the Local for several terms and 
had filled all other offices of the Union 
except that of financial secretary. 

There are also within the organization 
twelve members with thirty or more 
years service, who with Brother Krumn- 
fusz have watched the Union progress to 
shorter working hours, better Labor- 
Management relations, negotiated con- 
tracts, increased wages and the many ad- 
vantages to all labor. The encouraging 

of the apprentice program has resulted in the graduation of approximately fifty Apprentice 
Carpenters within the last three years. Community interests and public welfare have always 
been met with the fullest cooperation by the Union. 

Among the many friends and guests who were present and introduced was George 
Ottens, President of the Illinois State Council of Carpenters, who gave a short address 
commending the Local for its splendid turnout and its prevailing good fellowship, and 
praising the organization for its steady growth and good will. 

Activities of the afternoon included several ball games, horse shoe pitching contests, 
music and singing and other entertainment promoted by Chairman Victor Swanson and 
his committee. Part of the success of the day was a chicken dinner and tlie awarding of 
an attendance prize. 

A colored motion picture was taken of the entire picnic to be shown to members at a 
later meeting. 





WARM SPRINGS AUXILLARY BUILDS COMMUNITY SPIRIT 

The Editor: 

Holiday greetings and best wishes to all Sister Auxiliaries from Ladies Auxiliarj' No. 514, 
Warm Springs, Ore. 

On October 8. 1949, we celebrated our first anniversar>\ There are about 40 members in 
our Auxiliary' and our activities are varied. We meet the 1st and ord Thursday evenings. 
The first is our biisiness meeting and the other our social, preceded by a short business 
session when necessar>". 

On the 4th Saturday night of each month we ser."e a luncheon to the rnen of Local Union 
2941, Lumber and Sa\^Tmll Workers, following their meeting. We usually tr>- to ha\'e some 
form of entertainment for them. 

Being 13 miles from towTi we are fortunate in having a lovely (to usj hall. Shadow Haven, 
built by the men of this sa\^Tnill camp less than a year ago. It is bus>- ever>^ day of the week 
and is headquarters for communit>' acti\ities. 

This past summer our Auxiliary- sponsored a Softball team for its members and they en- 
joyed a most successful season. At present we have a ladies basketball team which we play- 
ers and sponsors hope \%ill enjoy the same success. Besides sponsoring the athletic teams 
we recently voted to sponsor a Cub Scout Pack in conjunction with L. U. 2941, which 
is sponsoring a Boy Scout troop (No. 38; and enjo>ing wonderfiil success as this troop is 
one of the finest in this entire area. 

We gave to the Communit>' Chest and are planning a Christmas program again this 
year, complete with Santa, for the enjo>-ment of all the >"oung and old kids. 

We recently ga%'e a rummage sale, and we have dances, card parties, food baskets, etc. 

The members of Au.xihar>- 514 will enjoy hearing from other AuxiHaries and would 
like a chance to challenge them in a game of basketball. 

' Fraternally, 

Marjories Lewis, Pubhcit>' Chairman. 



SANTA CRUZ LADIES FORM AUXILL\RY 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all Auxiliaries from newlv organized Au\iliar\' No. 532. of Santa Cruz, 
Calif. 

We have 18 charter members. At our first meeting, we initiated 2 members. At the 
present time, we are conducting a membership drive and ui\ite all wi\'es of Carpenters' 
Union No. 829 to join us as members. 

Our first Officers were installed in September who were: President, Irene Combs; 
Vice-President, Lee Polstein: Recording secretar%% Marian Pryor; Financial Secretar>', 
Eunice Raiche; Conductress, Eveh-n Eaton; Warden, Francis Jensen; Trustees, Agatha 
Limandri, C. A. Reis and Jean McMahan. 

We meet the first and third Mondays at the I. O. O. F, Hall in Santa Cruz. After 
each meeting, we ser\"e refreshments to the men of Local 829. 

A Christmas partv will be gi\-en on December 19, 1949. for the famihes of Carpenters' 
Local 829. 

We would enjoy hearing from Sister Auxiliaries and would appreciate any helpful 
suggestions they could give us. 

Fraternally, 

Marian Pr."or, Recording Secretary 



THE CARPENTER 89 

SANTA MONICA AUXILIARY GROWING FAST 

The Editor: 

This is our first communication with our Sister organizations. 

We were organized last April, the Van Nuys Auxiliary having conducted the installation. 

Our Auxiliary is now a fast-growing and active group with 45 members. 

In August, we had a lovely picnic at Lake Enchanto. On October 29, we held our 
first annual Bazaar and dinner, which was a grand success, giving us a lot of assurance 
and confidence. 

We meet every second and fourth Friday at the Local hall. The second meeting of 
the month is followed by some social activity. We feel we are very fortunate in having 
some very musical talent in our group which has provided a lot of entertainment. 

The men of our Local 1400 have done so much to make a real Auxiliary group for us. 

A glance into the Crystal Ball tells us of much work to be done in the coming year and 
also of many good times. 

Fraternally, 

Carolyn Matejeck, Secretary 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 538 

• 

McALESTER AUXILIARY SPONSORS WINNING QUEEN 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies' Auxiliary No. 423 of McAlester, Oklahoma. 

We were reorganized March 12, 1947. Our membership is small but we are very 
active. 

Each year since our reorganization, we have sent delegates to the Oklahoma State 
Council of Auxiliaries Convention. The President of our Auxiliary, Mrs. Virginia Self, who 
was our delegate this year, was elected Recording Secretary at the State Convention which 
convened at Tulsa, Oklahoma, September 12, 1949. 

We meet every first and third Monday nights of the month at the Labor Temple. 

We have had Christmas parties and several covered dish suppers for our members and 
their families. 

Our Sunshine Fund is used for cards and flowers for our members. We have contributed 
to the Red Cross, March of Dimes and we plan to contribute to the Iron Lung Fund which 
is sponsored by the local P. T. A. Council. 

Our Auxiliary and Carpenters' Local No. 986 sponsored a "Queen" in the Golden 
Anniversary celebration of McAlester. Our Queen won the title of "Miss McAlester" along 
with a trip to Hollywood, Calif., and many wonderful gifts. 

To increase our treasury, we have held rummage sales and we are now selling chances 
on a chenille bedspread. 

We read and enjoy "The Carpenter" and find many helpful ideas from other AuxiUary 
letters. 

Best wishes to our Sister Auxiliaries. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Lorene Morrow, Recording Secretary 



NAPA AUXILIARY OFF TO A FINE START 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 544, of Napa, Calif. 

We are a newly organized Auxiliary. Installation of oflBcers for 1949-50 was held in 
July in the Labor Temple at Napa, Calif. 

With the addition of four new members at the meeting, the membership roll hit the 
56 mark. Officers installed were: Francis Luntey, President; Edna Hatmaker, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Rose Hulce, Secretary; Rena Hansen, Financial Secretary and Treasurer; Pearl Dim- 
mick. Conductor; Mabel Breshears, Warden; Melba Krenke, Opal Lake and Mary Schoon- 
maker. Trustees. 

Mrs. Dan Wickman of the Sonoma Auxiliary was the installing officer for the ceremonies, 
which were held in a hall decorated with varied colored gladioli and other garden flowers. 

All of us read and enjoy "The Carpenter" very much. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Bemice Hiserman, Pubhcity Chairman 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

By H. H. Siegele 

LESSON 256 

Other Irregular Plan Roofs.— It should be 
stated that the irregular plans that are used 
in this lesson were chosen, not because 
they are much in use, but because they 
make possible different applications of the 
principles involved. The truth is that the 
principles of irregular plan roof framing 
must be adapted to whatever design the 
roof framer finds himself confronted with, 
just as he must do in regular roof framing. 
The method used here for obtaining the 
points with which the edge bevels for hips, 
valleys, and jacks are made, will apply on 
any kind of hip or valley roof. The only 




Fig. 1 



reason that the different designs are given 
is to show the different results that the 
different applications bring out. The roof 
framer should make diagrams, such as are 
shown here, letting inches on the square 
equal feet in the plan, or he might use 
some other convenient scale. This is the 
most practical way to obtain the points to 
be used on the square. 

Right Angle to Plate.— A thing that often 
puzzles the beginner, and sometimes the 
journeyman, in irregular plan roof framing, 
is the position the common and jack rafters 
are placed in, with regard to the plates. 
Fig. 1 shows an irregular roof plan. Here 
the hips are pointed out, and three one- 
line common rafters, presumed to be in 



place, are indicated with the letters, C.R., 
standing for common rafter. The three 
squares are in position showing that the 
common and jack rafters, in plan, are 

c 




set at a right angle to the plates, as the 
tongues show. 

Edge Bevel for Hips.— Fig. 2 shows the 
left end of the diagram shown in Fig. 1, 
with the square applied to the run of the 




Fig. 3 

upper left hip. (The scale, in these dia- 
grams, as mentioned before, is one inch 
on the square equals one foot on the plan.) 
Now extend the edge line of the tongue to 
point B, or a little beyond, and the edge 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



line of the blade to the rafter length, as 
shown by dotted line. The rise is 9 inches 
to the foot, as shown. The diagonal dotted 
line from 9 on the tongue to the corner of 
the deck, is the length of the hip rafter. 
With a compass, transfer this rafter length 
to the extended line of the blade, as shown. 
Draw the dotted line between A and B in 
line with the small end of the deck. Where 




this line intersects with the extended line 
of the tongue, is tlie point giving the length 
of the tangent. Draw the dotted line from 
B to C— also the dotted line representing 
the tangent, parallel with tlie tongue of the 
square and in line with the point giving 
the rafter length. Complete the triangle by 
drawing the line from C to the corner of 




the deck. To obtain the edge bevel for 
the hip where it fits the deck, take the 
rafter length on tlie blade, and the tan- 
gent on the tongue— the rafter length will 
give the bevel. It is apparent that the 
tongue is not long enough to hold the tan- 
gent, so by dividing both the rafter length 
and the tangent by 2, the figures will be 
reduced so that the square will hold them. 



Another Way.-Fig. 3 shows the same 
end of the diagram, but the application 
of the square is different. Here the side 
line of the deck is extended, as shown by 
dotted line, until it contacts the extended 
tongue hne. The rafter length is trans- 
ferred with the compass, as in the other 
case. The other lines are then drawn in 
as explained in Fig. 2, since the principle 
is the same. While the rafter length and 
the tangent will give the edge bevel for 
the hip, in this case the run is taken on 
the blade of the square, and point A on 
the tongue— the blade will give the bevel. 
The bevel in both of these illustrations is 
exactly the same. The difference is all in 
the place where tlie square has been ap- 
plied—everything else is the same. Study 
Figs. 2 and 3. 

Still Another Way.-Fig. 4 shows the 
wide end of the roof diagram, with the 




square applied to the hip run. Here again, 
the side line of the deck is extended until 
it contacts die extended tongue line. The 
rafter length is transferred to the extended 
blade line, as in the other two cases. The 
rafter length and the tangent will give the 
bevel. The edge bevel can also be obtained 
by taking the run on the blade, and the 



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42 



THE CARPENTER 



distance between the heel and point C, on 
the tongue. In both cases the blade will 
give the edge bevel. The figures can be 
made still more convenient, by pulling the 
square back until tlie figure 12 comes to 
point B, then 12 on the blade and point 
A on the tongue, shown by dotted lines, 
will give the bevel— mark along the blade. 
Edge Bevel for Jacks.— Fig. 5 shows the 
wide end of the roof plan, with the square 
applied for obtaining the points witli which 



CARPENTERS 
HANDBOOK 

consists of short bui practical 
rules for laying out roofs, ceil- 
ings, hoppers, stairs and arches 
nith tables of board measure, 
length of common, hip, valley 
and lack rafters, square meas- 
ure, etc. — also, rules for kerf- 
ing, laying off gambrel roof and 
explaining the steel square. 
Money back if not satisfied 

SI. 00 postpaid 

D. A. ROGERS 

5344 Clinton Ave. 
Minneapolis 9, Minn. 



the edge bevel for the jacks is made. The 
diagonal distance between 9 and 12 is the 
rafter length. This length is transferred 
with the compass to the extended blade 
line, as shown by the dotted part-circle. 





Fig. 7 
The tongue is long enough in this case to 
take the tangent. The other lines are drawn 
as in the otlier cases. Now tlie rafter length 
on the blade, and the tangent on the ton- 
gue will give the edge bevel for the jacks. 




Fig. 8 
The same bevel can be obtained by taking 
the run on the blade and the point where 
the diagonal line crosses the edge of the 
tongue. The blade will give the bevel. 
The principle here again is the same as 
in the other cases. 

Edge Bevel for Valleys.— Fig. 6 shows 
a roof plan with a dull angle, where a 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



valley rafter is to be placed. The side of 
the roof is extended, as shown by dotted 
line, until it contacts the extended tongue 
line, which is also shown by dotted line. 
In this case the rise shown is 12 inches. 
The lencfth of the rafter is transferred from 




Fig. 9 



this point to the extended blade line, as 
shown by the dotted part-circle. Now the 
rafter length and the tangent will give the 
edge bevel— the rafter length giving the 
bevel. The principle here is the same as 
in all the other cases previously explained. 
Study the diagram until you understand 
it. 




fter Length --7^2_-- '*■ 

Fig. 10 

Edge Bevel for Valley Jacks.— Fig. 7 
shows how to obtain the edge bevel for 
valley jacks joining the valley rafter dealt 
with in Fig. 6. The rise is 12 inches, mak- 
ing it a half pitch roof. The process is 
the same as in the Other cases. The rafter 



length and the tangent give the edge bevel 
—the former giving the bevel. Study the 
drawing. 

Edge Bevel for Sharp Angle Valleys.— 

Fig. 8 shows how to obtain the points for 
marking the edge bevel of valley rafters 
for a sharp angle, such as shown. The 
principle is the same as in the other cases. 
The rafter length and the tangent will give 
the edge bevel— the former giving the bev- 
el. 




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BUILDERS' TOPICS 

1512 Market St. Seattle 7, Wash. 



44 



THE CARPENTER 



Edge Bevel for Valley Jacks.— Fig. 9 
shows how to obtain the points for mark- 
ing the edge bevel for the valley jacks 
joining a sharp angle valley rafter. The 
principle again is exactly the same as in 
all the otlier cases shown. The student is 
asked to work it out. The run of this roof 
diagram is 12 feet, which is true of all 
the other roof diagrams shown in this les- 
son. 

A Detail.— Fig. 10 shows the principle of 
obtaining the points for marking the edge 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EX- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
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bevels in this lesson, applied to a regular 
hip roof with a 12-foot run and a 12-foot 
rise. With the square in position A, the 
drawing is completed as in the other cases. 
Then if the square were pushed forward 
to position B, the rafter length and the 
tangent (the distance between point 1 and 
the heel of the square) will give the edge 
be^'el. In position A, 17 and point 2, will 
give the bevel, while in position C, 12 and 
point 3 wnll give the edge bevel. The blade 
in each of these cases will give the bevel. 



WANTS TO KNOW 

By H. H. Siegele 

A reader wants to know how to lay out 
stringers for \^'inding stairs. Since both stair 
horses and skirt boards are often called string- 
ers, I will illustrate both. The caution given 
in a previous article about winders, should 




Fig. 1 

be kept in mind here. Fig. 1 shows at the 
bottom right a plan of a three-step flight 
of winders. To the left are shown foiu: 
straight steps. The winders are numbered 
1, 2, 3, and the straight steps are numbered 
4, 5, 6 and 7. These nimibers are the same 



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TOU DO TNIS 



THE CARPENTER 



45 



on both the plan and the stretch-out of 
the rough stringers, or horses. First lay out 
the winders on the plan and then the 
straight steps. This done, set the compass 
at point c and carry point a to d, as shown 
by the dotted quarter circle. In tlie same 
way transfer point b to e. Now lay off 
the stringers. The first one supports the 
wide end of the first winder and half of the 
second winder. The second stringer sup- 
ports one-half of the second winder, and 
the third winder. The stringer, shown in 
part, supports the four straight steps. The 
perpendicular dotted lines locate the risers, 
while the height of the steps is governed by 
tlie rise per step. 

Quite frequently the skirt board, or fin- 
ished stringer, for winders is not housed, 
but in the better stairs they usually are. 
Fig. 2 shows the same plan of the flight of 
three winders and the four straight steps at 




• Fig. 2 

i the bottom. A stretch-out of the skirt boards 
is shown at the top. The board marked A 
on the stretch-out is for the side marked A 
on the plan. In relatively the same way, 



the board marked B goes on the side marked 
B, and C is for the side C. The perpendic- 
ular dotted lines again locate the rough 
risers, as a little study will show. Both 
the winders and the steps are shown wedged 
into the housing, which is as practical with 
winders as with straight steps, but when this 
is done the rough stringers must be held 
away from the wall, to let the bottom edge 
of the skirt board in. 



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NOTICE 

The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be. In their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellahle. are only accepted srbject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

The American Floor Surfacing 

Machine Co., Toledo, Ohio, — 5 

Ardee Tool Co., Rocky River 

Sta., Ohio 47 

E. C. Atkins and Co., Indianapolis. 

Ind. 4th Cover 

Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 43 

Cummins Portable Tools, Chicago, 

111. 1 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 45 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 44 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 6 

Greenlee Tool Co., Rockford, Ill._3rd Cover 
Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 6 

Heston and Anderson, Fairfield, 

Iowa 46 

The Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 6 

The Paine Co., Chicago, 111 48 

Singer Kennedy Corp., Chicago, 

III. 47 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 

Carpentry Materials 

E. L. Bruce Co., Memphis, Tenn_ 42 

H. Riechers, Palo Alto. Calif 44 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 42 

The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._2nd Cover 
Western Metalcraft, Inc., Olympia, 

Wash. 4 

Technical Coiu'ses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 47 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Builders Topics, Seattle, Wash._ 43 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 41 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y. 48 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo— 45 



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Name 

Address 

City State 







STANLEY NO. 700 
WOODWORKER'S VISE 

Completely New — Stanley No. 700. Grips work 
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AUDELS Carpenters 
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[4vois.^6 

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Inside Trade Information On: S5F fEEE° coupon beiow 

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How to set girders and sills — How to frame 

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— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

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Name- 



CAR 



"I'LL TAKE 




ANYTIME 

— ff sure makes saving easier!*^ 

He's right — you just can't beat "Silver Steel" 
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E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY 

Nome Office and Factory: 402 South Illinois Street, Indianapolis 9, Indiana 

Branch Factory: Portland, Oregon 

Branch Offices: ATLANTA • CHICAGO • NEW ORLEANS • NEW YORK 



EfnKB 



jCMPENTER 




FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of tfte 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 




FEBRUARY, 1950 




let FRED LUDWIG fen 



you 



how UPSON 
KUVER'KRAK PANELS 
solved the cratked 
telling problem in 
his own home 

FRED H. LUDWiG, President Merritt 
Lumber Yards, Inc., Reading, Pa., former 
president National Retail Lumber Dealers 
Association, nationally known Merchan- 
diser of quality building materials, writes: 
"The reason that I used Upson Kuver- 
Krak Panels in the living room and library 
of my own residence was brought about 
by the great difficulty I had with the 
plaster cracking. 

"Having the faith in Upson Panels, 
developed through the many years that 
we've handled your products, prompted 
me to use it and once and for ml, get rid 
of further failures. 

"I am glad to report to you that these 
panels have been very satisfactory and 
have done everything that we expected 
them to do." 



•^ i* 



\'S^ 




Above: Mr. Ludwig's living room with an Upson-panelled 
ceiling. Right: One of the showplaces of eastern Pennsyl- 
vania, the residence of Mr. Ludwig at Wyomiasing. 



Like Fred Ludwig, thou- 
sands of lumber dealers 
and thousands of carpen- 
ters will tell you there's 
nothing like Upson Panels 
for _ re-covering cracked 
ceilings. 

mail this 



covpon today! 



> 



THE UPSON COMPANY 

5312 Upson Point, Lockporl, N.Y. 

I am interested in knowing more about Upson Strong-Bilt 
Panels Q Kuver-Krak Panels D- Send me a free copy of your 
booklet — "New Interiors For Old." 

NAME 

TYPE OF BUSINESS 

STREET . 

CITY STATE 




STEAPyyBAR 'ROUHP WORK- 
SANP NSW AttP OLP FLOORS 

Look into the money-making possibilities of start- 
ing a floor sanding business — if you want steady 
and pleasant indoor work — a good substantial in- 
come with earnings of $2 5 and more a day — ^an 
opportunity to operate as a sub-contractor in new 
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No experience or special schooling needed— 
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'No large investment — the overhead is low and you 
need no elaborate oflices, workshop, storeroom or 
trucking equipment. Many men operate from their 
own home and use a regular passenger car to 
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Thousands of men have been successful in the 
floor surfacing business. You let the machine do 
the work. It's pleasant inside work and usually the 
buildings have some heat. No ladders or scaffolding 
to climb. A business that can bring you a lot of 
satisfaction and steady money! Send today for 
"money-making" booklet entitled "Opportunities 
in Floor Surfacing" — use coupon and enclose 25c 
in coin or stamps to cover handling. The American 
Floor Surfacing Machine Co., Toledo, Ohio. 




Ben W. Kenney, 
veteran floorman 
of Kansas City, 
Mo., started years 
ago in floor sand- 
ing and has stead- 
/ ily expanded this 
business. Today, 
Ben and Forest C. Kenney op- 
erate the Acme Floor Co. with 
a total of 19 American Floor 
Sanders, Spinner Edgers, and 
Polishers. 

A On«-Man Business 

Ed Clanin lives in a 
Michigan city of 
20,000. He has an 
American Floor 
Sander and an 
American Spinner 
for the edges, clos- 
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also an American Maintenance 
Machine for disc sanding, steel 
wooling and polishing. He av- 
erages 75 to 100 floor jobs per 
year. 




MERICAN 

\ FLOOR MACHINES 

i^nA Coupon Today! 



The American Floor Surfacing 

Machine Co., 
520 So. St. Clair St., Toledo, Ohio 

• Enclosed find 25c in stamps Of 
coin for booklet "Opportunities in 
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can start my own floor sanding bus- 
iness. 



Name. 
• Street- 



City. 



. State. 



Trade Mark Re?. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXX — No. 2 



INDIANAPOLIS, FEBRUARY, 1950 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



Con tents — 



1950 Is a Crucial Election Year 



It is no exaggeration to say that this year's elections will afFect the welfare of work- 
ing people for years to come, since the current Congress Is still dominated by reaction- 
aries. If the people are to obtain decent Social Security, middle income housing, aid to 
education, etc., they will have to vote it into effect next November by electing men 
who believe in such progress. 



Watch Your Pinky, Pal 



An article In the "flarvard Business Review," highbrow publication of the broad "A" 
boys, suggests that the way to better industrial relations lies in inviting more business 
agents and union officials to pink teas and tea dansantes. It seems all us labor skates 
are just dying to bust into high society and >when we don't make it we get all sorts of 
frustrations and inhibitions. 



The Nation Honors Gompers 



The Role of Workers Education 



13 

A thousand union members, friends and special guests taxed the banquet facilities of 
Washington's biggest hotel on January 5th to inaugurate the Samuel Gompers Centen- 
nial Year v/hose object it is to add a million new members to the Federation as a 
memorial to the peerless leader. 

18 



The difference between ordinary education and workers education can be explained 
by the story of the home economics teacher who was giving a lecture on the best way 
of making nutritious soup out of cheap bones. When she asked if there were any ques- 
tions, an old Scotch lady in the back of the room asked: "Yes, who got the meat from 
the bones in the first place? 

31 

With a mid-summer slump seeming to be inevitable unless purchasing power can be 
increased, the AFL offers a hard-hitting program for staving off additional unemploy- 
ment. It is as simple as it is feasible— more pay for more production and no price in- 
creases. 



More Wages Mean More Jobs 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
Editorials 
The Locker 
Official 

In Memoriam 
Correspondence 
To the Ladies 
Craft Problems 



16 
23 
29 
33 
34 
35 
39 
41 



Index to Advertisers 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



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Name : Age 

Address Occupation 

City Zone - State 



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CUMMINS MODEL 600 SAW 
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sow blade. 

Name , 



Model 

630 

Sander 

$4950 



CUMMINS MODEL 630 
SANDING UNIT 

Mounts to Cummins Model 600 Sow as 
shown. Standard 4' x 27' belts "msure 
fast, efficient sanding. Quick, easy od- 
justment for removing and replacing 
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With saw mounted, unit weigKs 1 8 lbs. 




Model 

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Planer 

$6400 



CUMMINS MODEL 640 
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.Address 



Occupation City. 



.Zone State | 



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1950 IS A CRUCIAL ELECTION YEAR 



IN NOVEMBER of this year, the working people of the nation will have 
an opportunity to complete the task which they undertook in 1948. At 
the beginning of the 1948 political campaign, organized labor set as its 
goal the election of a liberal Congress to replace the 80th Congress which not 
only passed the Taft-Hartley Act but also turned thumbs down on a great 
deal of badly needed social legislation. In the 1948 elections, organized labor 
did a tremendous job. Many Taft-Hartley Senators and Representatives were 
sent to the political scrap heap while men cognizant of and sympathetic with 
the views of the working man were sent to Washington to fill their seats. How- 
ever, the 1948 labor victory was not quite enough. The election of only 14 
more liberal Representatives and 5 more liberal Senators would have com- 
pleted the task. By that small margin, organized labor fell short of its goal of 
electing a progressive Congress. So the Taft-Hartley Law is still on the books 
and a great deal of sorely needed social legislation is still unpassed. 

This year the task must be completed. In November we will have a 
golden opportunity to send to Washington the kind of a Congress the work- 
ing people of the nation need— a Congress that sees nothing socialistic in 
Social Security or nothing monopolistic in collective bargaining. It will not 
be an easy job, but it is a job that can be done if working people will register 
and vote. This time the element of surprise will not be working to the advan- 
tage of the liberal forces. In 1948 the reactionaries thought that the labor 
vote was a myth. They scoffed at the idea that organized labor could rally 
its strength effectively. But when the ballots were counted they got a rude 
awakening. They realized that labor can carry elections when it is really 
organized. 

Now that they are aware of the fact, they are altering their strategy for 
the coming election. "Welfare state" and "English socialism" are scare words 
they have invented to throw at the people in an effort to halt the march of 
progressivism. The reactionary elements are already busy raising millions of 
dollars in campaign funds for an all-out attack against liberal candidates and 
liberal ideas. To hold the political gains it made in the 1948 elections and to 
pick up the necessary 14 liberal votes in the House and 5 liberal votes in the 
Senate, organized labor will have to rise to new heights in the coming election. 
It will have to raise larger political funds and step up the tempo of its drives 
to get members registered and ready to vote on election day. It will have to 
drive home to every working man the importance of voting for liberal candi- 
dates. It will have to carry the fight right to the precinct level. The job wili 
not be an easy one, but it is a job that can and must be done. 

In 1948, labor gained its first experience in attempting to raise money for 
political purposes. A sort of trial and error method was followed. The results 
were spotty, and experience has shown that some changes are necessary. This 
year a new procedure is to be followed. At a national political rally in Wash- 
ington, D. C. last July, the following program was adopted: 



8 THE CARPENTER 

1. It was decided that the task of raising funds through voluntary dona- 
tions should be centralized in Labor's League for Political Education, 
the political arm of the American Federation of Labor. This year 
Labor's League for Political Education will make the one big appeal 
for voluntary contributions. 

2. It was decided to seek voluntary individual contributions of $2.00 or 
more from every member of a union affiliated with the AFL. 

Within the next week or ten days, every Local Union in the United Broth- 
erhood will receive a communication from Labor's League for Political Edu- 
cation asking that a solicitation be made of members for voluntary individual 
contributions of $2.00 or more. LLPE will supply receipt books and buttons 
directly. All monies collected by Local Unions are to be sent directly to the 
League. Half of such monies will be retained by the League for political 
activities on a national basis and the other half will be credited to state organ- 
izations for use in their own areas. An accounting of all monies donated by 
Brotherhood Locals will be made to the General Office monthly by the League. 
Last time International Unions, Central Bodies, State Federations and many 
other labor groups held conflicting solicitations. The result was confusion and 
misunderstanding. Union members did not know to whom they should con- 
tribute. By centralizing all solicitations in the hands of LLPE this year, the 
problem has been simplified. The big solicitation will be the LLPE solicitation. 
One $2.00 contribution will help support, local and state political activities as 
well as national activities. 

It is no exaggeration to say that the welfare of working people for many 
years to come will be at stake in this year's election. The following is only a 
partial list of vital matters that will be decided by the election, since liberal 
Congressmen are outnumbered in the present session: 

SOCIAL SECURITY. Whetlier or not Social Security will be liberalized 

»■ enough so that retired workers can live decently will de- 

pend on whether or not we have a liberal Congress. 

TAXES. With the budget running in the red, new tax programs 

will have to be devised. If we have a reactionary Congress 
the tax load will be lifted from the shoulders of the rich 
and added to the shoulders of the poor. On the other hand, 
a liberal Congress will spread the tax load according to 
ability to pay. 

LABOR LEGISLATION. A reactionary Congress means a continuation of the 

Taft-Hartley Law and even more vicious anti-labor leg- 
islation in the future. A liberal Congress means repeal 
of the Taft-Hartley Law and the encouragement of free, 
independent unions and genuine collective bargaining. 

AID TO EDUCATION, 
MIDDLE INCOME HOUSING, 
NATIONAL HEALTH AND A HOST 
OF OTHER IMPORTANT MATTERS 

To achieve victory in 1950, every working man will have to do his duty 
by donating, registering and voting. These are all things each union member 
must do for himself. No organization can do the job for him. 

If each of us does his duty, victory will be a cinch. 



Watch Your Pinky, Pal 

• • • 

SOME 200 YEARS ago a keen minded and observant English churchman 
named Jonathan Swift pubhshed a number of books deahng with the 
foibles and fetishes of the day in a humorous and satirical manner. Noth- 
ing was too sacred for Swift to poke a little fun at. Disgusted with the extreme 
poverty of the times, in one book he propounded at length on a way in which 
children could be kept from becoming a burden to the poor. His suggestion 
was that they could be fattened and eaten. 

However, his best known work is Gulliver's Travels, a sort of saga of a 
seaman's travels to far off mythical lands. In the various places where Gulliver 
visited, the people were invariably carrying to the logical conclusion the silly 
practices which Englishmen of the time were following at home in lesser de- 
gree. One of the places Gulliver vis- 



ited was a land where science was 
everything. All the citizens were 
busily engaged in delving into scien- 
tific research. They had no time to 
do things the way their fathers did 
them. They were too busy searching 
for more scientific ways, with the 
result that incredible poverty existed. 
The one farmer who cultivated and 
fertilized his lands in the time hon- 
ored way produced tremendous crops, 
but he was an outcast in the land of 
science. His methods were called un- 
scientific and old fashioned. In the 
end, the pressure to which he was 
subjected became so great, that, he 
too, abandoned the traditional way of 
farming and devoted himself to scien- 
tific research. His fields stopped pro- 
ducing anything, but at least he 
placed himself in tune with the times. 

During the last two centuries, mil- 
lions of people probably have derived 
good hearty laughs out of this por- 
tion of Swift's satire. Yet even today 
there is enough basis of truth in 
Swift's exaggerated picture of hold- 
ing in awe anything that smacks of 
the scientific to cause one to wonder. 



One has to look no farther than the 
bread situation which exists at the 
present time. For months Congress 
has been holding hearings to deter- 
mine whether or not bakers should 
be compelled by law to indicate on 
the wrappers of the loaves of bread 
they turn out a list of the ingredients 
used in making the bread. The hear- 
ings have uncovered the fact that 
some dozen various chemicals are 
used in turning out today's bread. 
Some of these chemicals are derived 
from crude oil, some are derived from 
coal, and some are derived from even 
less appetizing sources. 

Now the funny part of the whole 
thing is that wheat is the most nearly 
perfect food there is. In its natural 
state it contains all the vitamins and 
minerals that the human body needs. 
However, through scientific "im- 
provement," whole wheat no longer 
goes into the manufacture of ordin- 
ary bread. The wheat germ and the 
husk are removed at the flour mill. 
With these two components of the 
wheat grain go most of the nutritious 
elements in wheat. So the baker takes 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



the white residue we call toda}-'s flour 
and adds to it a host of chemicals de- 
ri\'ed from all sorts of inert raw ma- 
terials and then proceeds to crow 
about his "enriched" bread. Some- 
how or other it brings to mind GuUi- 
\"er's Travels whenever the papers 
earn," news stories about what is go- 
ing on in the Washington hearings. 

However, it was not bread that 
brought on this philosophizing; rather 
it was an article in the current issue 
of Har\"ard Business Review. This 
article deals at some length with 
the social status of labor leaders. 
Over the years our great universi- 
ties have turned out learned and eru- 
dite pieces on "The Love Life of the 
Frog" and "The Effects of Cucumber 
Blight in Man-dand on Soil Erosion," 
but this is the first time that the social 
habits of labor leaders have come 
under the microscopes of the Broad 
"A" boys. The conclusions will startle 
many business agents and financial 
secretaries. 

It seems that we who labor in the 
union \'ineyards for our daily bread 
(vitamin enriched with pure putt}' 
factory by-products) are considered 
an uncultured and uncouth class of 
louts. We do not know which fork 
to use in eating Crepe Suzettes (if it's 
a fork you use in eating them), or 
whether the little finger ought to be 
extended at a se\'ent}'-five or ninet>' 
degree angle in swigging tea. The 
result is we do not get asked to join 
the Counfay Club or the Philharmonic 
Societ}'. This in turn gives us all 
sorts of inhibitions and frustrations 
which make us bitter at our employ- 
ers who keep the leather chairs at 
the Union League Club well-shined 
with the seats of their britches. The 
end result is that we take out our 
spite on the employers b}- making 
all sorts of unreasonable demands 
just because we did not get an invite 



to the Grand Cotillion Ball at the 
El Swanko. As the writer \'iews the 
situation, labor-management relations 
could be greatly improved if more 
business agents were in\dted to tea 
dans antes and buffet luncheons at 
the Gotrocks and Astorbilts. 

Far be it from us to contradict so 
great on authority as the writer. After 
all he worked for a public relations 
firm that once did some work for a 
couple of unions. Off and on for a 
couple of years he came in contact 
with labor leaders every once in 
awhile. That made him an expert 
not only on unions but also on the 
habits, thinking and mores of union 
officials. When he states that a bitter 
strike in Detroit resulted more from 
the fact that the daughter of a certain 
international union representative got 
turned down by an exclusive girl's 
school and less from the fact the im- 
ion members felt entitled to better 
wages and working conditions, his 
\iews must be respected. 

We have no idea how many union 
people are interested in private 
schools for their offspring. But one 
thing we do know. The public schools 
have no greater champion than the 
union people of the nation. After 
all it was the unions that inaugurated 
the fight for free public schools. It 
was the union people who agitated 
for them dowm the years and kept 
up a constant pressure on the Fed- 
eral government and state legisla- 
tures until such schools were estab- 
lished. If anyone wants to really 
make a lot of union people mad, 
let him tamper with the free public 
school system. 

Maybe more lady-finger parties are 
the clue to better labor relations. On 
the other hand, maybe fewer labor 
"experts" from government, universi- 
ties, public relations firms and what 
have you, injecting themselves into 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



the picture might make a real con- 
tribution to more harmonious labor- 
management relations, too. The day 
when representatives from labor and 
management could sit down around 
the table and thrash out an agree- 
ment that both sides understood and 
respected seems long since to have 
passed out of the picture. Today 
there are federal "experts" and state 
"experts" from this Board and that 
Bureau kibitzing on nearly every 
meeting where labor and manage- 
ment get together. Often gobbledy- 
gook which no one understands is 
the result. 

Unlike the author of the Harvard 
Business Review article, we are not 
going to indulge in generalizations. 
There are good labor leaders and bad, 
just as there are good employers and 
bad. There may even be labor lead- 
ers who want to break into high so- 
ciety. If there are, more power to 
them. However, to imply that labor 
leaders as a class suffer from frustra- 
tions and inhibitions because their 
wives do not belong to the Junior 
League is stretching the facts too 
far. In the first place, with people 
who really count, there is no looking 
down the nose at labor officials. After 
all the President of the United States 
tore himself away from the press of 
ofiicial business to pay a short visit to 
a thousand labor officials assembled 
at the Statler Hotel in Washington 
last month to pay tribute to the mem- 
ary of Samuel Gompers. That is more 
than he did when the National Asso- 
ciation of Manufacturers met— and 
this is not discounting the fact that 
the President is a politician and labor 
represents votes. 

With the captains of industry and 
the men who have done things and 
gotten somewhere, there is no pat- 
ronizing of labor officials. They frank- 
ly meet as equals. With the ribbon 



clerks, however, the story is some- 
what different. The petty officials and 
hangers-on who bask in the reflected 
glory of their superiors sometimes 
build up their own importance by 
knocking unions and snubbing labor 
officials. We recall that a famous 
newspaperman who interviewed 
kings and presidents and ambassa- 
dors in his time found an interview 
with a man who had just been made 
manager of a pants factory the most 
difficult in his career, according to his 
memoirs. 

The writer of this article had the 
fortune or misfortune to spend sev- 
eral years working nights in one of 
the swankiest country clubs on the 
Pacific Coast during the time when 
he was trying to acquire a little "book 
learnin." That was many years ago, 
but the memory of the four-flushing 
and apple polishing and boot-licking 
that went on among the membership 
of that club is still fresh in our mind. 
Come to think of it, all the special 
privilege and favoritism and bowing 
and scraping that nine men out of 
ten join a union to avoid was the ac- 
cepted thing in that club. Half the 
people that belonged had no business 
there. They could not pay their bills, 
let alone meet the high club dues. 
But they belonged anyhow and hard- 
ly a day went past but what some 
beaten down grocer or butcher was 
trying to contact them to collect a 
long past due bill. They had nothing 
in their pockets but they did not 
seem to care so long as they could 
address old man Gotrocks as "J. P." 
or rub shoulders with old Astorbilt— 
and probably damn the unions. 

Maybe there are union officials who 
want to break into that kind of a set- 
up, but we doubt if there are very 
many. The union school is a hard 
school. Occasionally a phony swims 
to the top. But nine times out of 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



ten a union official gets to the top 
because he is capable and sincere. A 
director of a corporation who is a 
phori}" rna\" hang on to his job for 
his lifetime because he ne\'er meets 
the stockholders face to face. But 
\\"ith a business agent or financial 
secretary it is different. E^'erA" day 
he cames into contact with the peo- 
ple who hire him, and once or t^.^ice 
a month he has to meet them face to 
face in a meeting to account for his 
stewardship. Tlie union official who 
is not sincere does not usualh" last 
very long. Of course there are ex- 
ceptions here and there and that is 
exacth" what they are— exceptions. 

It has been the experience of this 
v.-riter that labor officials are not al- 
wa}"S accorded the front pews when 
a visiting celebrit}' is coming to to\\"n 
or when a fine civic project is to be 
dedicated or when an unusual cele- 
bration to take place, but there is 
one time when labor gets the lime- 
light. That is when there is blood 
to raise for the blood bank, or funds 
to collect for the Communit}' Fund or 
Red Cross. Then labor is gi\'en all 
the pats on the back it can take. 
"\A"hether it is blood or dollars, the 



workers are urged to give amid great 

whoopla and fanfare. And in^'ariably 
they do gi\'e; which is as it should be 
since they are all good causes. But 
we ha\"e }"et to see any such organ- 
ized whoopla inaugurated to get 
members of the Chamber of Com- 
merce to give blood. 

In the final anah'sis. an\' labor 
leader who feels frustrated because 
of his position is either ignorant or 
gullible. Hardly an issue of this jour- 
nal published durmg the past year 
failed to carr}- a stor}- of some Local 
L nion in Texas or Kansas or Illinois 
\'oluntarih- rebuilding a burned out 
house for some unfortunate feUow 
citizen or donating the labor on the 
construction of a Boy Scout camp or 
mammoth stage for a community 
celebration. These are the things 
that realh" count in any societ}'. For 
those who like them, tea dansantes 
and cotillions are okay. But in the 
sohd things of this life, the things 
that make hfe better for a lot of 
people, the union men and women 
are in the vei}- front ranks. -\nd the 
back of our hand to an}' and all dil- 
letantes who say otherwise.— Peter E. 
Terzick, 



League to Distribute Funds About March 1st 

About March 1. Labor's League for Political Education will begin sending to state LLPE 
units their shares of campaign funds it is collecting. 

Workers are making S2 voluntary- contributions to Labor's League for the 1950 Con- 
gressional campaign. All money to be used by Labor's League in the campaign is con- 
tributed voluntarily. 

The contributions are sent to the national LLPE orBce in Washington v%"here the>' are 
processed according to the pro\-i5ions of the Taft-Hartley Act. 

T-H provides that workers' organizations must raise money voluntarily for Congres- 
sional pohtical campaigns. Xo union funds may be used for that purpose. And there are 
strict regulations concerning records of the volvmtarj' contributions. 

Half of the money voluntarily contributed in each state wiU be sent back to that state. 
The other half goes into a national fund to be used wherever it vriB. do the most good. 

About March 1 the states' half of contributions made up to that time will be sent to 
tlie states. The fund campaign got under way about two months ago. 

After the initial distribution of money, states will receive their half of additional funds 
collected the first of each month, - - '" ' 



13 



THE NATION HONORS GOMPERS 



A HUNDRED YEARS ago a Jewish boy was born in a little one-room 
flat of an East Side London slum. His parents, desperately poor, named 
him after an ancient Hebrew prophet. To the world, he became famous 
as Samuel Gompers. 

On the 5th of last month one of the largest crowds ever to attend a ban- 
quet in the nation's capital thronged into Washington's biggest hotel to pay 
tribute to that boy. 



President Truman left a heavy load 
of work at the White House to join 
in the tribute. Vice-President Alben 
W. Barkley was the ace orator of the 
evening. Five members of the Presi- 
dent's Cabinet, as well as many mem- 
bers of Congress and other notables, 
also came to honor the memory of 
the man who has gone down in his- 
tory as American labor's greatest 
leader and statesman. 

Over 1,000 guests occupied ta- 
bles in two big halls of the hotel. 
Every affiliate of the American 
Federation of Labor, which Gom- 
pers founded in 1881 and headed— 
with the exception of one year— un- 
til his death in 1924, was repre- 
sented, along with officials of many 
independent imions. Nearly all 
Standard Railroad Labor Organi- 
zations had delegates present. 

The banquet was the "sendoff" 
for the Samuel Gompers' Centen- 
nial year. Local and state celebra- 
tions are to follow all over the 
country, and coupled with these, 
the Federation has established an 
organizing goal of a million new 
members in 1950 as a monument 
to Gompers. 

Secretary-Treasurer George 
Meany of the A. F. of L., banquet 
toastmaster, set the keynote when he 
declared that the immigrant boy, who 



came to these shores at the age of 13, 
was a great American "who believed 
in freedom for all." 

"To Gompers, the United States 
came first," Meany said. "Running 
like a thread through his life was his 
love of country. He left a great heri- 
tage and a great responsibility, which 
we shall fulfill." 

Barkley made a tremendous hit. 




SAMUEL GOMPERS 

One of his most attentive listeners 
was the lovely lady who became Mrs. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



Barkley only a few weeks ago. She 
sat beside him at the speakers' table. 

The "Veep" started off in a light 
vein wdth a t\^pical Barkleyism that 
drew roars of laughter. Referring to 
the hundreds of vice-presidents of 
various unions present, he declared: 
"I didn't realize I'd have so much 
competition tonight. I haven't seen 
so many vice-presidents since I was 
inaugurated." 

Then, in a serious note, he told of 
his acquaintance with Gompers in the 
days when he was a member of the 
House "I doubt there has e\'er been 
or ever can be a labor leader who can 
so indelibly impress his personality on 
the countr}'." Barkley declared. 

"Samuel Gompers found America 
the land of promise," the Vice Presi- 
dent continued. "He helped to make 
it a land of fulfillment. The American 
way of life was humanized and en- 
riched by his life and his labors. 

"He fought and won the battles 
against sweatshops and star\'ation 
wages, against industrial serfdom and 
oppression. He met and defeated the 
challenge of Communist attempts to 
control the labor movement. He be- 
lieved that in a free country free 
working men and women, acting to- 
gether of their own free will, could 
impro\-e their standard of living 
through democratic processes— history 
now records how right he was." 

Barkley wound up by declaring, 
amid cheers, that the labor movement 
is "our greatest bulwark against un- 
democratic influences" and that so 
long as this movement remains strong, 
"Crackpots and others who want to 
overthrow our way of life will not 
succeed." 

President Truman's appearance was 
the highlight of the affair. Few knew 
he was coming until Meany an- 
nounced that a committee of the Ex- 
ecutive Council had gone out to "es- 



cort into this hall a great American 
and a great friend of the little people." 

Wlien Truman came in a moment 
later, pandemonium followed. Guests 
cheered, whistled, pounded tables, 
and clapped hands as the Chief Ex- 
ecu ti\'e walked to the dais. They re- 
peated the outburst when he was 
formally introduced. Truman made 
his talk brief. 

"I ha\'e been at the 'House' all even- 
ing working on two more messages to 
Congress," he said. "I was sitting 
there thinking of this celebration for ■ 
a great labor statesman and I just ' 
couldn't stay away. 

"I remember Gompers distinctly as 
the originator of a great movement 
which set labor free. 

"I remember when he passed away. 
That was the year I was defeated for 
re-election— and they haven't suc- 
ceeded in doing that to me since." 

The sally about his victories brought 
a burst of laughter, which was re- 
peated when Truman declared: "Gom- 
pers was not only a labor statesman, 
in bipartisan sense, but as good a 
Democrat as I was." 

"I consider it a high honor," Tru- 
man said, in closing, "to be asked to 
pay tribute to one of the greatest 
leaders who ever lived." 

As Truman left, the audience gave 
him a third demonstration that shook 
the rafters. 

Serious, extended eulogies to Gom- 
pers were delivered by two of his 
long-time associates— President Will- 
iam Green, and Vice-President Mat- 
thew Woll. Green has ably piloted 
the Federation since Gompers' death. 

Green told how young Sam came 
from the slums of London to the tene- 
ments of New York City; how he 
learned the trade of cigarmaking, and 
while stni a youngster fought to build 
the Cigarmakers' union so as to wipe 
out the sweatshop conditions under 
which the toilers of his craft labored. 



J 



THE CARPENTER 15 

Green described Gompers' achieve- Green said. "It is the kind of organ- 
ments as president of the Cigarmak- ization in which any free nation may 
ers, and recounted how he spear- take pride. It is part of the Hfestream 
headed the creation of the A. F. of L. of American democracy." 
in an era when workers had to strug- ,^, „ n i >-, , , 
gle every inch of the way with "cap- J^""^} '^""^^^^^ Gompers champion- 
tains of industry who were strong ^^^P °^ the prmciples of action by the 
and ruthless " workers through free, voluntary. 

From 50,000 members in 1881, the ^on-governmental bodies. It was his 

Federation grew to three million by conviction that no lasting gain has 

the time Gompers' died and to almost ^^^^ ^«"^« *^«"^ compulsion." 

eight million today, Green pointed "The life and labors of Gompers," 

out. Woll added, "impressively dramatize 

"The organization he built stands the greatness of American democ- 

today unchanged in basic principles," racy."— Labor 



Canadian Labor Demands Action on Unemployment 

The Trades and Labor Congress of Canada, in a joint letter concerning the 
unemployment situation to the Prime Minister and the Cabinet, with the 
Canadian Congress of Labor, has asked the Government to "take appropriate 
steps to meet what has become a national emergency." Pointing out "in the 
strongest possible manner" that "the unemployment situation in Canada has 
recently become so serious as to cause grave apprehensions," the letter urges 
the Government to "make the full facts known." 

Though the published figures of claimants on the live unemployment reg- 
ister under the Unemployment Insurance Act for the month of October show 
a 90% increase over those for October, 1948, the regular monthly report on 
claims for benefits under the Act have been withheld for the last three months. 
Since then, it is known, the situation has 'l)ecome drastically worse." The two 
Congresses have protested "most emphatically" against this failure of the Gov- 
ernment to make known the figures on unemployment. 

Reports available at the headquarters of the two Congresses indicate that 
the total now unemployed in Canada is more than 300,000. This would repre- 
sent more than six per cent of the total labor force. Though "it is evident that 
certain Communist groups, following their usual destructive tactics, are en- 
deavoring to exploit the situation," the letter urges the Government not to let 
this "justify any attempt to minimize it." 

The letter, signed by Percy R. Bengough and A. R. Mosher, respectively 
Presidents of The Trades and Labor Congress of Canada and the Canadian 
Congress of Labor, reminds the Government of its repeated references to plans 
for taking care of increased unemployment. "We believe the time has come, if 
it is not in fact overdue, when these plans should be put into effect," said the 
letter, "and if they are not sufficient to meet the situation, then further steps 
must be taken." 

"The Canadian Labor Movement is determined not to permit a repetition 
of the 'Hungry Thirties," the letter concluded. 



5IP 



THE REAL EXPERTS 

According to a recent newspaper article, 
people are pawning their possessions at a 
much faster rate than tliey were last year. 
Now maybe the economists and statisticians 
have better yardsticks for measuring nation- 
al prosperity than pawn shop transactions, 
but for our money we will stick by the hock 
shop formula. \Vlien people have money 
they buy things. ^Vhen tliey run out of 
money, they take the things to "Honest 
Ben" or "Uncle Jake" for a buck or two in 
a hurry. The college professors may know a 
lot about what is going on in the nation, 
but "Honest Ben" or "Uncle Jake" knows 
more about what is going on in his own 
community than everyone else combined. 
When the pawn shop ovniers announced 
that articles for pawn are increasing, it is a 
lead pipe cinch that prosperity is slipping. 

The traditional sign of the pawn shop 
is three balls hung over the door. In case 
you don't know what the sign means, you 
might as well accept Joe Paup's version. 
He says it means, "Two to one you don't 
get it back." i^ ^ i^ 

SAD BUT TRUE 

Ignorance of the law is no excuse. Neither 
does it prevent the losing lawyer from col- 
lecting anyhow. 



SUNNV 




© 1949 (TaCC StAMa^iTZ 



PRESIDENT 




Sr/JMiy/Tz 



**! shoulda known that you can't 
ignore a union man's rights!" 



"The boss was so mad he ate the 
imioR contract, but he still found 
it binding!" 

^ ¥ -¥■ 

THE POOR CAN'T WIN 

With the budget now running heavily in 
the red, revisions in our tax program seem to 
be a foregone conclusion. Knowing this, the 
Big Business interests have already launched 
a program designed .to sell the nation on the 
idea that less of the tax load ought to be 
carried by the rich and more of it should be 
saddled on the backs of the poor. Recently 
a pamphlet bristling witli all sorts of fancy 
statistics "proving" this point came to our 
attention. After a close half-hour perusal of 
the pamphlet, we came to the conclusion it 
was a flop; it was too complicated to under- 
stand, and too small to vnrap our lunch in. 
In the end, all we could think of was the 
old one about the real estate agent's son 
who kept hearing his dad talk about deals 
involving millions. 

One day the son came home and proudly 
announced: "Dad, I sold the dog." 

"What for?" asked the father. 

"For $10,000." rephed the boy. 

"Where's the money?" continued the fa- 
ther. 

"Oh, I didn't sell him for money," tlie lad 
explained. "I traded him for tvvo $5,000 cats." 



THE CARPENTER 17 



McGinnis and the Union Label 

(Submitted by D. C. Noldy, Pres. Washington, D. C. District Council) 

Mr. John W. McGinnis was for unions all the way; 

He favored larger wages and a somewhat shorter day. 

A walk-out always pleased him though he didn't have a cent. 

But when the delegate said strike, McGinnis always went. 

He did the shopping for his wife because he liked to know 

That naught save the union articles were purchased with his dough. 

Has it got the union label? McGinnis used to say, 

Has it got the union label? Show it to me if you're able. 

If it hasn't got the label take the bloomin' thing away. 

McGinnis had no children though he hoped to have some day, 
And his wife who "seen her duty" was opinioned the same way. 
So when the stork arrived one day and brought a bouncing boy, 
McGinnis was elated— he was overcome with joy. 
He looked the baby over— his face wreathed in a grin- 
When all at once a thought occurred which filled him with chagrin. 

Has it got the union label? McGinnis used to say. 

Has it got the union label? Show it to me if you're able. 

If it hasn't got the label take the bloomin' thing away. 

Now John W. McGinnis was a man of good repute; 

He went to church on Sunday in his union tailored suit. 

Like so many other union men, he led a blameless life. 

And when he died the neighbors said "the blow will kill his wife." 

He reached the pearly gate on time as upright spirits do; 

"Welcome," was Peter's greeting, and "I have a harp for you." 

Has it got the union label? McGinnis used to say, 

Has it got the union label? Show it to me if you're able. 

If it hasn't got the label take the bloomin' thing away. 



A UNIQUE BILL It will be interesting to follow the pro- 

A freshman Congressman last month in- ff^ "^ J^ b^"- ^H'^^- *^'^ .^'."° f""^^ 

troduced in the House a bill which would, ^"^ *^* *« overwhelmmg majority of our 

.£ 1 • u r^„ ^..^^o 4^^ fii^ Congressmen are scrupulously honest, at the 

if passed, require all Congressmen, to fale * ^. , i -n ■ i ^ i i i r 

r n J 1 . 1 ,4. ^r „ii • same time such a bill might be handy tor 

a full and complete annual report ot all m- .. ,i i r fi . xr .i 

come, including retainer fees from law separating the sheep from the goats. If noth- 

partnerships. The latter kind of income has ^"g ^^'f ^l J^^^t this subject gives us an 

caused some raised eyebrows on Capitol excuse for bringing up a story we like about 

TTii rr i- u • „ • +-^ a bookkeeper who was being tried tor em- 

HiU. It a corporation or business association , ,. , ^.^ .„. , ,, 

hands out money to a legislator who is a bezzhng half a mil ion dollars over a twenty 

lawyer, the matter could be construed as a l^^' P^""^ f^°"^ ^lie corporation employing 
bribe. On the other hand, if the legislator ^™" 

is a lawyer and has a law firm back home, After listening to all the testimony, the 

the firm can take "retainer fees" from com- J^dge said to the defendant: It seems vety 

panics and associations on the theory that f Grange to me that you could keep on rob- 

it is giving "legal services" in exchange, a ^ing that corporation for so long without 

neat arrangement for any politicos who being caught. 

might value a dollar more than personal "Well," replied the defendant, "the cor- 

integrity. poration was pretty busy itself." 



18 



The Role of Workers' Education 



MARK STARR 
Educational Director I.L.G.W.U. 

I 

"As the city grev: dyrlrig tlie latter half of the nineteentli centurii. insanitary 
conditions increased. It v:as a common practice to tlirou: garbage and papers 
into the street. Youngsters earned a feic coins tv standing at Broadu-ay near 
City Sail icitJi a iroom and, ichen a mayi or a icoman icanted to cross the 
street, they icould sweep a path through the muck." (Xeic York Times, ]^av. 
19. 1948) 

THIS XEWS STORY, incidental to the fact that New York was re\is- 
ing its old sanitan' code, seems innocuous enough. If, however, an alert 
teacher in Xew York City public schools were to use it in his civics 
class to explain that the private enterprise of the small bo}-s picking up pennies 
for ser\"ice with their brooms had perforce to be replaced by the public enter- 
prise of a permanent City Board of Health, that might be dangerous for his 
record and professional advancement. If he were further to show that private 
enterprise, when dangerous, has had to be regulated and in some cases to be 
replaced by public o^^^lership and operation of basic services, and that this 
process might have to be repeated, he would onh- deepen his crime. For even 
in Xew York Cit\- the intellectual un- 



denvorld of frightened reaction in- 
fluences teachers, principals and 
supervisors; and some members of 
the Board of Education might re- 
gard such speculations as dangerous 
thoughts. 

In contrast, effecti\-e workers' edu- 
cation must continually point out the 
inconsistencies of our social life (for 
example, X'ew York teachers who 
must teach cleanliness to their stu- 
dents despite the lack of soap and 
towels in the school washroom) and 
study the present to help build the 
future. Such critical alertness to chal- 
lenge and change is, of course, the 
basis of all good teaching procedures. 

A time-honored stor}- about the dif- 
ference between workers' education 
and other forms runs thus: A diligent 
teacher in a home economics class 
had given a good lesson upon the 



nutritive values of soup bones ob- 
tained for a few pennies at the 
butcher shop. She paused at the 
end to ask for questions and finally 
one gaimt Scotch lady at the back 
of the classroom demanded, "\Mio had 
the meat off those bones in the first 
place?" It is such probing and dis- 
turbing questions which workers' edu- 
cation must ask about our social sys- 
tem if it is to fill its roll as intellectual 
d\Tiamite. blazing the way through 
outmoded institutions to more dem- 
ocratic and just ways of li\'ing. It is 
this disturbing quality which makes 
workers' education suspect, both to 
the cloistered academic and the satis- 
fied supporter of the status quo. 

In Britain workers' education, as 
advocated by the Xational Council 
of Labor Colleges, made its slogan 
"Education for Emancipation." The 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



movement in other European coun- 
tries was also linked to the advocacy 
of social changes by consent. In the 
United States this phase has never 
been stressed because the circum- 
stances are different. The intellectual 
climate and the alignment of the con- 
tending social groups and forces re- 
flects a different geographic, eco- 
nomic and historic environment, the 
analysis of which goes beyond the 
scope of this article. But the chal- 
lenge of workers' education to ortho- 
dox education and the institutions 
which it supports is not by any means 
absent in the U.S.A. 

II 

Instead of the Three R's of the old- 
fashioned public school, workers' edu- 
cation might well be listed as teaching 
the Three D's, First of all, workers' 
education is a necessary discipline. 
In this age, when students "get by," 
when lecturers must be vaudeville 
artists, when wisdom must be trans- 
lated into would-be wise-cracks, when 
a deadly corrosion and a sapping of 
our moral fibre are indicated by the 
give-away radio shows, the sugges- 
tive sexy nature of our tabloid news- 
papers and by many of our movies- 
such a discipline is vitally necessary. 
While the Harvard Report may not 
have evoked general consent in every 
particular, its reference to the ever- 
increasing and unprecedented debili- 
tation of the public mind by radio, 
mOvies, newspapers and comics com- 
pel general approval. 

Elsewhere the writer in a paper, 
"The Menace of Social Illiteracy," has 
described the dangerous competition 
now faced by the modern educator 
in the mass media of communication 
just mentioned which now overshad- 
ow the home, school and church in 
the formation of public opinion. We 
all see the long lines of eager, excited 
kids outside our movies on Saturday 



mornings for the doubtful fare pro- 
vided. When, as now, television en- 
ables us to hear and see more about 
beer or to watch two otherwise 
grown-up men nose peanuts across 
the contest floor to win the sponsor's 
product, men's inventive genius seems 
perverted to futility. One pathetically 
recalls Hamlet's "W^hat a piece of work 
is man! ... in form and moving how 
express and admirable!" 

In confirmation of the writer's anx- 
iety, the summary given by J. Donald 
Adams in the New York Times Book 
Review (Sept. 12, 1948) may be cited: 

"Our favorite recreational reading deals 
in elaborately concocted means of murder- 
ing each other; the movies are still search- 
ing for the ultimate in violence that can 
be crowded into an hour and a half on the 
screen; the last thing you will find in the 
comics is a laugh; the picture magazines 
are apparently determined to probe the re- 
lation between the seeing eye and the quiet 
stomach. No sooner have we adjusted our- 
selves with a released monster in the form 
of atomic energy than we are bombarded 
with books telling us that even if we escape 
atomic and biological warfare, the human 
race is a gone goose anyway unless it stops 
plundering its resources, and pronto. 

"The opinion poll— one of the smartest 
conjuring stunts the Devil has thought up 
since he started in business— tells us what 
we think even before we have made up our 
minds. (Written before Nov. 2, 1948.) It 
is only one phase of our favorite sport of 
frightening one another with statistics, which 
are the inost grotesque false-faces made in 
our time. If ever we take to worshiping bra- 
zen images, ours will be a monstrous neon 
numeral set up in Times Square and its 
country- wide equivalents. A statistician's 
handful of incipient exhibitions and confes- 
sion-starved individuals submits to detailed 
questioning on its sex habits, and the pub- 
lished results are received like a carved tab- 
let from Sinai." 

Workers' education helps the work- 
er, despite the pressure of making a 
living and the many claims upon his 
leisure, to take himself in hand and 
make serious and consecutive study 



20 



THE CARPEXTER 



of some dndsion of the social sciences 
or to acquire skills in public speaking 
and parliamentary law and political 
activit}' by the tool course of the 
workers' education program. Impor- 
tantly, such study is usually made by 
groups, composed of individuals shar- 
ing the same problems. The advan- 
tages of group approach as contrasted 
with the solitary burning of the mid- 
night oil are ob\"ious to all who ha\'e 
enjoyed the stimulation of group dis- 
cussion by adults of wide and di\'er- 
sified experience and under compe- 
tent guidance. 

Such groups at their best accept 
the creed of W. K. Clifford, the Brit- 
ish scientist, who said that we should 
try "to do as weU as possible what 
we can do best; to work for the im- 
provement of the social organization; 
to seek earnestly after truth and only 
to accept pro^-isionally opinions one 
has not enquired into; to regard men 
as comrades in work and their free- 
dom as a sacred thing; in fact, to rec- 
ognize the enormous and fearful dff- 
ference between truth and falsehood, 
right arid wrong, and how truth and 
right are to be got b}' free enquiry 



The immediate purpose of workers' 
education in the U.S.A. is to train for 
trade imion service. In vocational ed- 
ucation workers hope to learn more 
to earn more; but increased technical 
education, helping the worker to pro- 
duce more, does not mean that the 
workers as such get more. \\'orkers' 
education is also differentiated from 
hobbies and the stud\" of the humani- 
ties by its practical application for 
group purposes. Courses for n e w 
members, training for union officers, 
the specialized study of the econom- 
ics of given industries and the histor}- 
of particular unions and of the gen- 
eral labor movement with analvsis of 



their structure and functioning enjoy 
priority. Summer institutes, sometimes 
utilizing the staff and plant of colleges 
and universities, seem the most effec- 
tive agency in recent years. Most 
progress is made when the unions on 
a national or state level set up their 
own educational departments, which 
make articulate the unions' needs, and 
participate in preparation and execu- 
tion of educational programs when 
cooperation is given by the institu- 
tions of higher learning. 

An evaluation of the experiments 
aheady made by some 60 institutions 
of higher learning in the field of labor 
relations has been made by Caroline 
Ware in "Labor and the Universities" 
(American Labor Education Senice, 
1946;. Such cooperation has its o\^tl ■ 
dangers as recently ex-posed at the ' 
L'niversit}- of Michigan. Here a suc- 
cessful Workers Education Extension 
project, serving some 60,000 trade 
unionists, was suspended and its 
leader dismissed because of com- 
plaints instigated by General Motors. ' 
At present \\Titing, the project has 
been re\ived but has been robbed of 
its pre\-ious freedom to experiment, 
its flexibilit}- to carr}- classes into the 
workshop and union haU and of its 
originating personnel. 

Ill 

Workers' education should, in the 
second place, be a directive. So far, in 
the United States, the labor unions 
and their leaders, under the early and 
continuing influence of Samuel Gom- 
pers, have prided themselves upon 
ha\-ing no philosophy and no agreed 
ultimate aims. Thus they proved that 
they were native to the pragmatic ch- 
mate of the U.S.A. However, this 
phase is passing— for the trade unions 
and indeed for the United States it- 
self. The labor movement generally 
must begin to formulate aims which 
will direct its action for the next cen- 



THE CARPENTER 



21 



tury and more. When unions were 
small, their relation to the community, 
the nation and the world was not so 
important; they could operate safely 
by rule of thumb. But what over 15 
million workers and their relatives do 
—since the New Deal decade brought 
Labor unprecedented strength— h a s 
significance and can no longer be left 
to instinctive reactions. 

Because orthodox educational insti- 
tutions do not feel or understand the 
motivation of the labor movement and 
do not, except in rare cases, sympa- 
thize with the aims and ideals of or- 
ganized labor, they cannot of them- 
selves give this directive. Even if they 
were able to formulate a philosophy 
for Labor, it is not likely that it would 
be accepted with confidence. A new 
outlook cannot be an intellectual 
hand-me-down. Movements, like men, 
have to sweat out their own philoso- 
phy and apply it if it is to mean any- 
thing. 

To be anti-Communist or anti-Fas- 
cist is not enough. Labor must have 
a positive program. Despite the fact 
that the leaders of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, the Congress of In- 
dustrial Organizations and the Rail- 
road Brotherhoods all give lip service 
to private enterprise and sometimes 
use collectivism as a threat to recal- 
citrant employers, it seems clear that 
that the philosophy of Labor will be 
based upon and influenced by the 
New Deal experiences of 1933-43. The 
voluntarism of Gompers— who looked 
upon the State with the same sus- 
picion as Herbert Spencer— has been 
eroded rather than abandoned. Never 
again will there be a depression dur- 
ing which the people of the U.S.A. 
will not expect a repetition of the 
remedies improvised during the 
1930's. Never will there be a large- 
scale problem of flood prevention, 



utilization of water-power, and of ir- 
rigation and land conservation with- 
out a reference to the success of the 
TVA. Free enterprise will be ex- 
pected to be responsible free enter- 
prise—responsible to the community 
in which it operates. (The outcry by 
local conservatives in Nashua, N. H., 
against the proposal by Textron and 
its head, Mr. Little, to abandon its 
mills and discharge 3000 workers is 
a current example of the responsibili- 
ty expected.) Free enterprise will in- 
clude both public and private enter- 
prise. The community will conscious- 
ly use the powers of its government 
for welfare purposes. We shall do to- 
gether as citizens through the agency 
of the state what we cannot do as in- 
dividuals. Maybe this will be called 
democratic collectivism and maybe it 
will not be given an accepted label. 
In essence, it will mean social plan- 
ning plus the Bill of Rights. It will 
mean a re-education for us all in our 
concepts of success. It will mean new 
incentives of social service. It will 
mean freedom and security. 

This outlook will be first developed 
by workers' education because it is a 
new force developed from below. 
Nevertheless, all men and women of 
social intelligence in every social stra- 
tum will aid to develop and apply 
this new frame of reference. 

IV 

The other great service of workers' 
education is to serve as a dynamic. 
Group study of problems in workers' 
education fails unless it results in 
group action for their attempted solu- 
tion. It cannot be content with the 
right to ask questions. "Knowledge 
for the sake of knowledge" is equiva- 
lent to saying "garbage cans for the 
sake of garbage cans." Acquirement 
of knowledge by itself is an incom- 
plete procedure. Knowledge must be 
a guide and a spur to action if it is 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



going to rescue itself from sterilit}'. 
The dilettante must be replaced by 
the social activist. Theory and prac- 
tice must ever be in mutual and bene- 
ficial reaction, the one to the other. 
You cannot drive safely by looking 
only in the rear mirror. News from 
the graveyard and philosophic mean- 
darings about past civilization are of 
little help to men and women faced 
with the problems of the insecurity of 
life, the struggle to elevate standards 
of life and the threat of modern war. 

Belief and education should end in 
action. For example, a theoretical be- 
lief in world unity is of little value 
unless we tr}- to make UNESCO func- 
tion effectively. Education should not 
only teach us what to do but how to 
do it; not only how to think but what 
to think in such a way as to influence 
oiu" fellow citizens. In all this, of 
course, education can become per- 
nicious if directed to create antagon- 
ism against another group. This dan- 
ger we have seen demonstrated at 
great peril and with immeasurable 
cost to humanity in the Fascist and 
Soviet states. In the U. S. A. also we 
must be aware of the same danger 
arising from the activity of our pro- 
fessional patriots who would inter- 
pret patriotism as the hatred of other 
peoples' countries instead of love of 
their own. Nero fiddling while Rome 
burned seems, in comparison, a harm- 
less pyromaniac compared to those 
who, after Hiroshima, still hymn na- 
tionalist hates and rivalries. Surely 
in a world in which technical science 
has split the atom, social science must 
unite that world and quickh'! 

Education, as the tongues in Aesop's 
fable, can be the best and the worst 
thing in the world. Education which 
aimlessly distracts our attention to 
trifles; education which poisons with 
ideas of nationalist and racial superi- 



ority ond sovereignty'; and even edu- 
cation which is fixed in a fluid world 
—all are positive dangers. 

These are the Three D's of workers' 
education; as a discipline, a directive 
and a d>Tiamic, which give it an im- 
portant role in our endeavor to de- 
fend, build and enrich Democracy. 
One should not, however, expect too 
much from the beginnings of workers' 
education but it will serve as a leaven 
in the workers' movement despite the 
relative poverty of its present facilities 
relative to its potentiality. The per- 
version of mass media to distraction 
and amusement creates definite ob- 
stacles to workers' education. Yet it 
is encouraging to report that the mod- 
em mass media are being influenced 
by the great advance of Labor which 
began so notedly in 1933. Some of 
these media, including the "comics," 
are being sublimated. Labor is at- 
taining a sense of responsibility equiv- 
alent to its increased power. The 
experience of the Taft-Hartley Act 
convinced it that what the govern- 
ment could give, the government 
could take away, and that Labor 
would have to think out new meth- 
ods and aims in political action. Al- 
ready it has increased participation 
by union members in the privilege of 
voting. Labor is anxious and willing 
to improve its own organization and 
to improve the techniques of Labor- 
Management cooperation. It is anx- 
ious to study the function of labor 
unions in industries and ser^aces 
owned or operated by public bodies. 
It is willing to replace the oldtime 
psychology of conflict with a new 
psychology of cooperation. It is pre- 
pared to exercise a constructive in- 
fluence in industry which intelligent 
Management will welcome. All these 
trends make workers' education in- 
dispensable in building and defend- 
ing real democracy. 



Editorial 




The Story Has Never Been Told 

The battle of organized labor to protect the rights and interests of working 
people is a never ending one. It goes on day in and day out. All too few 
people— and unfortunately this is almost as true of union members as it is of 
the general public— realize how far flung and involved are the efforts unions 
make to promote the welfare of the people who belong to them. A thousand 
times a day one union or another goes to bat for a member who was discharged 
without just cause. Hardly any hour of any working day goes by but what 
some union uses its good offices to secure back pay or unpaid wages or proper 
seniority for some member or members. 

Everyone realizes that unions concern themselves with bettering wages 
and working conditions as much as possible. But the small though highly 
important services which unions perform day in and day out for the protec- 
tion of individual members often go unnoticed and unsung. Just the other 
day a member of a Local Union in California received a dividend of some- 
thing like $23,000 from his union membership. Seriously injured in an acci- 
dent, he became unable to follow his trade. A paltry $1,800 was the best set- 
tlement Workmen's Compensation Insurance offered him. However, that was 
before the union took up his case. After the union took up his case the picture 
changed completely. After a good deal of negotiating, the union finally came 
out with a settlement that will pay the member nearly $25,000 in the next 
few years. 

Nor is there anything unusual in this case. The story has been repeated 
a thousand times in difiFerent sections of the nation since Workmen's Compen- 
sation Insurance became the law of the land through the untiring efforts of 
organized labor. 

Only recently organized labor in the states of Washington and California 
succeeded in overthrowing a pernicious ruling that was beating numerous 
unemployed workers out of unemployment insurance. In both states the un- 
employment insurance departments handed down rulings that idle workers 
drawing down jobless benefits were not entitled to such benefits if and when 
the unions to which they belonged went on strike in the plants where they 
formerly worked. Althought the men may have been laid off because of slack- 
ness of business long before the strikes occurred, the state authorities ruled 
nevertheless that they were not entitled to benefits because if they had been 
working at the time the strikes were called they would have walked out. 
Such far fetched and illogical reasoning only emphasizes how far some state 
authorities will go in an effort to beat down claims of working people. It 
would seem quite as logical to convict for murder a man who lived on the 
east coast because he was once the pal of two men who committed a murder 
on the west coast. 

However, there is a happy ending to the story. Organized labor in the 
two states did not take the rulings lying down. All unions in the state pro- 

(Continued on page 26) 




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26 THE CARPENTER 

(Continued from page 23) 

tested vehemently, contending that under such decisions, only idle workers 
wilhng to "scab" could qualify for unemployment insurance benefits. Further, 
labor chiefs contended such rulings violated the minimum standards laid down 
in the Federal Social Security Act. 

State unemployment insurance systems must meet these standards in order 
to qualify for Federal tax credits under the internal revenue credit. Denial of 
such credits means employers in the state involved would have to pay both 
the state and Federal unemployment insm^ance levies on payrolls. 

Imposition of the penalty was averted when representatives of the states, 
at hearings called by Secretary of Labor Maurice J. Tobin, agreed to alter the 
rulings and abide by the Federal standards. As a result, Tobin certified both 
states as in conformity with Federal law, and hence entitled to unemployment 
insurance credits for 1950. 

The story of what organized labor has done and is doing to make the lot of 
all people, particularly working people, happier and better would fill many, 
many books. It is a story that has never been properly told. Perhaps it never 
will be. In the end, it probably does not matter too much. So long as unions 
continue serving as they have in the past, they will undoubtedly continue to 
flourish and prosper. • 

Let's Separate The Sheep From The Goats 

Before the second session of the 81st Congress was more than a couple of 
weeks old, the working people of the nation won a significant victory in the 
House of Representatives. The victorious vote did not call for an increase in 
Social Security benefits, nor did it repeal the obnoxious Taft-Hartley Law. 
What it did do was insure that democratic procedure shall prevail in the House 
—something that may, in the long run, prove even more important, since with- 
out it no progressive legislation would have any chance of passing. 

For a good many years the Rules Committee maintained a virtual dictator- 
ship over new legislation in the House. Before any bill could be brought up 
on the floor of the House for action, it was necessary for the bill to clear the 
Rules Committee first. Time after time good measures were bottled up and 
sti"angled in this committee, and there was nothing anyone could do about it. 
All that the hundreds of Representatives elected by the people in democratic 
elections could do was sit around biting their nails if some half dozen mem- 
bers of the Rules Committee chose to sit on a bill. 

However, after the fine showing made by labor at the polls in 1948, the 
complexion of Congress was changed considerably. The progressive forces in 
the House were strengthened considerably. By a substantial majority, the first 
House session of the current Congress voted to rescind the Rules Committee 
dictatorship and substitute in its stead a new rule which permitted the chair- 
man of any standing committee to bring on the floor of the House any bill 
which was favorably acted on by his committee, provided that the Rules Com- 
mittee had not done so within a three week period. But for this democratic 
rule revision, much of the favorable legislation passed by the House last year 
would never have seen the light of day. It would have died in the Rules Com- 
mittee. 

In a surprise move right after Congress went back into session last month, 
the reactionary elements started a move to abolish the democratic new rule 
and substitute in its stead the old Rules Committee dictatorship which existed 



THE CARPENTER 27 

for many years. They almost succeeded, but after a hard fight they were voted 
down by a small margin. So the democratic rule stays in for the time being 
at least. Labor led the democratic fight. 

Frank Edwards, AFL commentator, in a broadcast last month revealed how 
vicious the old Rules Committee gag actually was. Somehow or other he ob- 
tained an actual transcription of a meeting at which the Rules Committee re- 
form was being discussed. Edwards played a portion of the transcription over 
the air. Millions of people must have heard Senator Cox admitting that it was 
not unusual for a Congressman to approach the Rules Committee and ask that 
the committee bottle up a bill for which the Congressman was supposedly 
working. In other words, the Rules Committee gag rule gave unscrupulous 
Congressmen a chance to go on record FOR a bill while actually they worked 
AGAINST it. 

That such chicanery should go on in the greatest legislative body in the 
world is a little bit disillusioning. However, it seems to be a not uncommon 
practice. There are all sorts of tricks by which politicians try to do the same 
thing. Every legislative procedure that permits Congressmen to pose as sheep 
while acting like goats ought to be abolished. It ought to be clear to the 
people at all times just exactly where every elected official stands on every 

controversial measure. Altogether too much hedging exists at present. 

• 

Registering — the Biggest Job of All 

by JOSEPH D. KEENAN, Director Labor's League for Political Education 

The International Unions and national, state and local organizations of the 
AFL have done a magnificent job of getting the truth to their eight million 
members about the legislative issues and the voting records of their Congress- 
men. Through the labor press, radio programs, League rallies and local union 
meetings, through word of mouth by shop stewards and League volunteer 
workers, our AFL membership is getting more and better political informa- 
tion than ever before. The majority of our members now have sound opinions 
about their Congressmen. They know which are good and which are bad. 

But when it comes to putting that opinion into action at the polls, we have 
to be very humble. 

The story of Vincent Murphy, Secretary of the New Jersey Federation, is 
now legend. A few years ago Murphy took a bad licking when he ran for gover- 
nor. But before the ballots were counted, everyone was confident that he would 
win. All they had to do was add up the number of union members in New 
Jersey, and it was obvious that the unions alone had enough votes to elect him. 

What went wrong? Murphy conducted an investigation . . . one of the 
first of its kind in the country. He found that the AFL members had not voted 
against him. Instead, they just didn't vote at all. Less than a third of the AFL 
members were registered. Of these only about one half voted on election day. 
Murphy got only one of every sLx potential AFL votes. But as the final 
clincher, Murphy discovered that his two chief campaign managers were NOT 
REGISTERED, and could not vote for him. 

Don't pass this New Jersey experience off as past history. The same situa- 
tion still exists today in many states and in many unions. Registration drives 
are hard, thankless work. In spite of the great increase in registration achieved 
by our local Leagues in the last two years, surveys show we have just scratched 
the surface. 



28 THE CARPENTER 

For example, a check of the local union membership lists is just being com- 
pleted in Baltimore. The local League reports that in one union only 13 per 
cent of the members are registered. The highest for any local is 50 per cent 
registered. On the average only one out of four union members is registered. 

Is that bad? No, it is typical . . . unfortunately. The bright side to the story 
is that the Baltimore League is doing something about it. By starting early, 
they will have eveiy Baltimore union member's name checked and catalogued 
on file cards six months ahead of the final registration date. They know it will 
take that long to get results. 

How will they get their Baltimore members all registered? First, a dupli- 
cate card for every unregistered member v^ill be sent to his respective local 
union secretary. It is up to each secretary to get in touch with his unregistered 
members. This can be done in person, by mail or through the shop stewards. 
Some unions have political stewards for each shop to do the job. 

As members get themselves registered, their cards will be sent back to the 
central LLPE office. If the local union is unsuccessfvil in getting all members 
registered, the cards for the unregistered members will be turned o\'er to the 
League precinct committeemen to go to work on. 

Finally, the members whose names are still in the "unregistered file" will 
get a concentration of appeal from all sides when night registration in each 
precinct is temporarily authorized in Baltimore this summer. 

It is the local union officers who must carry the load in this registration 
drive all over the country. But to no one is the job more important. If they 
don't do the job, the difference will show up in dollars and cents . . . dollars 
and cents less in the contracts they negotiate . . . dollars and cents more in 
legal fees to fight vicious labor laws and court decisions. 

Many unions have developed their own techniques for getting their mem- 
bers registered. There is a local union in Kansas that turned the job over to 
the women's auxiliary . . . needless to say they got an absolute 100 per cent 
registration. In one Ohio county the building trades locals check the registra- 
tion of members before sending them out on jobs. There is one AFL Interna- 
tional Union that requires registration as a condition of membership. The job 
can be done. All it takes is a little imagination and a lot of hard work. 

In my travels around the country, I have heard a disturbing new line passed 
out by the reactionaries and taken seriously by some of our peox^le. The line 
is that this fellow or that feUow can't be beaten . . . that we can't find a good 
enough candidate . . . that it takes too much money to win. If we had listened 
to that line in 1948, Joe Ball couldn't have been beaten. Revercomb couldn't 
have been beaten. Hubert Humphrey and Paul Douglas would not now be 
United States Senators. All of these were hundred to one shots, but the voters 
on election day proved the crepe hangers and the pollsters wrong. 

We did more in 1948 than we had ever done before in carrying our end of 
the load on election day. But we can and must do much better. The biggest job 
of all is getting every AFL member registered to be a voter on election day. 

When we have done our part in making sure that all of our members are 
qualified and informed voters, we can insist that the political parties put forth 
liberal candidates worthy of our support. Then and only then can we say 
that we are effectively carrying out the Gompers policy of "rewarding our 
friends and defeating our enemies." 



THE LOCKER 

By JOHN HART, Local Union 366, New York, N. Y. 



Check books being very commonly used nowadays, we're giving this check business 
a going-over for the benefit of those not already familiar with the set-up. This information 
applies generally to all checks, but Special Checking Accounts because of their usually 
small balances may have slightly varying regulations. 



New York Feb. 1, 1950 

CORN EXCHANGE BANK TRUST COMPANY 1-45 

Burnside Branch 

Pay to 

the order oi^-Fred Green $9.no/oo 

--Nine and no/oo dollars. 

James Lee 



Fred Green is called the payee of the above check. James Lee is the maker. 

The number 1-45 is the bank's code nimiber. When a check is deposited this number 
is noted before the amount on tlie deposit slip, which eliminates the necessity of writing 
the full name and location of The Corn Exchange Bank. 

This check is worthless until Fred Green endorses it exactly as made out. If made 
payable to Freddy Greene, the endorsement must read that way. Green should sign his 
name in the correct way directly underneath. The proper place for endorsement is on 
the back, left end. It is still O. K. if placed elsewhere. 

The words PAY TO THE ORDER OF make this a negotiable paper. Once endorsed 
by Green The Corn Exchange will pay nine dollars to any other person in proper poss- 
ession. Re-endorsements may run all tlie way to the bottom. Payment will be made to 
the last endorser provided the check is otherwise acceptable. 

If Green intends to deposit this check he should immediately write on the back FOR 
DEPOSIT ONLY. A check so marked cannot be cashed if lost or stolen. 

Green might want to cash it at Lee's bank. He endorses it, and Lee writes underneath 
—Signature O. K. James Lee. Using discretion, the bank will cash it. 

If Green doubts the worth of this check, Lee has it stamped CERTIFIED by his bank. 
Enough funds are set aside from Lee's account to cover the check, which will be used to 
make payment only on this check when presented. 

If Green can't sign his name because of illiteracy or disability he endorses wdth an X 
in the presence of two witnesses, something like this: 

Fred Green X his mark. Witnesses to his mark: Joseph Brown (Address) 

Robert White (Address) 

Green must make the X himself or touch the pen while another makes it. 

If the above check was undated. Green may date it only for the day received. 

A check dated for a Sunday or holiday is a legal check. 

A post-dated check cannot be deposited or cashed until tliat date arrives. 

If your check book is not available you may use a blank check by filling in the name 
and location of your bank. These blank checks are available at most business places for 
that purpose. A check make out on a piece of white paper of ordinary check size can be 
used in an emergency, if tlie payee accepts it. 

It is not advisable to use the check of another bank by crossing out the name and sub- 
stituting that of your own bank. This could be considered an altered check. Banks are not 
obligated to accept any altered check. 

Number your checks consecutively for identification, if not numbered already. 
Write in the amount in the stub first. If you wrote the check first you might forget the 
stub and have no record as to the amount and payee. 



30 THE CARPENTER 

Write the figures close to the $ sign and the written amount close up to the left, with a 
stroke before, and a long line after. This is a safeguard against what is called filling. Make 
a line after the payee's name also. 

If your figures read $13.00 and the writing Fifteen dollars your bank can legally pay 
off on the written amount. Usually such checks are returned. 

Always make your signature in the same way, and preferably with the same style pen. 
Your bank has one signatm-e on file. Stick to that one. 

Any information as to what the check is for, may be put in the lower left comer or on 
the back over the endorsement line. This acts as a receipt. 

Don't make a check payable to CASH or BEARER. Anyone can cash it easily. 

Don't make a habit of signing blank checks. They may be lost or stolen. 

Payment of a check may be stopped by telegram or phone if later confirmed in writing. 
After it has been recorded paid by your bank it is too late. 

The death of the maker before the check is presented makes it unpayable. 

Don't make erasm-es on any important part of a check. It may be refused. 

If you deposit checks to the amount of $100.00 on Monday you cannot draw on these 
funds on Tuesday. You must wait a few days until they have been cleared through and 
collected and the amount is entered to your credit. 

When depositing bills give the teller a break. Keep the largest bills on top, face up and 
looking front. The smallest bills should be on the bottom. 

Among the many reasons for a check's return are Post dated, (dated ahead) Stale dated, 
(old check) Endorsement wrong, Alteration, Filling, Signature incorrect. Maker deceased. 
And the most common of all, INSUFFICIENT FUxNDS. 

You are not expected to write a foolproof check. You are expected to be reasonably care- 
ful. You stand the loss if carelessness or irregularity on your part is responsible for it. PLAY 
SAFE AND WATCH YOUR BALANCE. 



Wm. L. Hutcheson to Aid Heart Drive 

General President Wm. L. Hutcheson, will serve as a member of the 
National Labor Committee of the 1950 Heart Campaign, it was announced 
last month. 

The $6,0(X),000 fund-raising drive wil take place during the month of 
February and will be conducted by the American Heart Association, and its 
aflBliates throughout the country, to support a program of scientific research, 
public education and community servdce. 

In a letter addressed to President Hutcheson, inviting his cooperation, Sec- 
retary of Labor Maurice J. Tobin, Chairman of the National Labor Commit- 
tee's 1950 Heart Campaign, wrote: 

"Diseases of the heart and blood vessels are our nation's leading cause of 
death. They kill more than 600,000 Americans annually and are responsible 
for more deaths than the next five most important causes of death combined." 

Responding to Labor Secretary Tobin's invitation to serve with him as a 
member of the Committee, President Hutcheson stated: 

"I desire to express my gratitude in your extending to me an invitation to 
serve with you as a member of the National Labor Committee in aiding the 
success of the 1950 Heart Campaign. Being desirous and willing at all times 
to assist mankind in every possible way, I accept your invitation.' 



31 



More Wages Mean More Jobs 

• 

ACROSS THE editorial desk of this journal pass hundreds upon hundreds 
of pieces of mail each week. Some of it is important correspondence 
from Local Unions and State and District Councils, some of it is 
bouquets or brickbats from readers, some of it is information from government 
and labor sources, but a good deal of it is pure propaganda from various 
agencies. In the last five years at least a hundred new propaganda agencies 
have sprung up to promote the welfare of special interest groups. But good 
or bad, all of it has to be read. 

By a strange coincidence, two pieces of mail dealing with the same sub- 
ject were picked up together one day last month. One piece was a postcard 
from a member of the Brotherhood in a medium-sized California city, and the 
other was a copy of the January issue 



of the American Federation of Labor 
Monthly Survey, the bulletin which 
the AFL statistical department pub- 
lishes to keep unions informed of 
economic developments. The post- 
card was short and very much to 
the point. It said: 

"Work is very slack in this area. 
Many men are unemployed and al- 
ready many workers are starting to 
lose their homes and their posses- 
sions. High prices are working a 
great hardship on many people. Can't 
something be done to bring down 
the cost of living?" 

The Monthly Survey takes a look 
at the economic prospects for 1950 
and comes to the conclusion that 
many other sections of the nation 
will feel the same economic pinch 
the workers in the California city 
are already feeling unless purchasing 
power is increased through reason- 
ably substantial wage increases with- 
out price increases. 

Workers look forward to 1950 with 
much concern over the increase in un- 



employment which seems sure to de- 
velop, the AFL Monthly Survey be- 
lieves. 

Prospects for the first 6 months are 
fairly bright, but a slackening of in- 
dustrial activity at least equal to that 
of last summer seems likely in the 
second half year. 

To reach our national goal of main- 
taining "full" production and employ- 
ment, demand for industry's products 
must increase enough each year to 
create jobs for all new workers join- 
ing the labor force and for those laid 
off by labor-saving devices. In 1947 
and 1948 (and during the war) de- 
mand was ample to create these jobs 
and we had "full employment." Gross 
national product in 1947 and 1948 was 
the sum total of all products and ser- 
vices turned out by all industries at 
maximum employment levels. But in 
1949, for the first time in 8 years, 
demand fell short, production drop- 
ped below "full employment" levels 
and unemployment rose by 1,300,000 
(year's average). 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



Prospects are bright for the first 
half year. Total business volume 
should about equal 1949 through 
May or June of 1950. But this will 
not be enough to expand production 
and create jobs for new workers, so 
unemployment in the first half year 
will edge upward, exceeding 1949 by 
perhaps a million. 

A down trend is likely in the sec- 
ond half of 1950. 

The prospective business decline 
after mid-1950 is a challenge to man- 
agement and labor to find a solution 
without an increase in government 
spending. It will test the ability of 
our free enterprise system to main- 
tain "full" production and employ- 
ment. Our economy is strong and 
healthy. Reserves of buying power 
are large, in personal savings, and 
undistributed profits of corporations; 
business working capital is strong. 

We face in 1950 not a depression, 
but another business readjustment 
which need not be disruptive if we 
take the right steps to meet it. Sev- 
eral constructive developments are 
possible. A gradual price decline 
will release more buying power; con- 
tinued spending by business to im- 
prove equipment would maintain em- 
ployment and increase productivity; 
reduction in the many taxes paid by 
consumers would enable them to buy 
more of the durable goods they want 
and need. We do not attempt here 
to list other proposals. A construc- 
tive program could only be worked 
out by competent representatives of 
management, labor and other groups. 

We do however point out some per- 
tinent facts which all working people 
ought to realize: 

A large increase in workers' buying 
will be essential in 1950. If every 
worker in the U. S. could receive a 



10-cent wage increase, some $8,000,- 
000,000 would be added to consumer 
buying power, nearly all of which 
would immediately be spent for liv- 
ing necessities. This would be enough 
to reverse the prospective downward 
trend of business and start a rise. 
But with lower profits in prospect for 
1950, many companies would hesitate 
to give such increases unless earned 
by reducing costs. 

Most American managements have 
never seriously tried to co-operate 
with unions by submitting cost data 
and assuring union members of a fair 
share in the saving that could be 
made by joint eflFort to reduce costs. 
Some amazing results could be ac- 
complished if workers were given 
week by week cost records, so they 
could see the results of their efforts, 
and management agreed to share the 
savings with them, determining the 
just wage increase by collective bar- 
gaining negotiations. 

At least a goal could be set of 7, 
10 or 15 cents more in wages through 
cost reduction. If management recog- 
nized the need for an immediate in- 
crease in workers' buying power and 
agreed to such a program of coopera- 
tive effort to raise wages, the battle 
against business recession would be 
well on the way to victory. It is clear 
of course that wages must be raised 
without causing a general increase in 
living costs. 

Productivity has climbed consis- 
tently ever since the end of the war. 
In the last twelve or fifteen months it 
has climbed ever faster. In that in- 
creased productivity lies the chief 
hope of defeating unemployment. If 
the increased productivity is trans- 
lated into increased purchasing power 
through higher wages, the demand 
for goods can be maintained at a 
level that will insure full employment. 



Official Information 




General 0£Bcers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

Obnbbal Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Gbnebal President 

WM. L. HUTCHBSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



FiBST QlNBBAL TICB-PRBSIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHBSON 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Acting Sbcebtakt 

ALBERT E. FISCHER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 
First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 

111 E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, O. WM. BLAIBR 
933 B. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MDIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the Acting Secretary 

NOTICE 

It is important that the Bond Report of your Trustees, for the six months ending De- 
cember 31, 1949 be completed and returned to the General 0£Bce as soon as possible. 
Blanks for the Reports have been mailed and local unions failing to receive same should 
notify the General Office. 



NEW CHARTERS ISSUED 



3179 Salamanca, New York 1537 

3194 Salamanca, New York 3180 

-1392 New Glasgow, N. S., Canada 1600 

3186 Southampton, Ont., Canada 1601 

'1402 Chicago, Illinois 1603 

1413 Ottawa, Ohio 1617 

1450 Sturgis, Michigan 1619 

1463 Omaha, Nebraska 1621 

1482 Key West, Florida 1681 

1533 Two Rivers, Wisconsin 



Falls City, Nebraska 
Carson, Washington 
Sheetharbour, N. S., Canada 
Little Rock, Arkansas 
Huntsville, Texas 
Greenfield, Indiana 
Picton, Ont., Canada 
Homer, Alaska 
Hornell, New York 



5(n m 



^3tt0rta;m 



Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more 



%t&i in '^tsctt 

Th» Editor has been reqaemted to publiah the natnem 
•/ the following Brotherm who have patted away. 



ROBBERT ADAMS, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
FRANK B. ALLEN, L. U. 207, Chester, Pa. 
JAMES E. ALLEN, L. U. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 
FRANK ALTOBELLO, L. U. 322, Niagara Falls, 

N. Y. 
AARON AUSTIN, L U. 344, Waukesha, Wis. 
MARTIN BAYER, L. U. 64 Louisville, Ky. 
JOSEPH BENSON, L. U. 1441, Canonsburg, 

Pa. 
HERMANN BLUETHNER, L. U. 419, Chicago, 

111. 
ERNEST BRAMER, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 
G. F. BRYANT, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
C. E. BURNS, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 
MARTIN I. BYERLY, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 
VICTOR C. CARRARA, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
E. L. DAY, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 
CILERT DIERKS, L. U. 1784, Chicago, 111. 
EDWARD DOLLATH, L. U, 1784, Chicago, 111. 
HARVEY DRASHER, L. U. 129, Hazelton, Pa. 
ALEX DUTRE, L. U. 8, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BERNARD EKBERG, L. U. 51, Boston, Mass. 
ISADCfRE FEIGEN, L. U. 1976, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
A. L. FERRELL, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
I. A. FRANKLIN, L. U. 627, Jacksonville, Fla. 
ELI GERBICH, L. U. 35, San Rafael, Cal. 
FRANK GRAD, L. U. 416, Chicago, 111. 
JOHN GRANATH, L. U. 11, Cleveland, Ohio 
J, R. GRANT, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 
ED N. HERRING, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
SIMON HOLKEBOER, L. U. 1908, Holland, 

Mich. 
JAMES S. HUGHIE, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
CHESTER L. HUNTLEY, L. U. 710, Long 

Beach, Cal. 
SAM INGRAM, L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 
EDWARD KELLER, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 
HENRY KLITTE, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
ARIE KLUFT, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
TOIVO A. KOSKI, L. U. 2084, Astoria, Ore. 

CORNELIUS LEENHEER, L. U. 325, Paterson, 
N. J. 

JAMES W. LEWIS, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga, 
THEO. LOVEGREN, L. U. 416, Chicago, 111. 
E. J. MC CAULEY, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
MATHIUS MATZZELE, L. U. 246, New York, 
N. Y. 



GEORGE METCALF, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 

WARREN L. METCALF, L. U. 225, Atlanta, 
Ga. 

JACOB MUELLER, L. U. 1307, Evanston, 111. 

PETER E. NELSON, L. U. 1367, Chicago, IlL 

ART NODERER, L. U. 1108, Cleveland, Ohio 

A. R. OAKLEY, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 

W. D. OLIVER, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 

O. G. POHL, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 

EARL PRESTON, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 

ARTHUR W. PRICE, L. U. 696, Tampa, Fla. 

ROBERT RALPH, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 

HANS REICH L. U. 416, Chicago, 111. 

JOHN RERKO, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 

JOSEPH RETZINGER, L. U. 1307, Evanston, 
111. 

WILLIAM H. ROBOTHAM, L. U. 343, Winni- 
peg, Man., Canada 

JOHN ROSE, L. U. 416, Chicago, 111. 

HORACE. P. SALEM, L. U. 8, Philadelphia, Pa. 

JAMES SAYITH, L. U. 8, Philadelphia, Pa. 

ED SCHOOR, L. U. 416, Chicago, 111. 

CLEVELAND SEALS, L. U. 110, St. Joseph, 
Mo. 

ROY L. SIMCOX, L. U. 710, Long Beach, Cal. 

A. C. SMITH, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 

J. D. STIFF, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 

J. L. STOLL, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 

JOHN A. SULLIVAN, L. U. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 

PAT SUMNER, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 

CHARLES SWANDA, L. U. 357, Islip, N. Y. 

FRANK TABER, L. U. 710, Long Beach, Cal. 

A.A. TILLMAN, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 

R. O. B. VOIT, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 

JOSEPH WAGY, L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Texas 

MORPETH WAIN WRIGHT, L. U. 710, Long 
Beach, Cal. 

ANDREW WALTERS, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 

THOMAS WEBSTER, L. U. 710, Long Beach, 
Cal. 

JOSEPH WEDER, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 

C. L. WHITE, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 

DAVID K. WHITE, L. U. 64, LouisvUle, Ky. 

HENRY WESP, L. U. 2178, Jersey City, N. J. 

WM. WINDSOR, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 

HIBBERT WOOD, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 

THOMAS YATES, L. U. 64, Louisville, Ky. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

ALABAMA COUNCIL ENCOURAGING WORKERS' EDUCATION 

The Alabama State Council of Carpenters is encouraging all Local Unions to take ad- 
vantage of the Training Class in Parliamentary Procedure that is being offered for both 
Apprentices and Journeymen. 




This is a photograph of a class from Carpenters' Local Union No. 89 of Mobile, 
Alabama that has completed a course in Parliamentary Procedure as formulated and given 
by the Trades and Industrial Education Division of the Department of the State of Ala- 
bama, under the supervision of H. J. Martin, whose office is located in the University of 
Alabama. Seated from left to right: Phfllip Cuchiron; W. T. Wilson, Trustee; J. E. Steele, 
bama. Seated from left to right:PhilliD Cuchiron; W. T. Wilson, Trustee; J. E. Steele, 
Financial Secretary of Local Union No. 89; C. J. Schandler, President; L. M. Cooper, 
Business Agent; Voidie McLeod, Recording Secretary; Forrest A. Eubanks, Vice-President; 
F. S. Fadre, Treasurer. Standing: W. L. Rickard, State Supervisor of Apprenticeships 
Training of State Department of Education of Alabama; M. E. Blake, Apprenticeship Co- 
ordinator, Mobile Schools, Mobile, Alabama; Henry J. Martin, State Supervisor of Car- 
penter Training of the State of Alabama; M. L. Legg, member of Local Union 89; J. E. 
Grant; J. A. Jemigan; E. E. Swanson; Grady N. Webber. All those in the picture are 
members of Local Union 89 except the officials as above indicated from the State Depart- 
ment of Education. 

The Apprentice class of Local Union 109 of Sheffield, Alabama is also taking this 
coiirse in Parhamentary Procedure. So are several others in tlie state, including Tuscaloosa, 
Birmingham, Anniston and Montgomery. All of these classes are very enthusiastic about 
this type of training as it proves very interesting as well as helpful. 



LOCAL UNION No. 299 JOINS GOLDEN CIRCLE 

Last year Local Union No. 299, Union City, N. J. joined the golden circle of unions 
which have completed fifty years of service to their members. On the night of December 
10th the union marked its fiftieth anniversary with a dinner dance held at Columbian Hall 
in Jersey City. A large tiUTiout was on hand for the occasion and a grand time was enjoyed 
by one and all. 

Among the invited guests present with their wives were: General Representative 
Raleigh Rajoppi; J. J. Walsack, E. O'Horo, and A. R. Swanson, secretary and business 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



agents of Essex County; business agent H. Spotholz of Bergen County; business agent 
Wm. Bonnema of Passiac County; and business agents A. Beck and H. Cook of Hudson 
County. 

The three remaining charter members of Local Union No. 299— J. Truncillito, J. 
Guyer, and T. PugHs— were "singled out for special recognition and honors; they were 
presented with life membership cards. Presentation was made by General Representative 
Rajoppi. It was regrettable that charter member Puglis was unable to attend due to illness. 
However, the assemblage extended him every good wish for a complete and speedy 
recovery. 

Also honored on the occasion were the officers of the union. In consideration of their 
faithful devotion to duty, each was presented with an engraved fountain pen, and President 
Thomas Teetsel whose impartial and aggressive leadership has contributed much to the 
progress of the union was presented with a suitably engraved gold ring. Fine food, 
interesting entertainment and good fellowship combined to make the evening a great 
success. The committee responsible for the afiFair consisted of Frank McAndrews, chair- 
man, ably assisted by Brothers Bifano, Hitchler and Sands. 



PORTALES MEMBERS REBUILD WIDOW'S HOME 

Like the Bible, the ritual of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America admonishes its people to be charitable and considerate of their neighbors. That 
most members take this obligation seriously is being proven every day. From all over the 
nation come stories of good works being done by Brotherhood members. Not the least 
of these is the benevolent act of Local Union No. 2176 of Portales, N. M., which recent- 
ly imdertook to rebuild the fire-gutted house of a widow. 

On September 30th fire de- 
stroyed the home of Mrs. 
Bertha Gardner and her young 
daughter. The fire left them 
jf , ,^. ^^^ , destitute. Neighbors immedi- 

*.'^ <; t-^ ^- ...-'^..i^mKmi^ ately undertook a subscription 

campaign to help them in their 
hour of need. Hardly had the 
program gotten under way 
when representatives of Local 
Union No. 2176 appeared on 
the scene with an offer to do- 
nate the services of their mem- 
bership in rebuilding the home. 
The oflFer was gratefully ac- 
cepted, and on a Saturday 
morning a fine delegation of 
craftsmen from the union was on hand to get the task under way. Many hands made 
light work, and by 4:30 in the afternoon the house was ready for stucco. Neighbors 
served lunch at noon and coffee at intervals. Mrs. Gardner is now Hving in her new 
home and all the people of Portales are proud of the public spiritedness of Local Union 
No. 2176. 




PLEASANTVILLE SPONSORS A FINE SOCIAL EVENING 

For a nimiber of years. Local Union No. 842 of Pleasantville, New Jersey, has sponsored 
a get-together for its membership. Year in and year out these affairs have been a great 
success; and the latest of them, held late last year, was no exception. Members, wives 
and friends filled the banquet hall of the Fairmount Hotel, Cardiff, to near capacity for 
the occasion. The entertainment committee had done its work well. The food was excellent 
and a great program of local entertairmient kept things moving at a fast clip. 

Guests of honor were treasurer and Mrs. Gustav F. Koehler. Brother Koehler recently 
passed his fiftieth year as a member of the United Brotherhood. In consideration of his 
long and faithful service to the cause of organized labor, the tmion presented Brother 
Koehler with a fifty dollar purse. A suitable present was also given to Mrs. Koehler. The 
presentation was made by General Representative Raleigh Rajoppi who was present ias 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



a special guest. Other special guests present were representatives to the State Council 
and Mrs. Backlund of Local Union No. 620, Vineland, and several oificers of the Carpenters 
District Council of South Jersey. 

Local merchants, as a mark of their goodwill toward the tmion, donated a number 
of prizes which were given away during the evening. One and all had a grand time and 
all went home feeling it was good to break bread occasionally with one's neighbors and 
fellow workers. 



BOZEMAN LOCAL BOASTS OF GREAT OLD TIMER 

While there are many old timers in the United Brotherhood 
who have contributed much to the progress of organized labor down 
the years. Local Union No. 557 of Bozeman, Mont., is particularly 
proud of one of its members who falls in this category. He is Brother 
T. P. Taylor, who has been active in the Union for the past forty-five 
years. In good times and bad, through adversity and affluence, Brother 
Taylor has worked long and hard for the upbuilding of his Local 
Union. Although now reaching the ripe old age of eighty-two, Brother 
Taylor is still crusading for the cause of organized labor as actively as 
ever. During his time he has filled virtually every office in tlie Local 
and for the past fifteen years he has been capably serving as business 
agent. He is also second vice president of the Montana State Council. 
Building the Union has been as much a part of the life of Brother Tay- 
lor during the last fifty years as breathing. To a large extent the fine 

success achieved by Local Union No. 557 can be credited to his unselfish and untiring 

efforts. 




NIAGARA FALLS CELEBRATES 50th BIRTHDAY 

Local 322 of Niagara Falls celebrated its 50th Anniversary with a banquet in the State 
Armory on November 12, 1949. A turkey dinner was served and enjoyed by everyone. 

Ernest Curto,. who served as toastmaster, introduced Brother Theodore Hoak, President 
of Local 322, who in turn, led the Assembly in the Allegiance to our Flag. 

The Mayor of Niagara Falls, William Lupton, after his introduction, welcomed guests 
and also complimented the Local on its fine past record and wished it a successful future. 



S^ ^ 




Seated from left to rightiMrs. T. Hoak, Mr. and Mrs. J. O'Donnell, Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Curto, Sam Sutherland and Mr. and Mrs. Livingston. 

Standing from left to right: Cecil Moshier, Frank Knack, E. P. Hill, Robert Smart, Herb 
Jennings, Mayor W. Lupton, T. Hoak, M. F. Jordan, J. Moir, H. Jordan, M. Lynch, E. 
Fitzpatrick, F. Olson, H. Snyder, O. Noble and A. Lewis. 

Brother Sam Sutherland, General Representative, next on the program, gave a very 
interesting speech on the buying of American-made goods only. He also commented on 
the progress of tlie New York State Council of Carpenters. 

Harry Jordan, President of A. F. of L. Central Trades, gave a short talk on the progress 
of Niagara Falls Central Trades with the help of Local 322. 

First President of Local 322, Alexander Allen, was introduced by Toastmaster Curto. 



88 



THE CARPENTER 



Brother John O'Donnell, Representative of the General Office, was introduced last 
and complimented the Committee for a successful banquet. He gave a short speech on 
the operation of General Headquarters and the indi^"idual benefits received by members 
from the General Office. The entertainment was in the form of a floor show, followed by 
dancing, which continued until closing of tlie banquet. 

Local Business Agents present were as follows: Mr. Jack Costello, Plumbers and Steam- 
fitters; Mr. Charles Carrier, Laborers; Mr. Steven Lamb, Bricklayers; Mr. Richard Chase, 
Plasterers and Cement Finishers; Mr. Charles Harvey, Ironworkers; and Mr. Murphy, 
Painters. 



EL DORADO LOCAL DEDICATES FINE NEW HOME 

In the presence of a large number of members, friends, and special guests, Local 
Union No. 1693, El Dorado, Arkansas, on tlie night of November 21st officially dedicated 
its beautiful new home. The Mayor of the City was tliere to pay his respects as were 
most of the building materials dealers and contractors of tlie area. In fast, so many 
civic leaders were present that no doubt can possibly exist but that tlie entire community 

is proud of tlie accomplishments of Local 
Union No. 1683. 

The program was opened by President 
Ben M. Dumas who welcomed the special 
guests and out-of-town \"isitors who were 
on hand to help make tlie a_ffair the grand 
success it turned out to be. Among them 
were: Marvin Faulkner and M. A. Fisk of 
tlie Apprenticeship Training Service of 
the Department of Labor with head- 
quarters at Little Rock; S. V. Zinn, 
secretary-treasmrer of the Arkansas State 
Federation; W. D. \'\'elcher and C. C. 
Counts of Local Union No. 529, Camden, 
Ark; attorneys John ^L Shackelford and 
son, legal advisers to the union: the Rev. 
J. D. TolUson, pastor of the Immanuel 
Baptist Church, who gave tlie invocation; 
C. W. Mowery, president of tlie State Federation and state organizer for the American 
Federation of Labor and a member of tlie United Brotherhood for many, many years. 

A basket dinner prepared and sensed by the membership was thoroughly enjoyed by 
one and all. Featmred speaker of the evening was C. W. Mowery who dwelt at some 
length on tlie long and honorable career of tlie United Brotherhood and the fine record 
achieved by Local Union No. 1683. His remarks were very well-received. All who were 
present left tlie affair with a warm feUng of pride and good fellowsliip. 




CHICAGO MEMBER IL\S GREAT RECORD 

The members of Local 434, Chicago are justly proud of tlie record 
of Brother Joseph Belanger, Vice-President. He first joined Local 
No. 21, on Chicago's West Side, April 17, 1886, and on May 1st of 
that year a strike was called. One week later the famous Hajiiiarket 
riot occurred. All Labor Unions were immediately labeled anarchistic 
and Local No. 21 was forced "underground." However, it was soon 
reorganized under tlie same charter and stiU exists. 

In 1888, Brother Belanger, Living on Chicago's far Soutli Side, 
assisted in organizing Local No. 434, later clearing into that Local 
April 11, 1890. Brotlier Belanger was bom in Montreal, Canada, 
January 14, 1863. He moved to New York at the age of 17 years and 
shortly after changed his residence to Chicago. He has held several 
offices of No. 434 including president, secretary, trustee, and for the 
past many years, has been vice-president. 

He has missed a few meetings lately on account of illness, but enjoys visits from otlier 
members, and recalls nmnerous incidents of his nearly 64 years as a Union Carpenter. We 
wish him many more happy years to come. 





WATERLOO AUXILIARY CELEBRATE 10th BIRTHDAY 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 345 of Waterloo, Iowa, sends greetings to all sister Auxiliaries. 
On October 11, 1949, we celebrated our 10th anniversary. Many of the charter members 
were present and are still active. We had a lovely banquet with a charter member giving 
a svmimary of our 10 years as an organization. To us it will live in our memories always^ 




We now have 51 members in our organization and gaining new ones right along. We 
have our business meeting on the fourth Friday of every month. Our socials are the second 
Friday. We just had our semi-annual rummage sale which proved very successful. We try 
to keep busy with something each month throughout the year. 

We had our annual Christmas party December 10, at the Labor Temple with 150 in 
attendance. The ladies provided a lovely dinner followed by a children's program and 
square dancing. A good time .was had by all. We donate to many good causes throughout 
the year. 

We would like to hear from any sister Auxiliaries at any time. 

Fraternally, 

Irene Mixdorf, Recording Secretary. 



PINE BLUFF AUXILIARY OFF TO GOOD START 

The Editor: 

As our Auxiliary No. 551 of Pine Bluff, Ark., is a newly formed one, we wish to send 
greetings to all the Auxiliaries. 

We organized on August 9th of 1949 with 13 members. At this time we have grown 
to 27 members. We have been presented our charter of which we are very proud. 

We meet the first and third Monday of each montli at the Labor Temple, 

On December 19th, we had our Christmas party and banquet. For our guests, we had 
all union carpenters and tlieir families. Out-of-town guests and speakers were: S. V. Zinn, 
Secretary-Treasmrer Arkansas Federation of Labor; M. G. Rogers, past secretary of Local 
No. 690 of Little Rock; J. C. Barrett, international representative of Birmingham Ala., 
T. R. Simpson, President of Local 576, Pine Bluff; Mrs. M. G. Rogers, Recording Secretary, 
Little Rock, Auxiliary No. 255. 



40 THE CARPENTER 

We ladies of Aiixiliary 551 would welcome letters from any of our sister Auxiliaries. 
Any wives, daughters or sisters of union carpenters who would like to join us may come to 
the meetings or contact our officers who are: Mrs. Irene Morgan, President; Mrs. Alma 
Slocum, Vice President; Mrs. G. T. Anderson, Recording Secretary; Mrs. T. R. Simpson, 
Financial Secretary and Treasurer; Mrs. Pearl Morgan, Mrs. John Verdue, and Miss Reba 
Joe Hughes, Trustees; Conductor, Mrs. Paul Earles; Warden, Mrs. Ed. Ezell, Publicity 
Chairman, Mrs. Corine Cannon. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. C. T. Anderson, Recording Secretary. 



TULSA LADIES HOLD SUCCESSFUL MEMBERSHIP DRWE 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all sister AuxiUaries from Auxiliary No. 331 of Tulsa, Oklahoma. We 
organized in 1939 and have 96 members and 18 charter members. 

We meet each Tuesday night with the exception of the first Tuesday when we have 
our birthday luncheon. Otir social club meets the third Friday of each montli, and recently 
we had a chih supper and carnival which brought in enough money to buy a radio- 
phonograph combination for our entertainment. 

By having a nmimage sale we made $42.72 and a treasure chest netted us $115.00. 
Our ladies have pieced a quilt which will be sold soon to add to our treasury. 

The state convention was held here on September 12, 13 and 14, at which time we 
had a lovely dinner at the Alvin Hotel. 

We have just finished a membership drive and have 24 new members. 

Our officers are: Mrs. Elizabeth Turner, President; Mrs. Alice Gibson, Vice-President; 
Mrs. Rutli Dawes, Recording Secretary; Mrs. Mable Goodwin, Financial Secretary; Mrs. 
Thresa Smith, Conductor; Mrs. Mary Ferguson, Warden; Mrs. Joyce Taylor, Mrs. Evelyn 
Barnett and Mrs. Edna Philhps, Trustees. 

The state con\'ention will be held in Oklahoma City this September. 

We would love to hear from tlie otlier Auxiliaries at any time. 

Fraternally, 

Ruth Dawes, Recording Secretary. 



TEXAS CITY LADIES FORM AUXILIARY 

The Editor: 

^ 

This letter is to inform you of our newly organized Ladies' Auxiliary No. 558, Texas 
City, Texas. We were presented our charter on December 5, 1949, at 7:30 p.m., by 
ladies from Houston and Galveston Auxiharies. We are very proud to be a part in serv- 
ing our carpenter men. We organized with 28 members. 

The following is a fist of our officers: Mrs. G. L. Strong, President; Mrs. E. R. Hard- 
man, Vice-President; Mrs. C. E. Hughes, Recording Secretary; Mrs. R. L. Scott, Financial 
Secretary and Treasurer; Mrs. C. L. Crawford, Conductress; Mrs. J. D. White, Warden; 
Mrs. H. E. Woodhouse, Mrs. P. L. Bottoms and Mrs. L. L. Landriault, Trustees. 

Mrs. C. E. Hughes. 
• 

LOCAL 811 SPONSORS XMAS PARTY 

The Editor: 

On Thursday evening December 8, 1949 Local Union No. 811, New Bethlehem, Pa. 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners entertained its members in the Social Room 
of the First National Bank. 

At 6:30 a fine turkey dinner was served by Mrs. Ruth McMillen and her efficient 
helpers, which was enjoyed by all. 

During tiie dinner Christmas music was played through the courtesy of Shumaker's 
Music Store, New Bethlehem, Pa. 

After the dinner two and one-half hoinrs of fine motion pictures were shown by Mr. 
Blain George, Hawthorne Pa. 

A very dehghtful e\ening was enjoyed by all members present. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 257 

Irregular Pitch Roof Framing.— Irregular 
pitch roof framing is no more difBcult than 
regular pitch roof framing. It is true that 




Fig. 1 
the roof framer must be on his guard, so as 
not to become confused, but the principle 
is the same. That is also true of irregular 




Fig. 2 
plan roof framing. The reason many work- 
men find these two branches of roof framing 
difficult, is that they do not fully understand 
the principle of regular hip roof framing. 



The rule, that the run and the length of the 
rafter will give the edge bevel for hips, val- 
leys, and jacks, increases the confusion. 
While this old rule is easy to remember and 
will work in regular roof framing, it is an 
incorrect rule. The correct rule is this: The 
tangent and the rafter length will give the 
edge bevel for hips, valleys, and jacks— the 
rafter length giving the bevel. This rule 
covers regular hip roofs, as well as irregular 
hip roofs, both in plan and in pitch. By 




Fig. 3 
using the word, tangent, instead of the 
word, run, the rule becomes applicable to all 
hip roofs. When the use of tlie tangent is 
thoroughly understood, tlie roof framer vidll 
have no more difficulty in framing the irreg- 
ular hip and valley roofs than he has in 
framing tlie regular hip roofs. It is suggest- 
ed, however, that diagrams be made for ir- 
regular hip and valley roofs, on tlie order 
of the diagrams shown in these lessons. 

The Run of Irregular Hip Rafters.— Fig. 
1 gives a plan of an irregular hip roof, 28 
feet by 40 feet, -with a deck 4 feet square. 
The run of the sides is 12 feet, while the 
run of the ends is 18 feet. This is shown 
by the shaded square, which is in position 
for obtaining tlie hip run. The tongue holds 
the short run, 12 feet, while the blade holds 
the long run, 18 feet. The diagonal distance 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



between 18 and 12 on the square, is the 
hip run, as shown on the diagram. (In regu- 
lar hip roof framing it is the diagonal dis- 




Fig. 4 



tance between 12 and 12, because the runs 
are the same.) 

It should be remembered that in all of 
these diagrams, inches on the square repre- 
sent feet in tlie diagram. In this connection, 
the suggestion is repeated, that the roof 
framer make a diagram of tlie roof in hand, 
using a convenient scale, say, 1 inch equals 
1 foot. Then by applying tlie square to the 
diagram, as shown in tliese lessons, he can 
get the various bevels and cuts of tlie rafters 
that he is framing. 




Edge Bevels of Hips.— Fig. 2 shows the 
blade of the square apphed to the run of 
one hip. The lines, c-d, d-a, and a-c, respec- 
tively, represent the run, tlie rise, and the 
hip rafter. This triangle, pi\ oted on the run, 
is shown as if it were lying on die side. 
The rise is 12 feet. The shaded bevel at a, 
gives the plumb cut of the hip rafter. With 
the compass set at c, transfer point a to b, 
as shown by the dotted part-circle. This 
brings the rafter length, c-a, in Une with the 
hip run, c-d, and on to b. Now tlie edge 
bevel that wiU fit the ends of the deck is 
obtained by taking the tangent and the raf- 
ter length on the square— the rafter length 
giving the bevel. It is obvious that the 



square is not large enough to hold the tan- 
gent on one ami and the rafter length on 
the other, so the two distances should be 
divided by 2, which will give a reduced 
tangent and a reduced rafter length. With 
tliese reduced points taken in the most con- 
venient way on the square, the edge bevel 
can be marked— the arm on which the re- 
duced rafter length is taken gives the bevel. 

Fig. 3 shows in part, the roof plan shown 
in Fig. 2 and the diagram for obtaining the 
points to use for marking the edge bevel 
of the hip rafters to fit the ends of the deck. 
In this case the tongue of the square is ap- 
pUed to the tangent line. To get the edge 
bevel, use 12 on the tongue of the square 
and the point where the diagonal Une crosses 




Fig. 6 



the edge of the blade, or point X. The blade 
gives the bevel. 

Fig. 4 shows tlie blade of the square ap- 
plied to the run of one hip, to obtain the 
points on the square for marking the bevel 
that vdll fit the side of tlie deck. The tri- 
angle, a-c-d, is the same as in the previous 
diagram. The rafter lengtli is transferred 




with a compass from c-a to c-b, as indicated 
by the dotted part-circle. The tangent and 
the rafter taken on the square will give the 
edge bevel— mark on the arm that holds the 



THE CARPENTER 



43 



rafter length. Again, the tangent and the 
rafter should be reduced by dividing both 
by 2. 

Fig. 5 shows the diagram shown in Fig. 4, 
but here the square is applied on the tangent 
line, as shown. To mark the bevel, take 12 
on the tongue of the square and point X on 
the blade— the blade giving the bevel. The 
principle here is the same as in Fig. 3. 

Fig. 6 shows the square applied to the 
timber for marking the two bevels necessary 
to make the rafter straddle the corner of the 
deck. The shaded square is applied, using 
12 and point X. Point X was found by ap- 
plying the square as shown in Fig. 3. The 
dotted-line square is also applied by using 
12 and point X, but as shown by the appli- 




Fig. 8 

cation of the square in Fig 5. Compare and 
study the two applications of the square in 
Fig. 6, with the applications of the square 
shown in Figs. 3 and 5. 

Edge Bevels for Jacks.— Fig 7 shows the 
square applied to get tlie points for marking 
the edge bevel of jacks for the ends of the 
roof. Here the lines, c-d, d-a, and a-c, show 
respectively, the run, the rise, and the length 
of the rafter as if the rafter were on its side. 
The rafter length, c-a, is transferred to the 
run line, c-X, with the compass, as shown 
by the dotted part-circle. Now the tangent 




|-*— "Janqeyit -^ 
Fig. 9 

and the rafter length will give the edge 
bevel-the rafter length giving the bevel. In 
other words, 12 on the tongue and point X 
on the blade will give the edge bevel— the 
blade giving the bevel. Fig. 8 shows the 



square applied to the rafter timber-mark 
along the blade. 

Fig. 9 shows the square applied to get the 
points for marking the edge bevel of the 
jacks for the sides of the roof. The tangent 
and the rafter length will give the edge 
bevel— the rafter length giving the bevel. 
Again, the square is too small to hold the 




Fig. 10 

tangent and the rafter length, so the two 
distances should be reduced as explained be- 
fore, and taken in the most convenient way 
on the square. Fig. 10 shows the square 
applied to the rafter material, using 18 and 
point X. Mark along the tongue. 



WANTS TO KNOW 

By H. H. Siegele 

A reader wants to know how to obtain 
the edge bevel for a hip of an irregular 
plan roof. 

If the student will fix in mind the "tan- 
gent" as it is used in roof framing, so that 
he will know exactly what it is used for, 
he \n\l have no more trouble in framing 
an irregular hip roof than he has in framing 
a regular hip roof. This applies to both 
irregular plan and irregular pitch hip roofs. 

Fig. 1 shows a diagram of one end of an 
irregular plan hip roof. The blade of the 
square is on the seat of the hip rafter for 
the dull angle of the plan. To obtain the 



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44 



THE CARPENTER 



length of the hip rafter, make the rise, E-A, 
eqiial to the rise of the common rafter, and 
draw in the hip rafter as sho^\•n from A to 
C. With the compass set at C, transfer the 
rafter length, C-A, to C-B, as indicated by 
the dotted part-circle, A-B. Extend the 
seat hne of the hip, C-E, to B, as sho%%Ti 
bv dotted Hne. Also extend the seat hne 
of the common rafter to D, as .the dotted 
line indicates. To mark the edse bevel, take 
the rafter length. C-B. on tlie blade of the 



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square, and the tangent on the tongue. I£ 
the hip rafter is to join the two last com- 
mon rafters, shown to the left and right of 
the hip, then the blade will give the bevel. 




But if the hip is to saddle on to a ridge 
board (or a deck) then tlie tongue wrill give 
the bevel. 

Fig. 2 shows how to get the points for 
marking the edge bevel of the jacks that 




*Jan^ehh\ 



Fig. 2 

join the hip just explained. With the com- 
pass set at C, transfer the rafter length, 
C-A, to C-B. Now take the rafter length 
(Rafter L.) on the blade of the square, and 
the tangent on the tongue. The blade will 
give the bevel. 



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1115 So. Pearl St., C-38, Denver 10, Colo. 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reierre the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be. In their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space In "The Car- 
penter," Including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellahle, are only accepted srbject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

The American Floor Surfacing 

Machine Co., Toledo, Ohio 1 

Ardee Tool Co., Rocky River 

Sta., Ohio 44 

Arrow Fastener Co., Inc., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 44 

Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, 

Calif. :__ 45 

Cummins Portable Tools, Chicago, 



111. 



4 
45 
48 
48 
47 
48 
47 
24-25 



Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

The Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 
Mich. 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 
Mass. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Packard Mfg. Corp., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

J. H. Scharf Mfg. Co., Omaha, 

Nebr. 46 

Sharps Mfg. Co., Salem, Ore 47 

Skilsaw, Inc, Chicago, 111 6 

Speedcor Products, Portland, 

Ore. 45 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn._3rd Cover 

Welliver & Sons, Rockford, 111.— 45 

Carpentry Materials 

The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._2nd Cover ' 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City, Ind 4th Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi 
cago. 111. 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Builders Topics, Seattle, Wash._ 48 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 
Corp., New York, N. Y 

Tamblyn System. Denver, Colo._ 



47 



3 
43 



5 
46 



Wearing Apparel 
The H. D. Lee Co., Inc., Kansas 
City, Mo. -■ 



1 

\ 
■ ■\ 

- .J 
3rd Coveri 



KEEP THE MONEY 
IN THE FAMILY! 

PATRONIZE 
ADVERTISERS 



PILOT HOLES in a 

hurry with one hand ^ 

and a"YANKEE" I 

Automatic Push Drill 4 



Give yourself an extra hand for 
holding doors, window stop mould- 
ing, hardware and other work. A 
"Yankee" Push Drill bores holes 
fast, easy, one-handed. Spring in 
handle brings it back after every 
stroke and puts a reverse spin in 
the drill point to clear away chips. 
Improved chuck prevents drills 
pulling out. Magazine handle holds 
8 drill points, ^" to |i". Built for 
years of willing work. Your Stanley 
dealer carries these and other 
"Yankee" Tools. 

Write for "Yankee" Tool Book 



•YANKEE" TOOLS 
NOW PART OP 



[STANLEY] 



THE TOOL BOX 
OF THE WORLD 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Philadelphia 33, Pa. 



"Yankee' 
No. 41 




ILUFKIN X-46 FOLDING EXTENSION RULE 
IS EXTRA RIGID-DURABLE-ACCURATE! 

i4o. X-46 is the superior extension rule— ideal for 
|i>oth inside measuring of openings and general 

•urpose measuring. % inch wide sections ore of 

tralght grained hardwood in boxwood finish. Other 

aatures are: 

|>t Sections 14 inch thick. . .33% itronger. 
i'> Prominent black markings— easy to read. 

'' Patented Brats Plated spring lock ioints. 
Broit ttrilce plates prevent wear. 
6-ln. graduated slide in one end. 

»o it — Buy if . . . al your nearest Hardwara DeaUr, 



IE LUFKIN RULE GO. 
IGINAW, MICHIGAN • 



• TAPES • RULES 
NEW YORK CITY 



PRECISION TOOLS 
BARRIE, ONTARIO 



12th Edition for 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 



Learn to draw plana, estimate, be a Ilve-wlre builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 9 practical, pro- 
fusely illustrated books cover subjects that will help you 
to get more work and make more money. Masonry, con- 
crete forms, carpentry, steel square, roof framing, construc- 
tion, plumbing, heating, painting, decorating and many 
other subjects. More than 4000 pages — 2750 Illustrations. 



BETTER JOBS -BETTER PAY ^^p^i^f^^'iJ 

These books are 



A nationwide building boom la In full 
swing and trained men are needed. 
Big opportunities are always for MEN the most up-to- 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- date and complete 
ply quick, easily understood training and we have ever pub- 
handy, permanent reference Information lished on theia 
that helps solve building problems. many subjects. 
Coupon Brings Nine Big Books For Examination 

AMERICAN TECHNicAT society" Publishers since" 1898 

Dept. G-236 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 
You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your nine 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery chargei 
only, and if fully satisfied in ten days, I will send you 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 Is paid. I am not obligated In any 
way unless I keep the books. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one buslnesi 
man as reference. Men In service, also give home address. 



NOW! Roof 
Framing is Easy 

with SHARP'S ^.-^-^ 
Automatic / 



'ENLARGED 

SECTION 
Rafter Tobls 



Q 



ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW IS WIDTH 
OF BUILDING AND PITCH OF ROOF 

Just set tool to pitch of roof and it 
automatically solves every problem and 
provides direct marking guide for all 
cuts. Gives exact figures for length of 
rafters. Cuts given in square reading* 
and in degrees for power saw worlc. 
Opens to 90-deg. angle. Guaranteed. 



SHARP'S 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 

p. 0. Box 122 
Sal'jm, Oregon 



^,;^^,tfui^^TR^mHQ square 



Now Only 

$7.85 

Prepaid 



The WORLD'S FAVORITE 
Automatic Drill 



For boring small holes, there's nothing quite like this 
famous Millers Falls No. 185A - formerly "Mr. 
Punch." Sturdy . . . smooth-acting . . . long- 
lived— it's one of the most phenomenally 
successful hand tools ever designed. 
Complete with 8 new style 
drill points from 1/16" to 
ll/64"in quick-selec- 
tion, magazine 
handle. 



Ask your hardware 
dealer for one today. 



MILLERS FALLS 
TOOLS 



MILLERS FALLS COMPANY 

GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



:^^^i 




^ HANG THAT DOOR 
THE PROFESSIONAL WAY! 



Makes a clean-cut, deeply-etched profile on door. 
Hemove chips. Repeat operation on jamb. Hang 
door! No adjustments. No fussing. Precision made. 

-forged, heat-treated steel. Comes in 3", 3i" 

4" (Std) sizes. 

ONLY $1.75 ea. — $3.50 a pair 
(any two) — $5.25 complete set 
of three. If dealer can't supply, 
send only $1.00 with order and 
pay postman balance plus post- 
age C. O. D. In Canada. .25c 
higher per order. No C. O. D. 
State sizes wanted. 



USERS PRAISE 
HieHLY 

"Really • help for the 
'old hands' and almoit 
a 'must' for the new 
boys." 

S. H. Glover 
Cincinnati. Ohio 

"The greatest help in 
hanging doors I bsTe 
ever seen." 

J. Allen Charles 
Mullins, S. C. 



Comes With 
Leatherette case 




E-Z MARK TOOLS. Box 8377 Dept. C, Los Angeles 16. Cil. 



TOU DO THIS 




MACHINE SAW FILING 

PAYS UP TO S2 or $3 an ^""^ 

hour. With a Foley Saw Filer you can file 
all hand sawf5, also band and cross-cut cir- 
cular saws. It is easy to operate — simple 
adjustments — no eyestrain. Start AT HOME 
in basement or garage. Patented jointing 
principle evens up all irregular teeth and 
makes an old saw cut just like new. 

Send for FREE BOOK 

"Independence After 40" 

No canvassing necessary — "I ad- 
vertised in our local paper and 
got in 93 saws — I only work spare 
time at present" says M. 
C. Thompson. Leo H. 
Mix, writes: "I made 
about $900 i n spare 
time last year." Free 
Book shows how you can 
start in spare time at 
home with small invest- 
ment. Send coupon today 
-no salesman will call. 




•Trule Mark 
Her. U. S, 
P»t. Of/. 



FOIEY^^^^SAW FILER m 



FOLEY MFG. CO.. 218-0 Foley BIdg.. 

Minneapolis 18, Minn. 

Send FREE BOOK— "Independence After 40" 

yame 

Addremt 



HOW TO CUT RAFTERS 



It's new . . . NOW 

New vest pocket books gives lengths, side cuts, plumb | 
cuts, deductions, for all rafters any building from one 
inch to forty feet wide. Gives numbers to cut on 
square. All standard pitches from li" to 12 up to ITJ j 
and 12 rise. Any one can frame a roof with this great i 
book. Just open book to your pitch page and there in I 
plain print is your lengths cuts and deductions for any 
pitched roof. Also gives how to figure elevations. How 
to figure lumber. How to lay out window and door 
openings. Written by Harry (Dad) Bleam and it's a | 
dandy. Price only $2.00 each. 

STRINGER LAYOUTS. ™| ^h^\ 

Its a simplified stair builders manual; Its a lay out book 
for carpenters that want a simple way to lay out stair car- 
riages and stringers. ,Tust plain talk with illustrations that 
a worker can understand. Xo trigonometry, obtuse angles or 
other high fluting talk. Not written for a stair builder, but 
rather for the man who has little time to throw up a stair 
carriage and trot along with his other work, simple, con- 
cise, and practical. THE BEST FOR THE MOXET. 72 
pages, size 4% x 6% inches. Its a dandy says everyone that 
has it. Price $2.00. This is another of "Dad Bleam's 
Books." 

CARPENTRY ESTIMATING 
If you are an apprentice estimator you will want this man- 
ual on carpentry estimating by "Dad Bleam." Is just the 
McCoy for the person starting out to do estimating work. 
Gives costs in carpenter hours. Gives simple and easy tc 
understand carpentry mathematics. Plenty of charts and s 
E5vell value, you will like this one if you want to leani. 
Price $2.00 

STEP BY STEP HOUSE FRAMING DETAILS 

Step by step house framing details is another of th-; 
"Dad Bleam manuals." It's crammed full of house fram- 
ing illustrations, from the laying out of the foundation tc 
top of roof. Price $2.00 

Write 



BUILDERS' TOPICS 

1512 Market St. Seattle 7, W«»h 

NOTICE— ALL THE ABOVE FOUR MANUALS WILL 
BE SENT TO ANY ADDRESS AT SPECIAL PRICE OF 
$4.00 YOU SAVE $4.00. 



STANLEY LEVELS 

Wf \i^ mk iMm ImI l^ 

Mtade accurate to stay accurate, Stanley Levels have all the fea- 
:ures that carpenters want . . . for long, dependable service. Look 
)ver the complete line of Stanley Levels and other fine tools at 
rour local hardware dealer's. Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn. 



No. 233 LIGHTWEIGHT ALUMINUM LEVEL. Warp and rustproof. 
Truss construction. Six glasses, fully adjustable to 30°, 45° or 
degree of pitch to the foot. Precision milled top, bottom and 
sides. 24 and 28 inch sizes. 



/ 



X 



mt TOOl BOX OF THE WORL D 

[STANLEY] 

Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. 



No. 257 SEASONED PINE LEVEL. Lightweight, weather- 
proofed. Four proved "Cat's Eye" glasses — two single 
plumbs, one double level. Handy grip and hang hole. 
24 and 28 inch sizes. 



HARDWARE • TOOLS • ELECTRIC TOOLS • STEEL STRAPPING • STEEL 



UNION MADE 

f £k£^ Carpenter's 
'^^^Overalh 



LEE 

TAILORED SIZES 

LEE STURDY 
' FABRIC . . 

SANFORIZED 

Guaranteed I 
Satisfaction 
• • . or your 
money back! 

World's Largesf 
maker of Union- 
Mad • work 
clothes. 

rfteH.D.LEECO. 



I Kansas City, Mo. 
Tranten. N. J. 
South Bend. Ind. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
San Franeiseo, Calif 
Salina, Kant. 




AUDELS Carpenters 
and Buiidei'S Guides 

4vois.$6 

Inside Trade Inf ermatien 

for Carpenters, Bnildere, Jois* 
era, Boilding Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Guide* 
ffive yoa the short-cat iDtitruc- 
tions that yoa want— incladin^ 
Dew methods, ideas, solations. 

f>lans. systems and money eav- 
DK soggestions. An easy pro- 
grressive course for the appren- 
tice and atadent. A practical 
dally helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpenters everywhere are Q»» 
ins these Guides as a Belpins 
Hand to Easier Work, Better 
Work and Better Pay. To Bet 
this assistance (or yoorsau. 
_. simply fill in and . . 

Inside Trade Information On: mailFEEE coupon i)ekrw. 

How to use the steel square — How to file and 

set saws — How to build furniture — How to use 

a mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How 

to use rules and scales — How to make joints — 

Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength ol timbers — 

How to set girders and sills — How to frame 

houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — How 

to build houses, bams, garages, bvmgalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

specifications — How to excavate — How to use 

settings 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to build hoists and scaffolds — skylights — How 

to build stairs — How to put on interior trim — . 

How to hang doors — How to lath — lay floors — How to paint. 

■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■BM«BBMBKH»H«Ba«B^«»»»B««»^» ■■■■■■■■■■■ 

AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St., New Yoi* 10, N. Y. 

Mail Audeis Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 7 davs' fre* 
trial, if OK I will remit $1 in 7 days and $1 monthly until $6 is.pakl. 
—Otherwise I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfMd. 





Name- 



Occupation- 



CAE 





MIRACLE WEDGE 



Structures housing equipment and goods of large quantity or heavy weight must be 
built from best materials throughout in order to have a long and useful life. The door 
which has proved eminently satisfactory in such structures is The "OVERHEAD DOOR' 
with the Miracle Wedge. This door combines great strength with light weight and un- 
paralleled ease of operation. It is equipped with durable hardware, is always ready 
for instant opening, and it provides a weathertight closure. That is why so many build- 
ers specify it for every structure. The 'OVERHEAD DOOR" is built for industrial, comm- 
ercial, residential and rural use, and may be manually or electrically operated. 



TRACKS AND HARDWARE OF SALT SPRAY STEEL 



I 



OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION • Hartford City, Indiana, U.S.A. 



MANUFACTURING DIVISIONS 



ClENOAlE. CAUFOtNIA 
OPtlAMOMA CITY. OKLAHOMA 



OETtOir, MICHIGAN 
fOITlANO, OIECON 



HIUSIDE. NEW JEtSEY 
lEWISTOWN, FENNSYIVANIA 



COtTLANO. NEW YOtK 
CALIAS, TEXAS 




FOUNDED 1881 

OfRcial Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 

MARCH, 1950 




SAMUEL GGMPERS 

CENTENNIAL 
1S5D — 1950 



CRACKED PLASTER- 

an opportunity for carpenters! 



It can truly be said that the car- 
penter who makes a business of re- 
covering cracked ceilings is never out 
of a job! 

For cracked, unsightly and unsafe 
ceilings are everywhere! 

Independent surveys show that 
tux) out of every three homes have one 
or more rooms with cracked ceilings 
in need of repair. 

Think what this means to you! 

You, as a carpenter, have the skiU 
— and you can get the material — to 
supply the only satisfactory answer 
to ^ cracked ceiling problem. 

Patching and makeshift plaster 
repairs never are satisfactory — never 
last. 




i?e-covering cracked ceilings is 
rigEtfuUy your job. It can be yours 
if you will only step up and ask for it. 

You can save the housewife from 
the ordeal of re-plastering. You can 
save her from the seeping, floating, 
gritty white dust that causes need- 
less housecleaning drudgery! 



For you — and only you as a car- 
penter — can apply an Upson Ceiling 
right over old plaster. Using Upsor 
Kuver-Krak Panels and Upson Float- 
ing Fasteners, you can biiild a beau- 



tiful ceiling, that wiLL remain foreye 
crackproof. A ceiling that wiU brin! 
praise from your customer. A ceUini 
that you will be proud of yourseli 

And you wiU enjoy working oi 
the job too. Upson Kuyer-Kra] 
Panels are clean, light in weight, easj 
to handle, easy to apply. Nearly aJ 
lumber dealers carry them in stoct 
Mouldings, furring strips, Upsoi 
No. 2 Floating Fasteners and nail 
are all you need. 

Send the coupon now for simpl 
Instruction Sheet. Get started no^ 
on these pleasant, profitable all-the 
year jobs. 

For the best possible job — insif 
on 5-ply Kuver-Krak Panels— -s 
identified on every panel. 




THE UPSON COMPANY 433 Upson Pomt, Uekport, New York 

Send me Instruction Sheet and information for applying 5 ply Upson Kuver-Krak Panels 
for Upson Ceilings. 

NAME 



STREET. 
CITY 



STATE 




"Following 

the line 

is easier 

with 

SKIL Saw" 

You can 

always see 

both the 

blade 

and the 

mark 



SKIL Saw lets you see what you're doing ... on every cut. 
There's no need to look around motor housings. There's no leaning over the 
saw to see what's going on. Your line of cut is always in plain view. You see 
the SKIL Saw blade as it cuts. You work in a normal, easy position. 

Full visibility, perfect balance and extra power make SKIL 
Saw easier to use on any job. Tough, heavy-duty construction keeps SKIL Saw 
out of the shop, keeps SKIL Saw on the job. Ask your SKIL Tools Distributor 

for a demonstration of easy-handling, hard- 
working SKIL Saws today. 




SKIL Saws— for 25 
years the leading portable electric 
saw. Choose from 9 modeb wJth 
Wade sizes from <S to 12 inches. 




SKIL Products ore mode only by 

SKILSAW, INC. 

5033 Eltton Ave., Chicoflo 30, III. 

Factory Branches in Principal Cities 

In Canada: SKILTOOLS. LTD.. 66 Portland St., Toronto. Ont. 





Trm^^^TCR 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXX— No. 3 



INDIANAPOLIS, MARCH, 1950 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



The No. 1 Problem - - - - - - 7 

With the possible exception of national security, no one thing is creating more inter- 
est among the people of the United States than is Social Security. The demand for a 
realistic Social Security program is tremendous. The House has already passed H.R. 6000 
which expands and liberalizes the existing Social Security program. This article makes 
a comparison of the existing program and the changes proposed by H.R. 6000. 



The Ramparts We Watch 



10 

An Indianapolis paper not known for Its pro-labor bias raises the question, what 
makes a communist? The paper admits that the economic squeeze turns many loyal 
citizens into communists because they can see no way out for themselves. Yet whenever 
some of these unfortunates join a union and go on strike to elevate themselves the 
paper is almost always against them. Why? 



The Place to Start 



16 



A rotten borough system in many states has long kept the state legislature in the 
control of rural elements because through outmoded apportionment systems rural citi- 
zens get from five to twenty times as much representation. The time for a change is long 
overdue. 



Gompers the Peerless 



21 

When the history of this age is written, few people will have a more prominent 
role than Samuel Gompers, the product of a London slum, >vhose long and tireless efforts 
in behalf of working people made him a world figure. His philosophy, wrhich ^as based 
almost entirely on freedom for all, still guides the destinies of millions of workers 
throughout the world. 



• • • 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

The Locker 

Editorials 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems 



14 
19 
24 
28 
29 
31 
34 
36 



Index to Advertisers 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917. authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 



Get the practical training you need 

msss^^^l^^for PROMOTION, 

INCREASED INCOME 




Prepare now for more pay, greater success. 
Hundreds have quickly advanced to foreman, 
superintendent, inspector, estimator, contrac- 
tor, with this Chicago Tech training in Build- 
ing. Your practical experience aids your suc- 
cess. 

Learn how to lay out and run building jobs, read 
blue prints, estimate building costs, superintend con- 
struction. Practical training -with complete blue print 
plans and specifications — same as used by superin« 
tendents and contractors. Over 46 years of experi- 
ence in training practical builders. 



FREE 



Blue Prints 
and Trial Lesson 



FHOROUGH TRAINING IN BUILDING 

.earn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you 
hat the way to the top-pay jobs and 
uccess in Building is to get thorough 
knowledge of blue prints, building con- 
truction and estimating. 

n this Chicago Tech Course, you learn to 

ead blue prints — the universal language of 

he builder — and understand specifications — 

or all types of buildings. 

Tou learn building construction details : 

oundations, vralls, roofs, windows and doors, 

rches, stairs, etc. 

'ou learn how to lay out work and direct 

'uilding jobs from start to finish 

estimate building costs quick- 

7 and accurately. Find out 

''.ow you can prepare at home 

or the higher-paid jobs in 

building, or your own success- 

ul contracting business. Get the 

acts about this income-boosting 

-"■hieago Tech training now. 



Send today for Trial Lesson: "How to Read 
Blue Prints," and set of Blue Print Plans — 
sent to you Free. See for yourself how this 
Chicago Tech course prepares you to earn 
more money, gives you the thorough knowl- 
edge of Building required for the higher-up 
jobs and higher pay. Don't delay. Mail the 
coupon today in an envelope or use penny 
postcard. 



MAIL COUPON NOW 



r 



Chicago Technical College 

C-122 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 16, 111. 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet : 
"How to Read Blue Prints" with information 
about how I can train at home. 



You learn 




CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



BUILD PRESTIGE . . . SATISFY 

CUSTOMERS This Easy, Economical War 



BILL, YOU'LLBE GLAD I SPECIFIED tJiCHOLS 
NEVEP-STAIN ALUMINUM NAILS FOR YOUR 
HOME. THEV won't RUST LIKE ORDINARY 
NAILS. THEY WON'T STREAK OR STAIN 
PAINTED SIDING OR CAUSE SIDING TO 
LOOSEN THR0U6K NAIL RUST. YETTHEY 
COST LESS THAN ^3.B0 MORETHAN ORD" 
lARY NAILS FOR /OUR FIVE-ROOM HOUSE 



ONE YEAR 
LATER 



WA \^ 10 PERSONALLY 

THANK YOU FOR USING ALUMINUM 
NAILS ON MY HOME. ONE OF h\V 
NEIGHBORS HAP TO REPAINTHIS HOME 
'u!\ST WEEK BECAU5E0F RUSTED SI DI,M6. 
COST HIM ^300. MY PLACE LOOKS 
GOOD AS NEW- THANKS TO YOU AMD 
NEVER-STAiN ALUM i N UM NAILS! 



4^e4/ THERE'S A BIG 
DIFFERENCE IN NAILS! 

Nichols Never-S+ain Aluminum 
Nails are etched from head +o 
tip for greater holding power 
, . . drive easily . . . lighter to 
carry . . . and cost less to 
apply because no countersink- 
ing or put+ying is necessary! 
Billions have been used. 



m^i._ ^ 



WIDE VARIETY OF 
TYPES AND SIZES 



■^^»^ 



NOW PACKAGED FOR THE JOB! 

• Aluminum Roofing Nails • Wood Siding Nails — Casing or Sinker Head 

• Asbestos Siding Nails • Rock Lath Nails • Shingle Nails • Asbestos Shingle 
Nails • Cedar Shake Nails • Driwall-Board Nails • Roofing Nails with or 

- — without Gora-Lee neoprene washers 



NICHOLS WIRE & ALUMINUM CO. 

General OfRee and Plant — Davenport, Iowa 
Branches — Mason City, Iowa • BaHle Creek, Mich. 
South Deerfieid, Mass. • Oakland, Cal. • Seattle, Wash. 



U M I N U M IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE! 





with New AMERICAN 8y2^^SAW 

Here's the sweetest handling Saw you've ever used — the sensa^ 
tional new American! See it — try it — compare! Big capacity — 
^y-i^ blade. Big power G.E. motor develops 2^/8 H.P. Top 
speed cutting, any position . . . for wood, stone, tile, sheet metal, 
compositions. No jolt — no twist when starting — balanced torque 
principle. Saves time, saves labor, cuts costs! Send coupon for 
details and FREE demonstration. 




No Jolt — No Twist when starting 
BALANCED TORQUE PRINCIPLE 



SINCE 1903 



AMERICAN 
PORTABLE TOOLS 



The American Floor Surfacing Machine Co. 
520 So. St. Cloir St., Toledo 3, Ohio 

□ Please send me illustrated bulletin and price on 
new American Power Saw. No obligation. 

□ Please arrange a FREE demonstration of the 
new American Power Saw. No obligation. 



City_ 



.State 



with this Cummins 

POWER TOOL COIVIBINATION 



If you were to buy all the power tools, with independent 
motor drives, that you'd need to do all the jobs 
illustrated here, it would cost you in excess of $350.00. 
For only $176.00 you can buy this new and amazing 
Cummins Combination of power tools, consisting of 
Cummins Model 600 Portable Saw the power unit, 
Cummins Model 630 4" Belt Sander and Cummins 
Model 640 Planer. In your shop or on the job site 
these tools will save you money . . . they will do 
all these jobs faster, better, easier. Write today for 
complete details. You will be glad you did. 






DOOR PLANING 



BEVEL PLANING 



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CUMMINS MODEL 600 SAW 
THE POWER UNIT 

Cuts 1%" deep in wood. Base adjusts 
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Name 



CUMMINS MODEL 630 
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_ Address 



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I Occupation. 



City. 



.Zone State 



CUMMINS PORTABLE TOOLS 

DIVISION OF CUMMINS BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION 

4740 NORTH RAVENSWOOO AVENUE • CHICAGO 40, ILLINOIS 

Over 60 ^ears of Precision Manufacture 



THE No. 1 WORRY 

• * * 

WITH THE possible exception of national security, there is no subject 
in which the working people of the nation are more interested 
today than in Social Security. The present Social Security Law went 
into effect in 1937. At that time most working people agreed that the law was 
good but somewhat inadequate. Since that time high prices have more than 
doubled the cost of living. As a result, the Social Security Program laid out 
thirteen years ago is next to meaningless. Average payments being made to 
recipients of Old Age Benefits today run somewhere in the neighborhood of 
twenty-five dollars per month. Obviously no man can even exist on that 
amount in these days of extremely high prices. The pressure for liberalization 
of the existing law is tremendous. That something will be done about it 
shortly seems certain. 

All efforts to liberalize Social Security went for naught in the 80th Con- 
gress, that notoriously anti-labor Congress which passed the Taft-Hartley Law. 
However, by its fine showing of strength in the 1948 election, organized labor 
changed the complexion of Congress considerably. A great many anti-labor 
Congressmen were replaced by men more sympathetic to the needs and de- 
sires of the common people. When the 81st Congress met, revision of the 
Social Security Law was one of the first matters placed on the agenda. A great 
battle developed. The men sent to Congress with labor support fought long 
and hard for a new and better Social Security Law. They had plenty of oppo- 
sition, for, despite its great showing at the polls in 1948, organized labor, by 
a scant margin of fourteen seats in the House and five seats in the Senate, 
failed to send to Washington a Congress dominated by liberal men. The fight 
lasted throughout the first session of the 81st Congress. Months rolled by 
while the reactionary forces managed to keep Social Security amendments 
bottled up in one committee after another. It looked as if Social Security was 
doomed. But in the last days of the session, the liberals managed to bring the 
question on the floor of the House. Once the matter reached the floor, many 
reactionary Congressmen who fought liberalized Social Security in closed 
committee meetings had to come out in favor of it in open session. As a result, 
the House passed H.R. 6000, a measure that liberalizes the Social Security 
Law considerably. However, the Senate took no similar action. 

There the matter rests today. The action taken on H.R. 6000 by the House 
last year still stands since this is the second session of the same Congress. As 
yet the Senate has done nothing. Some time this year Social Security will reach 
the Senate floor. The Senate may pass the same bill as the House or it may 
pass a different bill; in which case differences would have to be resolved by 
compromise. However, since the House has already passed H.R. 6000, chances 
are that it will set the pace for whatever changes will be made in Social Se- 
curity. Therefore it is important that all members know what changes H.R. 



THE CARPENTER 



6000 proposes to make in the existing Social Security Law. Listed herewith 
are major re\-isions contained in H.R. 6000 and a comparison of the bill with 
the existing law: 



PRESENT LAW H.R. 6000 

COVERAGE 

1. Workers in commerce and industry. 1. ^^^orkers in commerce and industry. 

2. Self employed. 

3. Regularly employed domestic workers. 

4. Employees of non-profit organizations. 

5. Employees of State and local govern- 
ments on a voluntary basis. 

BENEFITS FOR BENEFICIARIES ALREADY DRAWING BENEFITS 

Now Drawing Will Draw 

$10 $25 

15 31 

20 36 

25 44 

30 51 

35 55 

40 60 

45 64 

FORMULA FOR THOSE WHO RETIRE LN FUTURE 

40% of 1st $50 average monthly wage. 50% of first SIOO. 

10% of next S200. 10% of next S200. 

Plus 1% of tliis amount for each year of Plus ^2% of tlais amount for each year oi: 

work. work. 

Minimum benefit $10. Benefits are reduced proportionately for 

Maximiun for family $85. each year not spent in covered employ- 

ment. 
Minimum S25 for Wage Earner. 
Maximum for family $150. 

EXAMPLE EXAMPLE 

A ijian now 65 and retiring has averaged If H.R. 6000 became law, the same 

S200 a month since tlie law went into effect man's benefits would be figured as follows: 

t ^^'' l/^'^'^fi *^^^/-^^'^f § ^^''' ^"^^ ^^^^- 50% of the first $100 $50.00 

fits would be figured as follows: ^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^. ^j^^^ .^ ^^^ ^^ 5^0^ ^q Oq 

40% of the first S50 $20.00 

10% of the rest, that is 10 %c of $150 15.00 Total $60.00 

rp„. 1 r,-, - an Plus Vz % for each year worked; tliat 

lotal $00.00 . , ,^ ,. 1/ c Q on 

IS 13 tmies ¥2% 3.90 

Plus 1 % for each year covered; that 

is 13 years times 35c $ 4.55 So his monthly benefit would be — S63.90 

So his monthly benefit would be $39.55 NOTE: A%"erage monthly earnings are 

figiu-ed tlie same way. However, under 

NOTE: Average monthly earnings are H.R. 6000 a worker woidd be penalized 

arrived at by di\'iding total money earned ¥2% for each year not worked in co\ered 

during the 13 years by 156 months, the total emploj-ment. But H.R. 6000 makes provi- 

number of months in 13 years; which means sions for total disability before age 65, 

months not worked are counted in too, thus which the present bill ignores, 
tending to bring down the average. 

PRESENT LAW H.R. 6000 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

iy2% on first $3000 for employee and em- 1. iy2% on first $3600 for employer and 
plo\'er. employee. 

2. Self employed 2^4% on first $3600. 



THE CARPENTER 9 

INSURED STATUS 

$50 in wages in calendar quarter is "Quar- Raised to $100 per quarter, 
ter of Coverage", 

Fully Insured 1. Same or 

1, % of number of quarters from 1937 or 2. Same. 

age 21 to age 65 or death, or 3. 20 quarters out of the 40 preceding 

2. 40 quarters. death. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR WAGE EARNER'S BENEFITS 

1. 65 years old. Same. 

2. Be fully insured. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR WIFE'S BENEFITS 

1. 65. 1. Same. 

2. Living with husband. 2. Same. 

3. Wife of retired beneficiary. 3. Same. 

4. % of Primary Insurance Benefits of hus- 4. Same. 

band. 5. Eligible if under 65 if she has a child 

under 18 in her care. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR CHILDREN'S BENEFITS 

1. Each child under 18 receives % Primary 1. Same, plus % of PIB divided among all 
Insurance Benefit. children. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR WIDOW'S CURRENT INSURED BENEFITS 

1. Legal widow. 1. Same. 

2. Mother of child under 18. 2. Same. 

3. Living with or supported by husband. 3. May be divorced but must have been 

supported by husband. 

LUMP SUM DEATH PAYMENT 

1. Paid when no one entitled to monthly 1. Paid in all cases, 
benefits. 

2. Six times primary benefit. 2. Three times primary benefit. 

WORK LIMITATION 

1. Worker not entitled to benefits if he 1. Amount is raised to $50. 

earns more than $14.99 per month. 2. Earnings limitation removed completely 

for all over 75. 

PERMANENT AND TOTAL DISABILITY 

No Provisions. 1. Disability payments start 1/1/51. 

2. Permanently and totally disabled. 

3. 20 of last 40 and 6 of last 13 quarters. 

4. Waiting period of six months. 

5. Under 65. 

6. Same rate as Old Age Insurance Pay- 
ments. 

7. Payments reduced when Workman's 
Compensation payable. 

'.' 8. No payment for dependents. 

This is a comparison of the most important provisions of the Act. It is not 
intended to include minor technical changes of lesser importance. 

While the formulas herein laid down are accurate, it should be emphasized 
[that Social Security, both under the existing law or under H.R. 6000 if passed, 
is complicated. One worker may get back many times what he pays in while 
[.; another may not even get back as much. Each case is different, and age, num- 
[ber of quarters worked in covered employment, age of dependents, etc., all 
! have a bearing on what a worker or his survivors will get. Anyone interested 
I in knowing where he stands in his Social Security Account should contact the 
iclosest Social Security Office where he can get complete information. 
I In Canada, too. Social Security is a pressing problem. There is much agi- 
i tation for a real Social Security program throughout the provinces. Here, too, 
sorely needed revision seems to be in prospect in the near future. 



10 



The Ramparts We Watch 



LIKE MOST of its contemporaries, the Indianapolis Times is not noted 
for its liberal bias. On the contrar}'. and mostly with prett\' good cause, 
we ma}" add. the Indianapolis link in the Scripps-Howard chain has 
often been accused b>" working people of going out of its way to belittle social 
legislation and stigmatize organized labor whenever possible. Year in and 
year out the Tmies has sung the same old tune that the commercial press has 
long since made its theme song— Social securit)" is socialistic; pubHc housing is 
a demoralizing influence on rugged individualism; the labor movement is a 
racket dominated by a few 'T)osses". Indianapolis readers of the sheet have 
come to expect such tripe in the Times as standard. 
Therefore it must ha\'e been quite — 



a shock to many of them to read in 
the January 25 issue an article by 
Harold H. Hartley, Times Business 
Editor, admitting what we ha^"e long 
contended— that some people have it 
tough these days. Because it contains 
more than a grain of truth, we here- 
\^"ith reprint tlie article: 

HOUSING GOUGE TURNS MEN 
RED 
' By H. H. Hartley. 
Times Business Editor 

^^'ant to know how to make a Com- 
munist of a man who finds the Amer- 
ican way is forcing him to listen to 
promises of "a better way"? 

Take any bo\' who sang the "Star- 
Spangled Banner' and studied the 
multiphcation tables, and learned the 
glowing history of his countr\"'s 
founding— take the boy. get him mar- 
ried, let him start to find a place to 
live if his wages are low. 

If he is earning about S40 a week 
on a labor job, he finds most of his 
money goes to the food store, the 
clothing store and for the bare es- 
sentials. 

He finds he has to rent 'light house- 
keeping" rooms to get started. There 



are plent>" of them, made-over houses, 
with cheap partitions, sometimes not 
e\en reaching the ceiling, witli a com- 
munity" bathroom, shared by the rest 
of the roomers. 

For this he has to pay from 815 to 
S20 a week. Add that up and you get 
from S65 to SSo a month, high rent for 
a man making S40 a week. .\nd there 
is no chance for him to accumulate 
even the few dollars necessary- to 
make the down payment e\e\\ on a 
thrift home with FHA help. 

^^"hen he needs something for him- 
self, his \^ife or his home, he usually 
has to "finance it." There he gets 
caught again with high interest rates. 
The poor fellow has nothing left. 

He is constantly mired in debt with 
no chance to get out. 

He is caught in a treadmill, living 
from hand to mouth with barely 
enough money to squeeze in a movie 
exery three or four months. 

And wiXh his SSO a month rent for 
a cheap furnished "apartment'' his 
tangle with the finance companies, 
and maybe his union dues, he can 
easily become a lost and hopeless 
man, searching for "a better way." 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



That is where the Communists get 
their footholds, among the rent- 
gouged, low-wage workers who pay 
too much for too little, and can never 
have anything left. 

There is more of this than you sus- 
pect here in Indianapolis, and right 
now the government, through a de- 
tailed survey, is trying to find out 
what the conditions actually are— and 
what can be done about it. 

But that is the way the boy with 
the clear soprano voice who sang the 
high notes of "The Star-Spangled Ban- 
ner" in knee pants grows up in a 
money world which tightens about 
him— and that's the way a Communist 
is made. 

It is time we did something about it 
before it is too late. 

We particularly like the last para- 
graph of Hartley's article. It is indeed 
time "we did something about it be- 
fore it is too late." And no one could 
'aeed that advice to better advantage 
'han daily papers like the Times. In 
recent years, thousand upon thou- 
sands of young men caught in a vici- 
ous economic trap like the young fel- 
low described by Hartley have joined 
I union and occasionally gone on 
itrike in an effort to better their eco- 
lomic conditions. If the Times has 
upported them once it was in an 
ssue that we missed, because every 
ime we have seen any comment by 
he Times on a labor situation it has 
ilways been in praise of the Taft- 
iartley Law and against the eco- 
lomic costliness of strikes. The work- 
'ng people have always known what 
he Times only recently has come to 
luspect. They joined unions as the 
urest and best way of securing a 
nodicum of economic justice. But 
hey have done it in spite of the daily 
'ress rather than because of any en- 
louragement it gave. 



We have always maintained that 
the one great hope of beating down 
Communism permanently in this na- 
tion has rested in the labor movement. 
Today we are more than ever con- 
vinced of the truth of that statement. 
The young squirt just starting out on 
a job is not the only fellow feeling 
the economic pinch these days. How 
about the old timer who gave every- 
thing he had to the building of this 
nation but who, through sickness or 
misfortune, was unable to accumulate 
anything for his old age? Is he happy 
on Social Security of twent>'-five dol- 
lars a month? Is that all he is entitled 
to? The unions don't thing so, so they 
are hammering away at decent pen- 
sions. How about the victims of 
technological unemployment, the 
physically handicapped, and the other 
unfortunates who lose out through no 
fault of their own? They are all peo- 
ple that organized labor concerns it- 
self about. They are all people ripe 
for Communist propaganda if nothing 
is done for them. In the final analysis, 
it is organized labor that is carrying 
the fight for economic justice for all 
groups and all people; and there is no 
more effective weapon against com- 
munism than economic justice. 

However, in many of the upper 
echelons of our society organized la- 
bor is more thoroughly distrusted 
than Communism itself. Too much of 
that distrust has been reflected in the 
daily press. It is time that some of 
these upper crusters took a realistic 
look at themselves and the present 
situation as it really exists. 

The American businessman is "ig- 
norant, abysmally ignorant, about 
what Communism is, what Commu- 
nists are," according to Prof. James 
Burnham of New York University. 
Professor Burnham, now on leave, is 
with the State Department in an ad- 
visory capacity. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Professor Burnham, whose views 
were published in the monthly Par- 
tisan Review magazine under the 
title, "The Suicidal Mania of Ameri- 
can Business," denounces the busi- 
ness man class because it is "too 
greedy, too reactionary and,, in a cer- 
tain sense, too cowardly." 

The author's indictment charges 
that: 

1. Businessmen are "irked" by the 
State Department's restrictions on ex- 
ports to the Communist Empire. 

2. The "monstrous incomes and 
profits" of the American businessman 
"are emotional explosives handed 
gratuitously to the Communist propa- 
ganda machine." 

3. "Very many businessmen do not 
know the difference between a Com- 
munist and an anarchist, democratic 
socialist or mere eccentric dissident." 

4. "Some of the businessmen, plain 
and simple reactionaries, are abso- 
lutely antiunion. They would like lit- 
erally to smash the trade unions. 
Since their likes become known (they) 
heap up grist for the Communist 
propaganda mill. 

5. Other businessmen, "from igno- 
rance or greed or both, act toward 
unions in such a way as to aid Com- 
munist-led unions against anticom- 
munist groups." 

6. Some great publishing houses 
"have distributed millions of copies of 
propagandized books by Communists 
and their fellow-travelers" and in their 
million-copied magazines, they print 
articles skillfully advancing the Com- 
munist line. 

"While the New Leader," says Pro- 
fessor Burnham, "the finest anticom- 
munist paper in the country, and a 
journal of real distinction, tilts per- 
manently on the edge of bankruptcy, 
and keeps barely going only because 



of the goodwill of its first-rate but un- 
paid contributors and the enlightened 
backing of David Dubinsky, the busi- 
nessmen write their checks to news- 
papers and magazines run by Com- 
munist united fronts or hospitable to 
Communist-line authors." 

The author, whose article is a se- 
lection from his book to be published 
in February called "The Coming De- 
feat of Communism," says that during 
the 1949 recession, "shabby schemes 
for evading (State Department) re- 
strictions, by indirect sales through 
Holland, Belgium and other interme- 
diary nations, were worked out." 

"Though the British aid to German 
rearmament and the American sales 
of iron and oil to Japan," he writes, 
"are the freshest and most painful of 
examples, history, experience and 
common sense are fatuously disre- 
garded. It would not, of course, be 
sensible to stop all trade with the 
Communist Empire. . . . But to trade 
on a big and unrestricted scale is to 
prepare suicide, or, rather, to build 
the guillotine for one's own execu- 
tioner. The inability of the Commu- 
nists to solve their economic problem 
is probably their greatest weakness, 
and our greatest protection. Are we, 
then, going to solve it for them?" 

Your businessmen regard them- 
seh^es as staunchly anticommunist 
"but because they do not understand 
Communism (and because they are 
greedy and short-sighted) they act 
frequently in ways that helps Com- 
munism," says Professor Burnham. 

"They really cannot believe that the 
Communists mean what they say," he 
writes, "just as they could not bring 
themselves to believe Hitler.- They do 
not believe that the Communists are 
serious when they declare they are 
going to conquer the world." 

Professor Burnham uses strong lan- 
guage in making his indictments. 



THE CARPENTER 13 

Whether or not he is entirely justified among the groups which represent 
is probably a debatable point. Yet the what might be called the "economi- 
truth remains that we are in the cally dispossessed" organized labor is 
midst of a great sociological upheaval, the only effective force fighting for 
Whether Communism or democracy democracy and the democratic way. 
will emerge depends on the degree of Whatever weakens labor also weak- 
economic justice which can be ens the main defensive ramparts of 
achieved for all groups within our the democratic fortress. All should 
national economic life. With and realize that. 



DEATH CALLS CHARLES H. SANDS 



Charles H. Sand passed away January 17th. In his passing not only the 
United Brotherhood but the entire labor movement of the middlewest lost a 
great and fighting champion. Born in Sweden some sixty-seven years ago, 
Brother Sands migrated to this country as a young lad, eventually locating 
permanently in Chicago. As soon as he became old enough to enter the build- 
ing trades he became a union man. Joining Local Union No. 58, he soon rose 
to prominence as a union officer and delegate to the council. When the office 
of secretary-treasurer of the Chicago District Council became vacant in 1922 
Brother Sands' efiicient and loyal record made him logical choice for that 
position. 

From 1922 until ill health compelled him to retire in 1948, Brother Sands 
filled that position capably. In addition he served many terms as vice-presi- 
dent of the State Federation. Down the years no one fought such anti-labor 
movements as the Landis Award and the anti-trust suits harder than did 
Brother Sands. His memory will always remain an inspiriation to those who 

follow in his footsteps. 

• 

BRITISH LABOR OFFICIAL VISITS GENERAL OFFICE 

Early this year the General Office was privileged to play 
host to a distinguished labor official from England. In the 
United States as a guest of the government to study Ameri- 
can production techniques, Brother G. I. Brinham, a mem- 
ber of the Executive Board of the Amalgamated Society' of 
Woodworkers (formerly the Amalgamated Society of Car- 
penters and Joiners), made it a point to visit Indianapolis 
and the General Office of our United Brotlierhood. For tlie 
better part of two days he remained in the city and during 
that time he was afforded ample opportunity to see how 
our United Brotherhood conducts its affairs. A keen and 
highly intelligent young man, Brother Brinham made the 
most of his opportunity. He expressed amazement at tlie 
efficiency and smoothness with which the General Office 
handles its voluminous and comphcated business. 

Although relatively young. Brother Brinliam has had 
wide experience in tlie English labor movement. As Execu- 
jdve Board member of tlie Amalgamated Society for the district comprising Ireland and a 
oart of Wales, he has traveled v^ddely throughout tlie British Isles. After lea^'ing Indian- 
apohs. Brother Brinham returned to England to participate in British election matters. As 
1 token of esteem, he presented General President William L. Hutcbeson witli a history of 
he Amalgamated Society. 





SIP 



TIME TO REALLY WORK 

Day by day our present state of peace 
becomes more precarious. Relations with 
Russia are deteriorating rapidly. And if the 
United States has any definite foreign policy 
capable of staving off war, few people seem 
to know it. In our very highest councils, 
half of our leaders are for one policy while 
the other half is for something entirely dif- 
ferent. Who is right and who is wrong is 
beyond the capacity of a poor old carpenter 
to decide, but with the H-bomb now ready 
to make the A-bomb look like a firecracker 
it is our ferment hope that they all get on 
the right track and soon. The way they have 
been carrying on sort of reminds us of the 
two lushes who went to see a very sick 
friend. The man's wife told them that the 
doctor was with the patient, but that one of 
them could sneak upstairs and peek through 
the door. One of the tipplers did so but was 
soon back down stairs looking very con- 
cerned. 

"Bill's very bad," he said. "The doctor 
said to him, 'Do you see red elephants with 
green eyes in the room, and monke>s on 
the wardrobe?' and Bill said 'No.' The doc- 
tor said again, 'Do you see white cock- 




*They say you can appeal best to 
union men with iust common 
scentsr 



roaches with little black dogs riding on their 
backs on the ceiling?' and Bill said 'No.' 
Then the doctor said, 'Do you see purple 
lobsters with yellow cats on the wall?' and 
Bill said 'No' again." 

"Well, what of it?" asked his companion. 

"What of it?" repeated the other, bursting 
into tears. "Bill's real bad— the room was 
full of them." 

* * * 

IT HAPPENS THAT WAY 

Sometime this month tlie last of the fifteen 
odd million men who served in the U. S. 
Armed Forces during the recent war will 
receive their rebate checks on the insurance 
they carried while in uniform. Thus several 
billion dollars of purchasing power will be 
pumped into the market places of the na- 
tion. An Indianapolis carpenter who put in 
a four-year hitch in the Army described it 
thusly: 

"As soon as I got my check my wife asked 
me to go shopping. She took me to tlie 
dressmakers, she took me to the milliners, 
she took me to the fmniture store, and be- 
fore we got home she took me to the 
cleaners." 

• • • 

SOMETHING FISHY 

That Big Business is thinking about de- 
manding a complete revision of tax laws 
seems indicated by publicity which one of 
the major employer associations is now put- 
ting out. According to this publicity. Big 
Business is even ready to accept an increase 
in its share of taxes if only some of the 
overlapping, confusing, duplicating methods 
of the present system are eliminated. 

Far be it from us to doubt tlie sincerity 
of such propaganda, but the idea of Big 
Business agreeing to higher taxes brings to 
mind the old one about the fellow buying 
the want ad. 

"I'd like to place an ad offering $500 re- 
ward for the return of my wife's cat," he 
infonned the clerk. 

That's a mighty big reward for one little 
cat," said the ad taker. 

"Not for this one," calmly replied the 
customer. "You see I drowned the blasted 
thing last week." 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



DOUBTFUL IMPROVEMENT 

The year 1949 was a year in which the 
Taft-Hartley Law supposedly reached its 
stride. 1948— the first full year in which the 
law was in effect— turned out to be some- 
diing less than encouraging to the pro- 
ponents of the law who maintained that 
Taft-Hartley was the cure-all for industrial 
relations. 

"The law hasn't had time to jell," they 
;aid when the 1948 results were evaluated. 
'Wait until 1949 when the law really gets 
■}ie kinks ironed out of it." 

Well, 1949 has now become history. 
While the number of strikes was not the 
lighest in history, the seriousness and long 
duration of many strikes made 1949 about 
as bad a year on the labor relations front 
is tliis nation has seen in some time. Despite 
the record, the Taft-Hartleyites are still try- 
ing to picture the law as a boon to indus- 
rial peace, which places them in a position 
about like the country grocer whose best 
;ustomer had a complaint. 

"I'm not going to buy any more of your 
:rackers," said the customer. "I hear the 
nice are always running over them." 

"That ain't so," replied the grocer in in- 
dignation, "Why the cat sleeps in the barrel 
?verv night." 

• * * 
TIMES HAVE CHANGED 

Once upon a time collective bargaining 
;onsisted of representatives of labor and rep- 
resentatives of management sitting around a 
:able together and thrashing out an agree- 
nent in language everybody understood. 
That was long before the Taft-Hartley Law, 
lowever. As the following example from an 
actual XLRB case involving our Brotherhood 
ndicates, collective bargaining is something 
altogether different since the Tafts and the 
hartleys entered the picture. 

This is part of the language used by the 
S'LRB in deciding whether it was lawful for 
anion members carrying truthful signs to 
conduct peaceful picketing in public places: 

"Our dissenting colleagues apparently do 
act beheve that Section 8(b) (1) (A) would 
36 substantially duplicated if Section 8(c) 
'.vere read into Section 8(b) (4) (A) because 
temporary injunctive relief under Section 
L0(1) was not available against Section 8(b) 
1) (A) conduct as it is against Section 8(b) 
.1) (A) conduct, and because no civil suit by 
an injured party could be brought under 
Section 303 of Title III for damages sus- 
ained as a consequence of acts described as 
inlawful which also constitute unfair labor 
practices under Section 8(b) (4) (A)." 



SO SAYS PAUP 

"Women," said Joe Paup in his latest 
monthly communique, "are the most unpre- 
dictable creatures on earth. A wife who can 
spot a blonde hair on a coat sleeve at ten 
paces can't see a pair of garage doors at 
four," 

• • • 

LIKE A TAXPAYER 

No wonder the little duckling 

Had his face screwed up in a frown, 

For he had just discovered 

That his first pair of pants were down. 

• • • 

PAUP DECLARES INDEPENDENCE 

In 1950, Joe Paup, Confucius of the pool 
room, in a changed man. 

In his mid-winter communique, Paup 
recently announced: 

"No longer does the Mrs. wear the pants 
in OUT house. This is a two-pants suit so now 
we each wear a pair." 

• * • 

EXPERT ADVICE 

A preacher whose congregation regularly 
spurn seats in the front of the church was 
surprised to see one man, a stranger, in the 
very first row. After the sermon, the pastor 
asked the man why he sat down in front. 
The man rephed that, being a bus driver, 
he wanted to find out how the preacher 
got people to move to the rear. 



A MAN WORKS 

n HOURS A DAY 
f^OR 37"^ AN HOUR. 
HOW MUCH DOES HE 
EARN IN 6 DAYS ? 



32. 




© 1949 ^/ifiC SrA/^y^/TZ 



**Why demoralize us with examples 
of such lousy, non-union wages and 
hourer 



16 



THE PLACE TO START 



PARADOXES ARE nothing new in politics. Years ago some sage ob- 
server stated, "politics make strange bedfellows." Never was that truer 
than it is right now. On more than one issue the communists and arch- 
conservatives are on the same side of the fence today. To the uninitiated, this 
may appear to be a strange phenomenon, but to the seasoned politician it is 
nothing more or less than practical political maneuvering. 

On the labor front, the strange divisions of political loyalties that exist | 
today seem inexplicable. Yet behind them lie ancient and solidly-entrenched ' 
political machinations of long standing. Why should Congressional repre- 
sentatives from a certain state (and there are a number of such instances) work 
diligently for repeal of the Taft-Hartley Law while at the same time the legis- , 
lature in the state capital is passing equally vicious anti-labor legislation by |l 
overwhelming majorities? Both the congressional representati\'es and the 
state legislators are elected by the people of the state. Yet one group follows 
a pro-labor line while another is just as staunchly anti-labor. To conclude 
that one group or the other is out of 



touch with the people in such in- 
stances is to underestimate the astute- 
ness of the average politician. Both 
the Congressmen and state legisla- 
tors in such instances are on their toes 
and aware of what is going on in the 
minds of their constituents. The fact 
that they take opposing lines of ac- 
tion on labor matters stems not from 
ignorance on one side or the other 
but rather from the fact that archaic 
apportionment methods deprive mil- 
lions of American citizens of true rep- 
resentation in their state legislatures. 
Particularly is this true since the war 
dislocated large segments of our pop- 
ulation. 

In most states, legislative districts 
are founded on population surveys 
that took place anywhere from fifty 
to a hundred years ago. The popula- 
tion patterns that existed in those 
days often have nothing in common 
with the patterns that exist today. 
Yet legislative seats are still rigidly 



apportioned according to the popula- 
tion figures that existed in President 
McKinley's time. 

On the other hand, Congressional 
districts are reapportioned periodical- 
ly. As the population pattern changes, 
the Congressional districts are revised 
to keep representation nearly equal. 
Consequently, people in all areas en- 
joy something akin to equal represen- 
tation in Congress. But far from it in 
many state legislatures. City dwellers 
are steadily losing out in the state 
legislatLires as rural districts tighten 
their grip on control of the legisla- 
tures through moth-eaten apportion- 
ment methods. Richard Neuberger, 
magazine writer and member of the 
Oregon Senate, exposes the vicious- 
ness of the process in a recent article 
in The Survey. In part, Neuberger 
points out: 

"During the past four or five dec- 
ades, the United States has become 
preponderantly a nation of city dwel- 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



lers. For better or for worse, people 
have migrated from the green coun- 
tryside to the brick and concrete. 
When this century began, 61 per cent 
of all Americans lived in rural areas. 
The percentage is down to 40 per 
cent now and is dropping every year. 

"But most of the legislatures of the 
forty-eight states are districted on the 
basis of the populations of 1900 or 
thereabouts, absolutely without re- 
gard to 1950. 

"We were an agrarian nation when 
these legislative seats were last ap- 
portioned, that is, when the districts 
were laid out in conformance with 
population shifts up to that time. To- 
day we are the world's foremost in- 
dustrial sovereignty, the birthplace of 
mass production and atomic power, 
yet we continue to be ruled by legis- 
latures modeled after a civilization of 
pastures and fields. This becomes 
painfully clear after a look at the 
1949 estimates of the U. S. Bureau of 
the Census upon which most of the 
figures given here are based. 

"The legislature of Mississippi has 
not been reapportioned since 1892, 
Kentucky not since 1893, Illinois not 
since 1909. Tennessee's most recent 
reapportionment was, incredibly, in 
L834. Connecticut ventured a redis- 
tricting 80 years ago; nothing has 
oeen done in the interval. Obviously 
liere is scant relationship between 
he Connecticut population structure 
irf 1870 and today. Yet the 1870 cen- 
sus determines the seats in the pres- 
ent Nutmeg legislature! 

j "My own legislative status affords 
H specific example of exactly what 
liis can mean. In the Oregon state 
;enate I represent a Portland district. 
The city has soared 230 per cent in 
population since the last reapportion- 
nent— in 1910— but in all these forty 
^ears it has not received a single ad- 
ditional senator. Our state constitu- 



tion requires that the legislature be 
reapportioned every ten years. This 
has been ignored for four decades. 

"The Oregon constitution also 
specifies that senatorial districts shall 
be equal in population. I represent 
81,000 people. A few desks away sits 
a Senator from a realm of sagebrush 
and mountains, and he represents 
7,200 people. That is the total popu- 
lation for his district. Any time there 
is a roll-call, regardless of the pro- 
posal at issue, his vote can cancel 
mine. The result, of course, is that 
each resident of this Senator's district 
in the backwoods has 11 times the 
voice in the state senate of one of my 
constituents in Portland. 

"What is the outcome in terms of 
practical legislation? 

"Our state, as one example, has a 
rigid milk control law which discrim- 
inates heavily against urban consum- 
ers by forbidding grocers to sell grade 
"A" at low prices. Again, the legisla- 
ture declined to take any positive 
steps toward slum clearance in the 
cities, but on the other hand, it cre- 
ated a potato commission with au- 
thority to levey an impost on every 
sack, regardless of boosting the price 
to consumers. Destitute children, 
again, fared far worse when it came 
to appropriations than did rural roads. 

"And, to cite one more indignit)', 
automobile license fees were doubled 
on lightweight passenger sedans, a 
city dweller's type, at the same time 
that tolls went down for a 34,000- 
pound truck and trailer. 

"I should like to emphasize that my 
colleague from the wide open spaces 
is no less conscientious or sincere 
than I. But he comes from a totally 
different realm. What does he know 
of tenements, of unbelievable traffic 
congestion, of abandoned children, of 
racial bigotry, of destitution in old 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



age? His 7,200 constituents are scat- 
tered over a vast upland. The com- 
plexities of urban life to them are 
unfamiliar hearsay. Their ranches are 
across the hilltop, as a rule, from the 
next cluster of buildings and corrals, 
and elbow room is plentiful. 

"This rural domination of our state 
legislatures is practically universal. 
St. Louis, with 816,000 people, has 
the same number of seats in the Mis- 
souri House of Representatives as 
eighteen hinterland counties, with 
158,000 peple. Hartford and Cole- 
brook each has two members in the 
Connecticut House. The population 
of Hartford is 166,000, that of Cole- 
brook 547. Los Angeles and San 
Francisco contain virtually half of 
California's residents, but qualify for 
a mere 5 per cent of the senate desks 
at Sacramento. Baltimore has 48 per 
cent of Maryland's people, yet only 
29 per cent of the state legislators. 

"The Minnesota constitution, like 
that of Oregon, requires legislative 
zones of substantially equal popula- 
tion, yet some of its House districts 
have 7,500 people, others 65,000. The 
constitution is honored strictly in the 
breach. As in so many other states, 
Minnesota's urban areas receive the 
shortest shifts. Ramsey and Henne- 
pin counties— the cities of St. Paul 
and Minneapolis— would be legally 
and mathematically entitled to at 
least five additional state senators 
and ten more representatives. De- 
spite complete justification on the 
basis of population, the two large 
cities seem unlikely to attain their 
quota. 

With labor girding on its armor for 
an all-out entrance into the political 
arena, the facts which Mr. Neuberger 
points out cannot be ignored. What 
good to repeal the Taft-Hartley Law 
if forty-eight states adopt equally 
vicious state laws which accomplish 



the same purposes as the Taft-Hart- 
ley Law? So long as state legislatures 
remain in the control of small rural 
cliques which hold their power 
through outmoded, rotten borough 
systems, industrial workers can never 
achieve very much liberal progress. 
So long as the rural citizen continues 
to have anywhere from five to ten 
times the voting strength his city 
brother has, pro-rural legislation will 
continue to be passed at the expense 
of the city dwellers. 

Strangely enough, most states in 
which the borough system keeps 
small, rural minorities in control of 
state legislatures have state constitu- 
tions which require zones of substan- 
tially equal population as the basis 
for apportioning seats in the legisla- 
tures. The difficulty stems from the 
fact that the constitutions are never 
really lived up to and no concerted 
efforts are ever made to secure com- 
pliance. 

Changing the rotten borough sys- 
tem in many states cannot be consid- 
ered an easy task. Yet it is a job that 
labor must do if it expects to make its 
political action even akin to effec- 
tive. More than a quarter of the I 
states now have anti-labor laws which I 
are even more vicious than the Taft- 
Hartley Law. Another quarter have 
laws which restrict labor to some ex- 
tent, although not as damagingly as 
the Taft-Hartley Law. Until such 
laws are repealed, labor cannot con- 
sider its political job done, and until 
outmoded apportionment laws are 
changed in many of these states, 
chances of repealing the anti-labor 
laws are small. 

The Federal government is now in 
the process of taking a new census. 
That census will reveal the true pop- 
ulation in every state. With this cen- 
sus as a basis to work from, more 
realistic apportionment divisions 
should be worked out in all states. 



i 



THE LOCKER 

By JOHN HART, Local Union 366, New York, N. V. 



This fricassee of arithmetical curiosities, oddities, short cuts, etc., etc., is compiled 
solely for amusement— or perhaps amazement. It all goes to show what we knew when 
going to school still holds true. Arithmetic is wacky. You are advised to save it for a rainy 
day. Answers, etc., are on page 30. 

No. 1 

Write down the year you were initiated 

How old were you the year the war ended? yrs. 

How long will you be in the Brotherhood this year? yrs. 

Now put down the year you were born 

Add up tliese 4 numbers, then look at the answer page 

No. 2 

Multiphcand 976 9-[-7-j-6=22 2 = 2= 4 To prove an answer in mul- 

Multiplier 379 3-i-7-J-9=19 l-f9=10 1_|-0=1 tiplication is right: Add the 

multiplicand across. Add 

8784 4 the result until only one fig- 

6832 ure is left. Do the same 

2928 witli the multiplier. Multi- 

ply the resulting figures. 

Product 369904 3+6+9+9+04-4 = 313+1=4 What you get is the check 

figure (4). The product is 
added similarly and reduced to another check figure. If the two figures are alike the 
answer is correct. If not, something is wrong somewhere. This is called the unitate system 
of proving an answer. All the above addition should be done mentally and only the check 
figures written down. Time: The usual way, 30 sees. This way, 15 sees. 

No. 3 

A number is divisible: 

By 2 if it is an even number. (You live and you learn.) 

By 3 if tlie sum of its figures is divisible by 3. Examples, 2601, 579, 14280. 

By 4 if it ends in 00 or 2 figures divisible by 4. 13700, 33128, 97672. 

By 5 if it ends in or 5. (We heard that before somewhere.) 

By 6 if it is an even number divisible by 3. 2604, 10008, 7710. 

By 8 if it ends in 000 or 3 figures divisible by 8. 33000, 73216, 9720. 

By 9 if the sum of its figures is divisible by 9. 783, 8001, 111330. 

No. 4 

Which figure do you make poorest? Multiply it by 9. Now multiply 12345679 (no 8) by 
what you got. If you need more practice multiply the following: 

37 37 37 37 37 37 37 37 37 Now figures out why the num- 
3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 ber 37 should be so peculiar. 

I No. 5 

ASTRONOMY. Lesson No. 108 

Distance of the earth from the sun is about 108 times diameter of the sun. 
Distance of the earth from the moon is about 108 times diameter of the moon. 
, The calculated diameter of the sun is about 108 times diameter of the earth. 

No. 6 

28657 To prove an answer in addition. Add up the first or unit coltmin. 

79669 42 (42) Carry nothing. Add the ne.xt column (38). Put it down one 

74375 38 figvire back from the previous one. And so on until all columns 

57958 33 are added. Step back each result. Now add up in the usual way. 

89487 45 This might be a good way to do the addition in the first. Put the 

" 38576 33 figures directly underneath. If interrupted you can always pick up 

where you left oflF. 

378722 378722 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



No. 7 
A man found a wallet containing 6 bills totaling $58.00. He kept one bill for himself 
and divided the remaining 5 between his wife and daughter so that each received an equal 
amoimt. What were the 6 bills? 

No. 8 
After selling 10 per cent of his land a farmer had 100 acres left. What was the original 
size of his farm? 

No. 9 

Strike out 100 points with 4 continuous straight lines in this way: First 
stroke, 20. Second, 20. Third, 30. Fourth, 30. Start an^'^A'here. Make 
your line as long as you wish. There are 8 ways to do this. 

LOLLIPOPS (Children Only) 



10 


10 


10 


10 


20 


10 


10 


10 


10 



Riley's cat went up a tree 

^^^hich was sixty feet and three. 

Every day she climbed eleven. 

Every night she slipped down seven. 

Figure out for mom and pop 

When her paws would reach tlie top. 

B 

How much is lost by measuring 20 ft. of 
rope with a yardstick which has the last 3 
inches cut off? 



Which costs most? Half a dozen dough- 
nuts at a dozen pennies a half a dozen or a 
dozen oranges at half a dozen nickels a 
dozen and a half. 
D 

(d) (b) 

Solve: 5+9x3-7= 10-:-2-f 10x2= 

E 

Write the figures 1234567 in rotation to 
form a sum in addition totaling 100. 



Helped President Wilson at Paris 




This is the AFL delegation which helped advise President Woodrow 
Wilson at the Paris Peace Conference from January to April, 1919. Seated 
(1. to r.), First Vice-President James Duncan and President Samuel Gompers. 
Standing (1. to r.). Third Vice-President Frank Duffy, Fourth Vice-President 
William Green, now AFL President, and former Third Vice-President John R. 
Alpine. Vice-President Alben W. Barkley told those at the Gompers Memorial 
Dinner Jan. 5, 1950, that "there was no man in America upon whom ^^^oodrovv 
Wilson leaned more heavily or confidently than upon Samuel Gompers." 



21 



Solomon and Sarah (Rood) Gompers, 
both of whom had been born in Hol- 
land. They were wage-earning folk. 

After four years of schooling, young 
Gompers was apprenticed to the shoe- 



GOMPERS THE PEERLESS 

* • 

THE WORLD OF LABOR has produced only one Sam Gompers. 
Few leaders in any field of endeavor have so influenced their era 
and succeeding decades as did Samuel Gompers by his life-long service 
in the cause of labor. 

From a shoemaker's apprentice at ten to undisputed world labor leader, 
the life of this English-born son of Dutch parents gave leadership to trade 
unionism in the United States and spiritual inspiration to working people 
throughout the world. 

Today, more than 25 years after his 
death, the prophetic philosophy of 
Samuel Gompers guides the destinies 
of millions in the trade union move- 
ment in North America. 

Samuel Gompers was one of the 
most unusual and versatile leaders 
the labor movement has ever pro- 
duced. 

A man of little formal schooling, 
he studied throughout his life and 
discussed problems of politics, eco- 
nomics, and world affairs with the 
best of his contemporaries. 

A man from humble circum- 
stances, he had a deep apprecia- 
tion for the cultural pursuits of 
literature, music, and the arts and 
numbered among his friends many 
from the world of art and enter- 
tainment. 

A man who had to fight his way 
upward at a time when unionism 
was frowned upon, he became a 
great leader recognized the world 
over as the champion of working 
people. Sam Gompers led a full 
life and an unselfish one devoted to 
the cause he held most dear— union 
■ labor. 

Samuel Gompers was born in Lon- 
don January 27, 1850, the son of 




SAMUEL GOMPERS 

makers' trade but soon tiu-ned to the 
trade followed by his father, cigar- 
making. At 13 years of age the family 
moved to America, and in this country 
young Sam completed his apprentice- 



90 



THE CARPENTER 



ship and became a journeyman work- 
er. He joined the Enghsh-speaking 
Cigarmakers' Union in New York 
City, old Local No. 15. 

Young Gompers early exhibited a 
characteristic which led to his active 
participation in union affairs and 
and helped to carry him to the top of 
its councils— his love of people. He 
was attracted by the humanitarian 
aspect of lodge and fraternal work 
and gave considerable time to it in his 
early days. 

He soon saw that labor organiza- 
tion work offered greater dividends in 
terms of humanitarian ser\-ice than 
did fraternal activities and so he soon 
turned to trade unionism and made it 
his life's work. He held Card No. 1 in 
the Cigarmakers' International Union 
and served as president of Local No. 
144 from 1876-1881. He was delegate 
to the international con\-ention of his 
union from 1877 through the 24th 
convention in 1922. He was second 
vice president for 12 years. 1887-96 
and first vice president thereafter. 

But the boundless energy and zeal 
of this cigarmaker could not be con- 
tained in one union. He was active 
with others in tr\ing to weld together 
the diverse and disunited forces of la- 
bor into one national or international 
federation. He worked at his trade 
until he was 37 and devoted his spare 
time to union organization work. 

He worked with other pioneers to 
form a national federation in 1881 and 
served three years as president and 
two >ears as member of the legisla- 
ti\"e committee, ^'\lth the formation 
of the American Federation of Labor 
proper in 1886 Gompers was elected 
president at the magnificent salar)- of 
81,000 per year and expenses. 

Samuel Gompers distinguished him- 
self as a pioneer and a leader in labor, 
as a strong participant in international 



affairs, and as a writer on subjects 
about or affecting the welfare of 
workers. 

He served as president of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor from 1886 
until his death in 1924, with the ex- 
ception of one year. Substantial gains 
for workers were made and the foun- 
dations which were to be the basis for 
AFL success were laid. 

President Gompers advocated eco- 
nomic organization as a means of 
serving trade unions and he felt that 
economic mobilization of strength 
along non-partisan lines would lead to 
success. 

He fought from the earliest stages 
of his career the infiltration of ex- 
treme radicals, the forerunners of 
present day communists, into the A. 
F. of L. 

He particularly opposed their at- 
tempts to inveigle the A. F. of L. into 
an independent political movement 
and thereby make labor the tail of a 
political kite. 

Gompers expressed the political 
policy of labor through his famous 
doctrine: "Stand faithfully by our 
friends and elect them. Oppose our 
enemies and defeat them; whether 
they be candidates for President, for 
Congress, or other officers; whether 
Executive, Legislative, or Judicial"— 
a polic}" adopted today by all con- 
structive parts of American labor. 

In 1906 he submitted a Bill of 
Grie\"ances to responsible political 
representati\"es and this marked the 
beginning of effective presentation by 
organized labor of its cause to legis- 
lators. To Sam Gompers chiefly is 
due the enactment into law of that 
fundamental economic principle: the 
labor of a human being is not a com- 
modit}\ 

Although a pacifist, Gompers felt it (,, 
his duty to lead in his capacity the I 



r^ 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



support in the fight for democracy in 
World War I. His knowledge of and 
interest in the welfare of European 
workers placed him in an exceptional 
position to aid the war effort. 

' He served on the Advisory Council 
jf National Defense and was instru- 
nental in organizing the first War La- 
bor Committee to develop labor pol- 
cies until a government-created body 
:ame into existence. 

He was active on behalf of the AFL 
n developing labor policies and 
itandards and in seeing that labor was 
Droperly represented on war boards. 
\n effective speaker, he aided mate- 
•ially in the Liberty Loan drives. 

But aiding in the war effort did not 
nark his only participation in inter- 
lational affairs. President Gompers 
lerved in 1895, 1909, and 1918 as fra- 
emal delegate from the AFL to the 
British Trades Union Congress and in 
.909 was unofficial representative at 
he International Secretariat. Ten 
'ears later he served as AFL delegate 

the International Federation of 
Trade Unions. 

1 Always anxious to improve the wel- 
are of workers the world over, Presi- 
lent Gompers was active in founding 



the Pan American Federation of La- 
bor in 1918 and was its president from 
its establishment until his death. 
Presidents Obergon and Calles of 
Mexico called Gompers Mexico's 
greatest and most intelligent friend 
during the period of revolution. Brit- 
ain's premier, Lloyd George, and 
France's Clemenceau hailed him as 
one of the Allies' greatest supporters. 

Throughout his career Gompers 
wielded an effective pen. He felt that 
the broad educational work to be 
done for and with labor was a chal- 
lenge to his best efforts. In his full 
and busy life he wrote five books, 
more than two dozen pamphlets, and 
countless articles in magazines. He 
was editor of The American Federa- 
tionist from 1894 with the issuance of 
Volume I, until his death with Vol- 
ume 31 in 1924, with the exception of 
one year. 

Gompers died as he lived, literally 
"in harness." He was returning from 
Mexico and had just been reelected 
AFL president and Pan American 
Federation of Labor president. He 
died in San Antonio, Texas, Decem- 
ber 13, 1924, and was buried five days 
later in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, 
Tarrytown, New York. 



DENHAM'S BIAS GLARES IN ATTACK ON NLRB 

General Counsel Robert N. Denliam of the National Labor Relations Board cleared 
p a few tilings in a speech in New York City: 

1. He admitted that the principles of the Taft-Hartley Act and the Wagner Act are 
|ls far aoart as the Doles. 

2. He implied that only he was fit to interpret Taft-Hartley and that the members of 
lie National Labor Relations Board were wrong when they differed with him. 

. 3. He urged employers to challenge any decision of the board where Denham was 
vemiled. In other words, Denham always supports management's interests. 

Denham, whose pro-management bias has been apparent to trade unionists for some 
one, spoke at a meeting of the Building Trades Employers Association of New York City. 

The trouble witli the NLRB, Denliam told employers, is that there are too many 
ersons in the organizations who are "saturated" witli Wagner Act principles. And tlie 
ouble with Denham is that he's "saturated" witli pro-management principles of Taft- 
lartley. 

Denliam is the man, you remember, who told the National Farm union it had no rights 
nder Taft-Hartley, but that T-H could be used to break tlie union. 

Denham's latest outburst emphasizes exactly where he stands. 



Editorial 




A Positive Approach Is Needed 

Among the many actions taken by the Executh'e Council of the American 
Federation of Labor at its mid-winter meeting in Miami last month was a 
strong and emphatic veto of any move on the part of the United States gov- 
ernment to accord full diplomatic recognition to Spain under the totalitarian 
heel of Dictator Franco. As a basis for its position the AFL Council said: 

"We are convinced tlmt the reasoning underlying the proposal 
to extend full recognition would inevitably lead our government 
from one fatal blunder to another. We cannot accept as a pre- 
mise that in the present explosive international situation—in 
which communist totalitarianism is the main danger of war— 
diplomatic recognition by the world's leading democracy has no 
moral implications whatsoever. 

"On this basis our government could logically hasten to ex- 
tend such recognition to the communist usurpers who, with the 
aid of imperialist Russia, have overthrown the legally-constituted 
government of China which was the very first one to resist totali- 
tarian aggression. 

"Nor can we agree tvith the contention that an American 
ambassador in iSIadrid could serve to hasten political and eco- 
nomic reform in Spain. 
^ "On the contrary, such recognition only paves the way for 

extensive financial aid to a despicable despotism now in the 
throes of a crisis, ichich, if not alleviated by outside aid, can lead 
only to its doom." 

How much weight the AFL recommendations against recognition of Spain 
will carry is problematical. Recent history has pro\-ed that time after time 
organized labor has been on the right track in international matters, but time 
after time its advice has been ignored. In 1933 and 1934 organized labor was 
urging economic sanctions against Hitler but the government paid no heed. 
Instead it followed the dictates of industrialists who were investing money 
in the Nazi regime and building up the Frankenstein monster which cost us 
millions of dollars and many lives to destroy. A little later organized labor 
was protesting the shipment of oil and steel scrap to Japan, but again its 
ad\"ice was disregarded in favor of the advice of those who were making 
money out of dealing with the Japanese regime which poured death and 
destruction on Pearl Harbor a few years afterwards. Today the AFL advice 
on Spain is sound, but again there are those who see profits in dealing with 
Franco, and it is too much to expect that profits will cease influencing our 
foreign policy after all these years in which profits have been the paramount 
consideration. 



THE CARPENTER 25 

Somewhere in the Good Book it says it is impossible to defeat evil by con- 
sorting with evil. Certainly the last ten years should have proved this point. 
To combat the evil of Nazism we consorted with communism. As a result 
we vanquished one e\il only to find an equally sinister one sitting on our door- 
step. We moved from one blunder to another. Can we now, by reversing the 
process and consorting with Franco's evil fascism to combat the evil of com- 
munism, gain anything in the long run? The AFL Executive Council thinks 
not. 

On this entire matter of combating communism, it would seem the time 
has arrived for the United States to take a good look at its hole card. Since 
the war, untold billions have been poured into all parts of the world. 

Results to date are questionable at best. China has been lost to the Reds. 
In Itah' and France, anti-communist governments totter along riding out one 
crisis after another by the skin of their teeth. And right here at home over 
half a million citizens carry cards in the communist party, according to a 
recent release by the FBI. Somehow or other it seems the time is ripe for an 
o^'erhauling of our techniques. 

First and foremost, this nation can no longer afford to ignore communism 
at home while spending billions to fight it abroad. So far the only concrete 
step that has been taken against communism has been the setting up of a 
non-communist aflfidavit for union officers. Communists can sit in Congress 
and tlie state legislatures, and in some instances we suspect they really do. 
Men who, if they are not, certainly act like communists hold high positions in 
many branches of government. No one asks employers whether or not they 
are communists at any time. Yet of all the forces that are aligned against 
communism, organized labor is the most effective. Paradoxically, it is the 
only segment of our population where a non-communist affidavit is required. 
If a non-communist affidavit is okay for union officers why not for legislators 
and employers and businessmen and teachers? Why not for doctors and law- 
yers and professional men? 

Elsewhere in this issue is an article from an Indianapolis paper telling how 
the economic squeeze turns a loyal young American into a communist. Against 
that economic squeeze, organized labor is the one effective w^eapon. Em- 
ployer's groups and Chambers of Commerce think that the way to fight com- 
munism is to tell the people about how many more bathtubs the United States 
has than Russia. Organized labor thinks the way to fight communism is to 
help the guy without a tub get himself one. And therein lies the essential 
difference. Ours is the approach that will beat communism. The sooner all 
Americans see it the better. 



No One Opposes True Economy 

In politics there is no more sure-fire formula for building popularit)^ and 
winning votes tlian talking of tax reductions. No one likes to part with a 
chunk of his income for taxes; and it seems the bigger the income, the more 
true is this statement. With the budget for the next fiscal year now under con- 
sideration, a great hue and cry about economy in government and a reduction 
in taxes is reverberating through the halls of Congress. Opponents of all 
progressive legislation are using the budget hearings as a sounding board for 



26 THE CARPENTER 

voicing their opposition to social security legislation and housing legislation 
and all the other legislation that proposes to make life a little better for the 
working man. Economy and more economy is their battle cry on all liberal 
legislation and they fight every progressive measure on that basis. 

With their avowed intention of cutting down taxes no one can disagree. 
Taxes are taking too high a percentage of the average man's income and any 
and all economies that can be effected should be instituted as soon as possible. 
But tax programs ought to be realistic. They ought to put first things first. 
This is where the "price-tag" Congressmen fall down badly. They ignore 
matters that concern the welfare of millions of people and deal lavishly with 
special projects that catch their fancy. What they actually do is use budget 
matters for political footballs to advance their own interests and the interests 
of their party. 

These economizers particularly single out the federal government's "wel- 
fare" policies as evidence of extravagant spending. An analysis of the national 
budget will show that 75 cents out of every tax dollar is spent for defense, 
foreign aid, veterans' benefits and interest on the war debt. The welfare 
departments take a minute fraction of the total tax. 

In 1948 some 10.2 billion of the federal taxes collected went out for wages 
and salaries. That admittedly is a lot of money. But 62 per cent of that total 
was paid to military and civilian employes of the armed forces, leaving 38 
per cent, or less than 4 billion, for employes of all non-military agencies. 

When you deduct the IVz billion paid to post office employes from this 
4 billion, you have 2y2 billion left for the employes of all other civilian agencies 
including the welfare departments, leaving little room for economy. 

Undoubtedly fairly substantial economies in the operation of our Federal 
Government can be instituted. The Hoover Commission has called attention 
to some ways and means that seem legitimate and advisable. Few will com- 
plain of economies that are justified. 

One thing we have noticed particularly— the Congressmen who thump the 
tub loudest for less government spending hesitate the least when it comes to 
appropriating money for projects that will help their own constituents. They 
want economy in the government, but they want the other forty-seven states 
to do all the economizing. When their own constituents need a new flood 
control wall or a pest control program or some other project, the economy 
Congressmen are right in there pitching for money to undertake such pro- 
grams. Which is well and good because people need to be protected from 
floods and pest invasions. But the thing that ought to be remembered is that 
if the people of one state are entitled to such consideration, the citizens of the 
other forty-seven states ought to rightfully expect similar treatment. There is 
no economy in letting people anywhere get flooded out or eaten out by insects 
or otherwise ruined through preventable acts of nature. 

Red tape, duplication, and overlapping authority are evils in the Federal 
Government that eat up tax money and should be eliminated. With the mili- 
tary usurping the biggest share of the budget, our defense plant, too, should 
be scrutinized closely for any possibilities of economy. But when it comes to 
protecting the people against the ravages of nature and the vicissitudes that 
result from our economic system, the welfare of the people must get prime 
consideration. 






Bg sure your 
Local Union 
books a showing 
of these two 
United Brother- 
hood films — 



THIS IS YOUR BROTHERHOOD 



and 



CARPENTERS HOME 




£N3vj<:K:xx>i>;?s>iK> 



Produced by authorization of the General Executive Board, 
these two films— in color and sound— show the General Office in 
action and the Lakeland Home taking care of old time members. 
There is no charge for the use of these films. They are loaned out 
by the General Office on a first come, first served basis, to Locals, 
Councils and Auxiliaries. If you haven't seen these films, urge your 
Local Union to book a showing as soon as possible. Take it up at 
the next meeting. Full details may be obtained by dropping a 
note to: 

Maurice A. Hutcheson, 

First General Vice-President, 

Carpenters Bldg., 222 E. IMichigan St. 
Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



Gbnbbal Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



.Ghneral President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Acting Secretart 

ALBERT E. FISCHER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 
First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 

111 E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, O. WM. BLAIBB 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MDIB 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZEB 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTBL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the Acting Secretary 



NOTICE 

\\^ithm the next few months the registration books in most states will be 
closed. Citizens who are not registered by the time the books are closed in 
their respective states will be unable to vote in the highly important national 
election scheduled for November. The November election will in large 
measure determine whether this nation will strive to build a way of life that 
can guarantee each citizen a maximum of security against unemployment, 
illness and the uncertainties of a penniless old age, or whether there shall be a 
return to the rugged individualism of tlie Hoover era. The voters will decide 
the issue at the ballot box. 

E\'ery working man has a big stake in the outcome. Therefore every mem- 
ber of the United Brotherhood should be registered so that he can vote his 
convictions in November. Good intentions are fine, but ballots are the only 
things they count. The best intentions in the world cannot help a bit in 
electing the kind of a Congress that the working people of the nation want. 
You have to cast your ballot, and in order to do so, you must be in a position 
to vote by being registered. Register yourself and then urge the members of 
your family and your friends to do likewise. 



21 tt 0ittntivxscxn 



Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more 



%tBt in l^tutt 

Th* Editor ham b«€n requested to publith the namee 
of the following Brothers who have passed away. 



JOHN ABEL, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
W. H. ARD, L. U. 626, Wilmington, Del. 
ARNOLD P. ASHER, L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
HARRY G. BACON, L. U. 626, Wilmington, 

Del. 
ALEXANDER BAIN, L. U. 1149, Oakland, Cal. 
FRANK BAIN, L. U. 162, San Mateo, Cal. 
SIDNEY J. BARTON, L. U. 1622, Hayward, Cal. 
HARRY W. (Dad) BLEAM, L. U. 1289, Seattle, 

Wash. 
WM. BLOEDEL, L. U. 460, Wausau, Wis. 
M. BREAULT, L. U. 1360, Montreal, Que., Can. 

D. L. BURK. L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 

J. W. COCHRAN, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

E. E. CROFT, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

C. J. CROWLEY, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

ROBERT M. DAVIDSON, L. U. 1622, Hayward, 
Cal. 

FRANK J. EVASKA, L. U. 30, New London, 
Conn. 

LUTHER A. EZZELL, L. U. 986, McAlester, 
Okla. 

EDGAR W. FAULKNER, L. U. 626, Wilming- 
ton, Del. 

FRANK FULTON, L. U. 1622, Hayward, Cal. 

FRED GOUDY, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 

EDWARD J. GRILLOT, L. U. 1206, Norwood, 
Ohio 

JOE A. HAMILTON, L. U. 1622, Hayward, Cal. 

B. F. HANNAH, L. U. 1278, Gainesville, Fla. 

JOHN T. HELLEGERS, L. U. 490, Passaic, N. J. 

GEORGE HEUSTON, L. U. 626, Wilmington, 
Del. 

FRANK HILLIARD, L. U. 500, Butler, Pa. 

JAMES A. HOWLETT, L. U. 33, Boston, Mass. 

CHAS. M. HUGHES, L. U. 1335, Wilmington, 
Cal. 

J. J. JACKSON, L. U. 764, Shreveport, La. 

FRITZ J. JOHNSON, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 

HAROLD W. JOHNSON, L. U. 298, Long Is- 
land, N. Y. 

HYLAND B. JOHNSON, L. U. 1407, Wilming- 
ton, Cal. 

ROBERT C. JOHNSON, L. U. 1622, Hayward, 
Cal. 

WILLIAM H. KELLER, L. U. 379, Texarkana, 
Tex. 

FRANCIS J. KENNEDY, L. U. 162, San Mateo, 
Cal. 

CLEVA KNIGHT, L. U. 601, Henderson, Ky. 

LEIBERT KNIGHT, L. U. 734, Kokomo, Ind. 

WILLIAM KUHL, L. U. 1622, Hayward, Cal. 

EDWIN JOHN KYLLONEN, L. U. 1335, Wilm- 
ington, Cal. 

W. A. LAN WAY, L. U. 1622, Hayward, Cal. 



DAVID LINDSAY, L. U. 162, San Mateo, CaL 
SETH T. LOCKRIDGE, L. U. 665, Amarillo, 

Tex. 
FRANK LOCKWOOD, L. U. 210, Stamford, 

Conn. 
JOHN MILES MACDONALD, L. U. 1149, Oak- 
land, Cal. 
WILLIAM J. MCDONALD, L. U. 33, Boston, 

Mass. 
HENRY F. MARTIN, L. U. 1335, Wilmington, 

Cal. 
LOUIS MILLER, L. U. 584, New Orleans, La. 
JOSEPH J. MITCHELL, L. U. 1407, Wilming- 
ton, Cal. 
OTTO MOOR, L. U. 1622, Hayward, Cal. 
HENRY VINCENT MYERS, Sr., L. U. 530, Los 

Angeles, Cal. 
JOHN OLSON, L. U. 1397, Mineola, N. Y. 
JAMES L. ORMAN, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 
ALBERT PARK, L. U. 871, Battle Creek, Mich. 
JOSEPH S. PEREIRA, L. U. 1622, Hayward, 

Cal. 
PETER M. PETERSON, L. U. 1622, Hayward, 

Cal. 
ORVILLE DEAN POLAND, L. U. 746, Norwalk, 

Conn. 
L. C. PRESTON, L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Tex. 
WILLARD S. RICHARDS, L. U. 626, Wilming- 
ton, Del. 
FAYE RICHARDSON, L. U. 770, Yakima, 

Wash. 
JACK ROACH, L. U. 11, Cleveland, Ohio 
VICTOR SACRISON, L. U. 210, Stamford, 

Conn. 
JAMES SCHOLEY, L. U. 1149, Oakland, Cal. 
WILLIAM J. SCHULER, L. U. 188, Yonkers, 

N. Y. 
W. A. SEAY, L. U. 1278, Gainesville, Fla. 
JOHN SELDAT, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
W. J. SHELBY, L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Tex. 
H. RALPH STERN, L. U. 201, Wichita, Kans. 
EVERETT STOGSDILL, L. U. 133, Terre Haute, 

Ind. 
ANDREW SZYMONIAK, L, U. 1757, Buffalo, 

N. Y. 
VANDEL TAPLICSKY, L. U. 626, Wilmington, 

Del. 
GEO. W. THACHER, L. U. 61, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
JOSEPH VITALE, SR., L, U. 11, Cleveland, 

Ohio 
JEROME WALLACE, L. U. 162, San Mateo, 

Cal. 
EARL WARNER, L. U. 770, Yakima, Wash. 
JOHN W. WILLIS, L. U. 1622, Hayward, Cal. 
ALFRED ZIMMER, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 




30 THECARPENTER 

ANSWERS TO "THE LOCKER" 

1. 13895. Durminger couldn't do better than that. 

4. If done correctly your answer should consist of the chosen figure repeated several times 
and no other. This 37 business is too much for us, 

5. Just in case you're curious or dubious: 

Distance of earth from sun, 93,000,000 mis. Diam. of sun, 863,000 mis. 
Distance of earth from moon 238.000 mis. Diam. of moon 2200 mis. 

Diam. of earth, 8000 mis. 

All in round numbers. Now don't spoil a good thing by being technical. 
What's a couple of thousand miles among astronomers? 

7. One fift>-. Three two's. Two one's. He kept the fift\-. His \\-i£e got two two's. His 
daughter a two and t^vo one's. 30.00-i-4.00-|-4.00= 38.00. 

8. Ill 1/9 acres. Figured by guess and by golly: If one-tenth was sold, then nine-tenths 
remain. If this is one-tenth, ten times this is the whole or original figure. 11 1/9x10^ 
111 1/9. Slow but sure. 

Figured by proportion: 10x100 = 1000 = 111 1/9. Quicker and surer. 
~90~ ~9~ 



Fair enough? 



Start 

LoUipops. 

A. 14 days. 4 ft. gained each day. At the end of 13th day, 32 ft. gained. On the 14th day 
she chmbed 11 and so reached tlie top. What happened after that wouldn't affect 
the answer. 

B. 18 inches. 6 measurements of the yardstick which should be 18 ft. only measures 16 
ft. 6 inches. There is where the 18 inches is lost. Nothing was lost in the last measure- 
ment. 

C. The oranges. 6 dozen doughnuts @ 24 cents a dozens SI. 44. 

12 dozen oranges @ 20 cents a dozens S2.40. 

D. ''a) 23. (b) 25. In problems of this land multiplication and division should be done first. 

E. 1 

2 That's one way. 

34 
56 

7 

100 

In the December issue of The Locker it was stated that the highest denomination of bill 
printed was $10,000.00. Brother Fred Whyte of the Bronx questioned this. He claimed 
there was such a thing as a $100,000.00 bill. We checked wth the Bureau of Printing and 
Engra\"ing and we found out this: There is a $100,000.00 gold certificate printed with a 
likeness of Woodrow \Mlson on the face. These notes do not enter into general circulation. 
They are issued only to Federal Reser\-e banks for business transactions with the Treasurer 
of the United States. So thanks to Brother Whyte's alertness well all look oiu: money over 
more carefully in the future. 

Brother Tarwater of San Francisco wants to know if there is any Roman date \\-i\h. more 
characters than one he saw in Xapa Valley. MDCCCLXXXVIII (1SS8). Have you seen 
an>-thing longer than that? If there is ever such a year as 1988 it probably would be uTitten: 
MDCCCCLXXX\TII, one more character. This looks more impressive than MCMLXXXVIII 
which is the same date. 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

NEWARK FLOOR LAYERS SPONSOR FINE CELEBRATION 

Essex House in Newark, New Jersey, saw one of the gayest events in its histor>' on the 
night of January 21st when several hundred members of Local Union No. 2212, together 
with their families and friends, gatliered together there to help the union celebrate its 
eleventh anniversary. Excellent food, fine entertainment and capable speaking combined to 
make the evening a great success. 

Walter Sculthorpe, chainnan of the dinner committee, welcomed the guests and ex- 
tended to General Representative Raleigh Rajoppi the toastmastership of the evening. In 

his usually capable manner he kept things 
moving at a brisk pace. *A large number of 
guests from New York and Philadelphia were 
on hand to help make the occasion a pleasant 
one. Special guest and featured speaker of 
tlie evening was O. William Blaier, General 
Executive Board member, whose assistance 
and advice have often helped the union o\er 
rough spots. 

In a short address, James P. Patterson, 
business agent of the union, recalled that the 
floor layers were really organized in 192.5 but 
tliey floundered around in another organiza- 
tion for a number of years until Brother Blaier 
helped them obtain a charter from the United 
Brodierhood in 1939. From that time on the 
progress of the floor layers under Local Union 
2212 has been steady and consistent. He 
thanked not only Brother Blaier and Rajoppi 
for their contributions to the progress of tl:ie union but also the business agents of unions 
in surrounding areas for their fine cooperation. 

Following the dinner, dancing was enjoyed until a late hour. 




(Standing, left to right) Jack Sweeney, 
business agent of New York; William Purcell, 
president, Essex D. C; Vincent J. Murphhy, 
president. State Federation; Richard O'Dris- 
coll, president, Philadelphia D. CC; Leo P. 
Carlin, Newark City Commissioner. 

(Seated, left to right) M. J. Cantwell, sec- 
retary. New Jersey State Council; James P. 
Patterson, president, Local No. 2212; Raleigh 
Rajoppi, General Representative; O. Wm. 
Blaier, G. E. B. member and featured speaker; 
Walter Sculthorpe, dinner committee chairman. 



LOCAL UNION 181 SHOWS BROTHERHOOD PICTURES 

Officers of Local 181, of Chicago, Illinois, invited all members to a social gatliering and 
a showing of the Brotherhood film. About 400 attended and after seeing tlie lovely home 
and grounds at Lakeland, Florida, tlie brothers exclaimed they had no idea it was so spaci- 
ous and beautiful. The men living there are thankful that tliey can spend their last years 
in peace. 

Brother Asgar Andrup gave a talk on tlie General Office and tlie Home and also pleaded 
to the members for voluntary contributions to defray the expenses of Labor's League for 
Political Education and explained how essential it is for all union men to defeat tlie 
Taft-Hartley Law. 

After the showing of the films, the brothers retired down stairs where tliey were served 
refreshments. A good time was had by all. 



LOCAL 980 GIVES KIDDIES XMAS TREAT 

On December 16, Local 980 of Chicago, held a pre-Christmas party mth two Christ- 
mas trees and presents for a fine group of children, of whom tliere were about 65 present. 
Many ladies, wives of members and friends, were present. The crowd was too large for 
the meeting hall and it was necessary to use a larger hall upstairs. 



THE CARPENTER 



Some fine entertainment, music and singing, furnished mostly by members of the 
families of our Local members, and including many old-time Christmas songs, was heartily 
enjoyed by all. Plenty- of refreshments were sen-ed and the whole affair was a grand suc- 
cess. Brother E. C. Logerquist was chairman of the entertainment committee, and was 
assisted by brotliers Ray Lear\' and Ephraim Jensen. 

The officers of the Local are: President Henrj' Kummers. Vice-President Oswald Larsen, 
Financial SecN" John Wahl. Recording Sec'v Tom Haves, Treasurer Lars Lindahl. 



LOCAL No. 999 GR.\DUATES APPRENTICES 




Left to right — Clarence W. Pearson present- 
ing Certificates of completion to graduating 
apprentices Lester Page, Roy Shifley, Glenn 
Duncan, Ralph Carlton, George Murphv and 
Carl White. 

Graduating apprentice Eugene Hampton also 
received a Certificate but was unable to at- 
tend the ceremony due to the fact that he had 
Joined the Navy as a Carpenter and reported 
for active duty several weeks prior to the 
ceremony. 

R. C. Hampton, Walter Jones and A. C. 
apprenticeship committee. 



\\'inding up four years of work and study, 
seven young men of Mt. \"emon, Illinois, re- 
cently received their joume>"men certificates 
amid appropriate ceremonies. At a banquet 
held at the L. and N. Cafe, a large ntmiber 
of members of Local Union 999 and friends 
and guests saw tlie young men receive their 
certificates of proficiency and welcomed them 
into the indtistr}' as qualified joume>"n:ien. 

Local Union No. 999, with the coopera- 
tion of local contractors, undertook to estab- 
lish a forward looking apprenticesliip program 
back in 1946, It took a good deal of time 
and effort, but the program was inaugurated 
and the ]0ume>"men who received their cer- 
tificates at the banquet on December 22nd 
were the first fruits borne by the program. 
Keele are union representatives on the joint 



ATCHISON HONORS APPRENTICESHIP GIL\DUATES 

On the night of February" 6th, four years of study and obser\"ation paid off for three 
young men of Atchison, Kansas, for on that evening they were handed Uriited Brotherhood 
jo\ime>TOen certificates at impressive ceremonies. The three were A\'. E. Langan, G. L. 
Gerardy and H. B. Gillen. Three other young mn— W. W. Wilson, H. W. Heintzelman and 
\V. Hundley were also eHgible to receive certificates but were not present. Jo>- C. Orr, 
president of Local Union No. 1980, made the presentations to the young men who success- 
fully completed their apprenticeship coiurses. On hand were a number of in%ited guests 
including A. L. Mathewson, St. Joe, apprenticeship representative of the Department of 
Labor, and several local contractors. .After the meeting a fine luncheon was sen"ed at 
Fedderson's \^"ith tlie Local Union acting as host. 



MONTRE.\L LOCAL PAYS TRIBUTE TO A GREAT MEMBER 

On January 12th, last, a delegation of officers of Local 134, accompanied by General 
Executive Board Member, .Arthur Martel, General Representative E. Larose and Montreal 
District Council Secretan.", L. Francoeur, waited upon Brother Edmond Berthiaume, mem- 
ber in good standing of Local lo4 of Montreal. 

The purpose of their \"isit was to honor Brotlier Bertl"iiaume and present him \^ith a 
fift>--year golden jubilee button in recognition of his fift>- years of continuous membership 
in the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of .America. 

The records show that Brother Edmond Berthiaume joined the Brotherhood on Decem- 
ber 19th, 1899. From the ver\' beginning Brother Berthiaume took an exceptionally active 
part in the affairs of tlie Brotherhood. He was a %"igorous and outspoken exponent of the 
principles, aims and aspirations our movement stands for. 

In 1902 he was elected first business agent of local 134. From that time on Brother 
Berthiaimie occupied e\"erv- position of trust and honor that could be conferred upon him 
by the carpenters of Montreal. 

The delegation, in presenting him with the 50-year membership button, conveyed to 
him the congratulations and good wishes of the Brotherhood and as a token of appreciation 
presented him with a purse as a memento of the occasion. 



THE CARPENTER 33 

MARINETTE HONORS TWO GREAT OLD TIMERS 

At a January meeting, two charter members of Local Union No. 1246, Marinette 
^^'isconsin, were honored for their more than forty-se\-en years of continuous participation 
and leadership in tlie union tliey helped so much to build. 

Following the local's business meeting, Christ Christensen and Otto Carlson were pre- 
sented with gold wrist watches by President Cleveland Jensen. The pioneer union men 
were also guests of honor at a party. 

Christensen, who is 83 years old, was initiated into tlie union August 20, 1902. He has 
served as president and secretary of the local and has been a member in good standing 
continuously since his initiation. 




Pictured above at the party honoring the two great old timers of Local Union No. 1246 
are (standing, left to right): Wm. Rogendroff, Conductor; Chas. Fifarek, Treasurer; Adolph 
Anderson, Trustee; L. P. Miller, Recording Secretary; P. Stalasen, Trustee. 

(Second row): Cleveland Jensen, President; Wm. Haines, Vice-President; J. Schultz, 
Trustee; M. Rouse, Financial Secretary, and Clarence Carlson, Warden. Seated are Christ 
Christensen and Otto Carlson, honored guests. 

Carlson is 67 years old and was initiated into the union September 18, 1902. He has 
sened three terms as president of the local and as trustee for 12 years. Also a member in 
good standing for 48 years, Carlson still takes an active part in union affairs. 

Both old timers made short speeches recalling the old days when organized labor had 
to battle for every inch of progress it made. Brother Carlson led the group in prayer, 
and botli old timers sincerelv tlianked the union for the honors accorded them. 



LOCAL 465 CELEBRATES 50TH MILESTONE 

Away back in 1900 a small group of determined carpenters in the vicinity of Ardmore, 
Pennsylvania, a Philadelphia subiurb, decided that the only effective way of fighting the 
miserable wages and working conditions that prevailed at tlie time was to organize a union. 
They held a meeting and in a short time they received charter No. 465 from the United 
Brotherhood. On the night of January 5th of this year, a large throng of members of 
Local Union No. 465, in the company of their famihes and friends, gatliered togetlier at 
JMcCallisters to commemorate tlie fiftieth anniversary of the issuing of that charter. 

It was a great evening. A fine turkey dinner with all the trimmings put e^'er>•body in 
a good humor. A number of really fine vaudeville acts added to the enjoyment of tlie 
occasion. And the three featured speakers— James J. McDevitt, president, Pennsylvania 
Federation; O. Wm. Blaier, G. E. B. member, and Lewis G. Hines, national AFL legisla- 
tive representative, completed the e\ening by not only congratulating tlie union on its fine 
record of progress but also by outlining the better world tliat lies ahead if tlie working 
people of the nation adliere to the time-honored principles first laid down by Sam Gompers. 
Thomas Keenan, president of tlie union, acted as toastmaster. 

Local Union No. 465 boasts of some fifty members witli records of continuous member- 
sliip of thirty years or more; at least fi%'e of tlieni dating clear back to 1900. All who 
attended the celebration departed convinced tliat Local Union No. 465 is destined to pro- 
vide many more years of service to the carpenters of the area. 




FORT MYERS AUXILIARY AIMS HIGH 

Greetings to all sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary 559, Fort Myers, Florida. 

We organized and received our charter November 18, 1949. At this time we have 
tvi^enty active members. 

Our roster of officers is as foUov^^s: President, Mrs. M. W. Brovi^n; Vice President, Mrs. 
E. E. Waldron; Financial Secretary, Recording Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs. R. O. 
Burchard; Conductor and Warden, Mrs. Alfred Nutgrass; Trustees, Mrs. G. H. Sheffield, 
Mrs. F. E. Baumgardt, and Miss Jo Sherry Baumgardt. 

Our regular meetings are held on the second and fourth Friday of each month in the 
hall of Carpenters' Local 2261. 

On December 23, we entertained tlie Carpenters' Local with a Christmas Party at the 
home of our president, Mrs. Brown. We were entertained by an impromptu program of 
songs and dances by our children. Carols were sung by all. Refreshments of coke and 
coffee or punch were served with gifts and candy for the children. We had a wonderful 
time. 

As we enter into the New Year, we have hopes of increasing ovir membership in a 
substantial way, and accomplishing much in a social way to establish a feeling of unity 
and good will within our Auxiliary and Local. We would be glad to hear from other 
Auxiliaries at any time. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. R. O. Biurchard, Secretary. 



BEATRICE AUXILIARY BUILDS GOOD WILL 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies' Auxiliary No. 531 of Beatrice, Nebraska. 

We^had a nice Christmas party on December 20 in our Union Hall. The committee 
prepared a delicious dinner which was served cafeteria style. The tables were prettily dec- 
orated with red candles, pine cones, Christmas bells and greenery. A small lighted tree was 
set up near the gift table with gifts for all and treats for the children. The party was a big 
success and we feel tliese social gatherings promote friendship and goodwill. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. K. D. Ulrich, Recording Secretary 



It 



of 



CHICAGO AUXILL\RY ROUNDS OUT SECOND DECADE 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 249, of Chicago, 111. 

On March 4, 1950, our brothers of Local 504 will celebrate their 50th anniversary. 
will also be the 20th anniversary of our Auxiliary. 

We are very proud of die fact that we are the only Auxiliary in our great city 
Chicago. 

We were organized at tlie height of the depression. At that time, we devoted ourselves 
to work and we helped Local 504 raise funds. When times were better, we contributed to 
all important drives such as the Community Chest, Red Cross, March of Dimes and many 
other worthy causes. 

We have socials, some of which are combined with Local 504. 

Our members are very friendly and we are like one great big family. 

We would enjoy hearing from other Auxiliaries. 

Fraternally, 
Frieda Greenfield, Past President, Publicity Chairman 



THECARPENTER 35 

WILLOWS LADIES WINDING UP ACTIVE YEAR 

The Editor: 

Hello to all our Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 537, \\'illo\vs, Calif. 

We are just a small group, not yet a year old, but we are planning for more members 
as time goes by. 

We meet the first and third Tuesday of each month, serving refreshments once each 
month. 

In September, we had a picnic; in No\'ember we lield a Thanksgiving dinner that was 
well attended by the carpenters, their wives and children. At Christmas, we had refresh- 
ments and an exchange of gifts. 

We have earned money from selling chances, holding white elephant auctions and 
grab bags. We plan now to make dish towels to be auctioned off and plan later on making 
a few quilts. 

We would like to hear from otlier sister Auxiliaries to exchange letters and ideas. 

Fraternall>\ 

Ina Cossins, Recording Secretary 



SAN JOSE AUXILL\RY COMPLETING 20TH YEAR 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 244 of San Jose, Calif. 

We are 42 in membership and in June we will celebrate our 21st Anniversary. 

On the second Tuesday of each month, we meet in the Labor Temple. Refreshments 
are sened after the business meeting. 

To increase our treasury, we have a card party once a month. All members who attend 
have a wonderful time. 

^^'e have an annual picnic, usually in July or August, and tliroughout tlie year, pot luck 
dinners and a dance. 

In September, 1949. we went to Santa Cruz and installed the officers of new Auxiliary 
No. 532. Brother Neilsen, President of Local No. 829, Santa Cruz, had already organized 
the group and had worked \-er>' hard getting it started so our work was easy. All of us 
who went to Santa Cruz \^"ill long remember the genial hospitality extended vs by Brother 
Neilsen and the Auxiliary. 

We enjoyed another such occasion recenth- when we went to Mountain View and 
helped another new AuxiUars', No. 554, get started. 

We read "The Carpenter" and enjoy it ver>' much as it helps us keep up to date on 
what otlier Auxiliaries are doing. 

Fraternally, 

Patricia M. Gale, Recording Secretar>' 
• 

TEX.\S CITY AUXILL\RY OFF TO GOOD START 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all from Auxiliary No. 558 of Texas City, Texas. 

We organized October 25, 1949. We have 28 members and we in\-ite all wnves, mothers, 
sisters and daughters of Carpenters' Local 973 to join us as members. 

The first Monday night of the month is our regular business meeting and tlie tliird 
Monday night is our social meeting. At tlie present time, we are meeting in the Carpenters' 
Hall. The men of Local 973 are planning in tlie near future to remodel tlie extra half of 
their building for oiu" meeting place which we appreciate ver>' much. 

Officers installed were: President, Mrs. G. L. Strong; \'ice-President, Mrs. E. R. 
Hardman; Recording Secretary-, Mrs. C. E. Hughes; Financial Secretar>-, Mrs. R. L. Scott; 
Conductor, Mrs. C. L. Crawford; Warden, Mrs. J. D. White; Trustees, Mrs. H. E. ^^'ood- 
house, Mrs. P. L. Bottoms and Mrs. L. L. Lanciiault; Reporter, Mrs. A. T. Ralm. 

^\'e want to say "Thanks" to Mrs. O. S. Howe of AuxiUary No. 413, Gaheston; Mrs. 
Joe \Mniams of Auxiliary- No. 8, Houston, and Miss Alma Lee Griffin of Auxiliarv' No. 511, 
Austin, for tlie wonderful help tliey have been to us in organizing tliis AuxiHan.'. 

We'd like to see this letter in "The Carpenter" and also hear from otlier Sister Aux- 
iliaries, 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. C. E. Hughes, Recording Secretary 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 258 
The Use of Diagram, Practical.— In fram- 
ing any irregular roof, the use of a diagram 
is recommended. Such a diagram should 
be drawn to some convenient scale. Per- 
haps the most practical scale is the one in 




Fig. 1 

these lessons, in which 1 inch on the square 
equals 1 foot in the diagram. But it should 
not be presumed that this is the only prac- 
tical scale that can be used. If the roof is 
rather large, then a smaller scale is more 
convenient, and for that reason more prac- 
tical. If the roof is small a conventient 
larger scale might prove to be more prac- 
tical than the one suggested here. 




Fig. 2 

Rule For Framing Hips, VaUeys, and 
Jacks.— If tlie use of the tangent is clearly 
understood, as it is used in roof framing, 



then any hip roof, regular, irregular plan, 
and irregular pitch, can be framed by the 



and „ , 

following rule: 

The diagonal distance of the two full 
rims that intersect at the hip or valley, is 




Fig. 3 

the run of the hip or valley, whichever it 
might be. The edge bevel of any hip, 
valley, or jack is obtained by taking the tan- 
gent on one arm of the square, and the 
rafter length on the other, the latter giving 
the bevel. The run and the rise of any 
rafter taken on the square, will give the 
level and plimib cuts. 




Fig. 4 

The VaUey Run.— Fig. 1 shows the square 
apphed to a diagram of a roof, which has 
tvvo irregular valleys, for obtaining the run 
of the valleys. Here the run of the main 
roof is 12 feet, and the run of the second- 
ary roof is 7 feet. The diagonal distance 
of these tvvo runs, as shown on the dia- 
gram, is the run of the valleys. 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



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ROOF FRAMING.— 175 p. and 437 il. Roof framing 
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CARPENTRY. — Has 302 p., 754 il.. covering general 
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Edge Bevels for Valley Rafters.— Fig. 2 

shows the square applied to the valley run 
for getting the points to be used on the 
square for marking the edge bevel that will 
fit the ridge of the secondary roof. The 
sides of the triangle, c-d, d-a, and a-c, rep- 
resent respectively, the run, the rise, and 
the rafter length of the valley, shown as 
if it were lying on the side. The dotted 
part-circle from a to b, shows how the rafter 
length has been transferred from c-a, to 
c-b. The tangent, as shown, is the right- 
angle distance from the toe of the valley 
rafter to the center of the secondary roof. 
Now the tangent and the rafter length, as 
shov/n, will give the edge bevel of the 




ri-i 



Fig. 5 

valley rafter that will fit the ridge of the 
secondar>' roof— the rafter length giving the 
bevel. 

The bevel to fit the ridge of the main 
roof is obtained as shown by the diagram 
in Fig. 3. Here the valley rafter is on the 
side, as shown in Fig. 2. The shaded bevel 



at point a, is the bevel for the plumb cut 
of the valley. The rafter lengtli has been 
transferred, as explained in the other dia- 
gram, and as shown here by the dotted 
part-circle, between a and b. To get the 
edge bevel, take the tangent and the rafter 
length on the square— the latter will gi\e 
the bevel. As seen, the square is not large 
enough to take the tangent and the rafter 
length, so these must be reduced. A good 
way to do tliis is shown by Fig. 4. Here 
the shaded square is pushed to the right 




Fig. 6 

on the tangent until 12 on the tongue comes 
to the point of the triangle, as shown. Then 
12 inches on the tongue represents the re- 
duced tangent, and the distance from the 
heel of the square to point X represents 
the rafter length. The same results can be 
obtained by pushing the square up on the 
valley run, as shown by the dotted-line 




Fig. 7 

square, until 12 on the tongue intersects 
the diagonal line, as shown. Then 12 on 
the tongue and point X on the blade will 
give the edge bevel— the blade giving the 
bevel. The rafter length and tlie tangent 
can also be reduced, as mentioned a num- 
ber of times in previous lessons, by di\'iding 
both distances by 2. 

Edge Bevels of a Valley.— Fig. 5 shows 
two applications of the square for marking 
the edge bevels for a valley rafter. Here 
die application numbered 2, is the same as 
the one found in Fig. 2, while tlie one 
numbered 4, is the same as eitlier of the 
two applications shown in Fig. 4. Study 
the three drawings. The part of tlie main 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



drawing, Fig. 5, marked A and B, are shown 
to the right in two parts, again marked A 
and B. At the bottom of A, the cut shows 
what it would be hke in case the rafter 
were a hip straddhng the corner of a deck, 
while the upper part of B shows the cut 
of a valley rafter that is to fit into an angle 
of tvvo ridges, as shown in Fig. 3. The dot- 




Fig. 8 

ted lines respectively indicate the comer 
of a deck and an angle of two ridges. 

Edge Bevels of Jacks.— Fig. 6 shows the 
square in position for obtaining the points 
to be used for marking the edge bevel of 
the valley Jacks of the main roof. Here the 




Fig. 9 



common rafter is shown as if it were on 
its side. The rafter length, c-a as shown 
by the dotted part-circle, has been trans- 
ferred to c-b. Now the tangent and the 
rafter length will give the edge bevel of 
the jacks. The application of the square 
to the rafter material is shown by Fig. 7 
—the blade giving the bevel. 



How to get the points for marking the 
edge bevel of the jack rafters of the second- 
ary roof is shown by Fig. 8. Here again, 
the rafter length, c-a is transferred to c-b, 
as indicated by the dotted part-circle. Now 
the tangent and the rafter length will give 
the edge bevel— the rafter length giving the 
bevel. Fig. 9 shows the square applied to 
the rafter material— the blade giving the 
bevel. 



WANTS TO KNOW 

By H. H. Siegele 

A reader wants to know how to lay win- 
dow plans, and also the roofs. 

The simplest bay window is the one called 




the octagon bay window— that is to say, the 
angles are the same as the angles of a true 
octagon. Fig. 1, at the top, shows a plan of 



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THE CARPENTER 



39 



an octagon bay window with 2x4 plates in 
place. The degrees of two angles are shown 
on the drawing. The butt joints are made 
on a 45-degree angle, or by using 12 and 




Fig. 2 

12 on the square. The miter joints are made 
by using 12 and 4.97. Sometimes 12 and 5 
is used, which is nearly enough correct for 
most practical purposes. The bottom draw- 
ing shows the roof plan, a sort of diagram. 
To the right is shown how to frame the 
jack rafters. Here a rafter is shown on the 
side, in which A-B is the rafter, B-C the 
run, and C-A the rise. The rafter length 
is transferred with compass from B-A to 
B-D, as shown by the dotted part-circle. 
Now the rafter length and the tangent taken 



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on the square, will give the edge bevel that 
fits against the side of the main building— 
the rafter giving the bevel. The run and 
the rise, of course, give the pluml^ and 
level cuts. 

Fig. 2 shows how to get the edge bevel 
for the hip rafter, which is shown on the 
side. Here B-C is the run, C-A the rise, and 
A-B the rafter. The rafter is again trans- 
ferred from B-A to B-D, as indicated by 
tlie dotted part-circle. Now the rafter length 
and the tangent gives the edge bevel-the 
rafter length gives the bevel. 




Fig. 3 

Fig. 3, top, shows a plan of a he.xagon bay 
window, with the 2x4 plates in place. The 
degrees of two angles are given on the 
drawing. To mark both the butt and the 
miter joints use 12 and 6.93. Sometimes 
12 and 7 is used for rough work. The bot- 
tom drawing shows a plan of the roof, which 
is framed on the same principle used for the 
octagon roof. Remember tliat in roof fram- 
ing problems it is necessary to do reading 
between the lines. 



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edges and easily read marks. Have 
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other EMPIRE Levels, or write for 
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HOW TO CUT RAFTERS 



(t*s new . . . NOW 

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ind 12 rise. Any one can frame a roof with this great 
look. Just open book to your pitch page and there in 
)lain print is your lengtlis cuts and deductions for any 
litched roof. Also gives how to figure elevations. How 
figure lumber. How to lay out window and door | 
ipenings. Written by Harry (Dad) Bleam and It's 
landy. Price only $2.00 each. 



STRINGER LAYOUTS. 



BOOK OF 
CENTURY: 



Its a simplified stair builders manual; Its a lay out book 
or carpenters that want a simple way to lay out stair car- 
-iages and stringers. Just plain talk with illustrations that 
I worker can understand. Xo trigonometry, obtuse angles or 
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CARPENTRY ESTIMATING 
f you are an apprentice estimator you will want this man- 
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lives costs in carpenter hours. Gives simple and easy to 
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well value, you will like this one if you want to learn, 
'rice $2.00 

STEP BY STEP HOUSE FRAMING DETAILS 

>tep by step house framing details is another of the 
'Dad Bleam manuals." It's crammed full of house fram- 
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Vrite 

I BUILDERS' TOPICS 

512 Market St. Seattle 7, Wa«h. 

lOTICE— ALL THE ABOVE FOUR MANUALS WILL 
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THE BEST CRAFTSMEN ALWAYS TAKE PAINE'S 



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CARPENTERS 
HANDBOOK 

consists of short but practical 
rules for laying out roofs, ceil- 
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with tables of board measure, 
length of common, hip, valley 
and jack rafters, square meas- 
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explaining the steel square. 
Money back if not satisfied 

$1.00 postpaid 

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5344 Clinton Ave. 
Minneapolis 9. Minn. 





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There are 2400 widths of build- 
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There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
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A hip roof is 48'-9i/4" wide. Pitch 
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Price $2.50 Postpaid. If C. O. D. pay <2.85. 

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.^. MFG. CORP. 

^^^^^/' NEW YORK 59. N.Y. 



JIAKE MONEY 

f^^ Sharpening Mowers 




"Paid For My Foley in 2i Weeks" 



"I have had my Foley Lawn Mower 
Sharpener about 2J weeks and have 
made back every cent I put into it — 
more too," writes Elmer W. Aldrlch. 
"Looks like it is going to be more than 
just a side line." You can build up a 
steady, repeat cash business at home, 
in your spare time. The Foley sharpens 
3 or 4 mowers an hour, (with handles 
on) and your profit is 99c on the dol- 
lar. Your investment is only $98.50 to 
$139.50 — easy payments if desired. 
FREE BOOK— "How to Sharpen Pow- 
er Mowers" shows just how to sharpen 
any make of power lawn mower with 
the Foley. Mail coupon todaj' — we'll 
a-lso send FREE PLAN telling how to 
start your own business without previ- 
ous experience. No salesman will call. 




Send 
Coupon Today 



FOLEY LAWN MOWER SHARPENER 



1 Foley Mfg. Co., 301-0 Foley BIdg., Minneapolis 18, Minn. 
I Send FREE BOOK "How to Sharpen Power Mowers," 
I and FREE PLAN on lawn mower business. 



u 



\AME 

ADDRESS 






Comes With 
Leatherette case 



^ HANG THAT DOOR 
THE PROFESSIONAL WAY! 



Makes a clean-cut, deeply-etched profile on door. 
BemoTe chips. Repeat operation on jamb. Hang 
door! No adjustments. No fussing. Precision made. 
Drop-forged, heat-treated steel. Comes in 3", 3i" 
and 4" (Std) sizes. 



ONLY $1.75 ea. — $3.50 a pair 
(any two) — $5.25 complete set 
of three. If dealer can't supply, 
send only $1.00 -with order and 
pay postman balance plus post- 
age C. O. D. In Canada, .25c 
higher per order. No C. O. D. 
State sizes wanted. 



E-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377 Dept. C, Los Angeles 16, Cil. 




USERS PRAISE 
HIGHLY 

"Really a help for the 
'old hands' and almost 
a 'must' for the new 
boys." 

S. H. Glover 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

"The greatest help In 

hanging doors I have 
ever seen." 

J. Allen Charles 

Mullins, S. C. 





or 
more 



ELIASON STAIR GAUGE 

1. Measures tread or riser 

(above) 

2. Marks board for perfect fit 
the first time (right) 

Dealers and Agents Wanfed 



ELIASON TOOL COMPAN 



SAVE A DAY 

on Every Staircase You Build 

ELIASON STAIR GAUGE in 10 seconds gives 
you both correct length and angle of stair 
treads, risers, closet shelves, etc.. ready to 
mark board. Each end piv- 
ots and locks at any length 
or angle. Adjustable from 
20" up. Saves a day or more, 
increases your profits $20 
or more on each staircase. 
Fully guaranteed. Only 
$12.95 cash ■with order, or 
C. O.D. plus postage. Order 
Today, or send for circular. 

2121 E. 56lh St., MINNEAPOLIS 17, MINN. 




^%*^ DANDEE REELS 

FOR ALL BUILDING TRADES 




OTHER 

PRODUaS 

\r 

\'. Plamb«rs' oad Tiuers' 
Foniaces...Grta Torcbes 
...Fsnra Torches,., lazor 
llode Scrapers 



No. 41 Reel and Plumb Bob. Use this new tool 
for a plumb line, mason line or chalk line. It 
has a spring bracket attached for the plumb bob 
when it is not in use. Anti-backlash, easy to 
add chalk. Nickle plated steel case and chrome 
plated bob contains 100 ft. of No. 18 yellow 
mason line. 



No. 44 Chalk Line Reel. 50 

ft. of line is always chalked 
when drawn from the reel. 
Made so that the Hne cannot 
snarl or tangle within the 
case. ChaBc lasts a year of 
ordinary use; can easily be 
reordered and reloaded. 




No. 44 



tl 



CEDARBERG MANUFACTURING CO., 561 So. 4th St.. Minneapolis 15. 

Enrlosed find $ for the following shipped pospaid: 

n No. 41 Beel (100 Ft.) @ $2.50 □ No. 44 Reel (50 Ft.) @ $1-00 

□ No. 43 Beel (100 Ft.) Similar to No. 44 @ $1.25 

Red, \\'hite. Blue and Dark Blue Chalk in 2 oz. ConUinere @ 15c. Color: 

Print Address : 




STAIR GAGES 

(Angle Gages) 

The handiest little devices you ever 
had in your tool box. Easily carried 
in the pocket. Used on square for 
laying out angle cuts on rafters, stair 
stringers, etc. H" hexagon brass 
with plated steel screw. Rust proof 
and will last a lifetime. Order today! 
VVt. 4 oz. pr. 
Money back if not satisfied 

$1.00 Postpaid 

WELLIVER & SONS 
P. O. Box 278C 
Roekford, Illinois 



SAVE TIME! SAVE MONEY! with 

TRIP-HAMMER 

Saw -Set 

FOOT TREADLE OPERATED 

• LIGHT WEIGHT 

• TOOL BOX SIZE 

• SETS UP EASILT 

• MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

Set saws faster. NO CRAMPED HANDS. 

Every tooth set uniformly. Handles 5 to 12 
point hand saws, 3" to 10" circular saws, Two man cross 
cut saws. 

Send Check, Money Order or Postal Note. 

ARDEE TOOL CO. r^c®; ^l^t station, ohio 




4/ieH^/Vz Lighter than A// 
tAluminum ^ ' — 




Unbreakable Frame of 
lExtruded Magnesium AlloyI 

j Here's the newest — most sensational level ever 
lesigned! The new Scharf Magnelite Level is 
ighter weight— it's made of Magnesiums-one of 
he toughest yet lightest metals in existence, 
t's a masterpiece of accuracy — absolutely true, 
traight and parallel. Has large hand-holda .... 
asier to handle. Beautifully designed^grace- 
uUy streamlined. Greatest level ever built! 



NEWEST TYPE VIAL UNITS ARE 
ADJUSTABLE AND REPLACEABLE 

Vials are cemented into die cast 
Magnesium holder— held absolute- 
ly rigid. Finest glass windows. 
Vial units attached 
with sere ws— easily 
loosened for adjustment 
or replacement. 

Get Your Scharf 
Mignelit* Level Today! 
If your dealer can't 
supply you, order from 
us direct, but you must 
send dealer's name and 
address. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

J. H. SCHARF MFG. CO. 

Dept. C-3, Omaha, Nebr. 




Check 


These Low 


Prices 


No. 


Size (Inches) 


Price 


3412-. 


-1x2x12" 


.$3.50 


0618*. 


.1x2x18" 


. 4.50 


,3624- 


-1x2x24" 


. 5.00 


2624- 


-15x21x24".- 


. 5.75 


2628- 


..Ijx2ii28".. 


- 6.75 


2630. 


..Ijx2ix30".- 


. 7.25 


2642, 


-Ijx2ix42".- 


. 9.25 


2648- 


..lJx2Sx48".. 


.10.00 


2072- 


..Iji28l72".. 


.16.50 


'Extruded Alumi 


num 




Frame Only 











FREE 

10-DAY TRIAL 




ENLARGE YOUR 

SKILL! ADVANCE! 

EARN HIGHER PAY! 

Every step of carpentry in and 
around a house is clearly explained and 
illustrated In this big, useful book. Shows 
you how to build forms for foundations, foot- 
ings, walls, steps, walks — How to build sills, gir- 
der supporting posts and girders — How to figure 
loads for house framing — How to lay out. cut and 
erect floor joists — How to lay sub-fiooring — How to 
frame outside and inside walls, allowing for open- 
ings — How to check the plumb of studs — How to 
brace and sheathe up outside walls — How to erect 
celling joists — How to frame around a chimney and 
stair well — How to lay out rafters for a gable roof, 
dormer roof, porch roof — How to sheathe gable ends 
and rafters — How to build cornices — How to lay 
shingles — How to build porches and bays — -How to 
apply siding — How to frame up inside walls — How 
to construct stairs- — How to place trim around 
windows and doors — How to fit and hang sasli — 
How to hang doors — How to make closets, shelving 
and built-in equipment — How to lay finished wood 
flooring, linoleum flooring — How to hang a set of 
garage doors — How to insulate. 

OVER 600 ILLUSTRATIONS 

SHOW YOU JUST WHAT TO DO 

AND HOW TO DO IT 

Detail drawings and large 
photographs show clearly how 
to do any house carpentry 
job. Full instructions guide 
you — step by step — from read- 
ing the plan to making the 
excavations, laying the foun- 
dations, erecting the skeleton, 
and putting on the exterior 
and interior finish. Here, in 
one remarkable volume. Is the 
practical know-liow that can 
help you enlarge your skill in 
performing house carpentry 
jobs of every desccription. 248 
big pages, size 8i x Hi, fully 
indexed for easy reference. 



SEND NO MONEY 

Examine 10 Days Free 

Don't send us a penny. 
Just mail coupon and 
get "HOUSE CAK- 
PENTKY" for 10 
days FKEE trial. If 
not delighted, send 
book back to us and 
owe nothing. If you 
keep It, entire cost is 
only $3.98, plus few 
cents postage. Fill in 
and mail coupon be- 
low for your free-trial 
copy, now. 



FREE TRIAL COUPON ,Sday 



Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corp. 

30 Church Street, Dept. CA-350 
NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 

Send me, for 10 DAYS' FREE TRIAL, "House car- 
pentry and Joinery." I will either return it in 10 days 
and owe nothing, or send only $3.98 (plus shipping 
charges) in full payment. 

SAVE! Send $3.98 with this coupon and we pay post- 
age. Same return and refund privilege. 



Name . 
Address 
City — . 



State I 



THE CARPENTER'S HANDY HELPER 



at 



^kaU tbe^i 



has dozens of uses on every job! 

For that ''FINISHED TOUCH" 
Plastic Wood can be used 
for filling: 

• Nail holes 

• Cracks due to wood 

shrinkage 

• Countersunk screws 

• Old screw holes 

• Loose dowel pins 

• Broken railings 

• Split, cracked or splintered 

wood in bowling alleys. 

HANDLES LIKE PUTTY... 
HARDENS INTO WOOD 

Keep a supply of PLASTIC WOOD SOL- 
VENT on hand to control the consistency 
of PLASTIC WOOD. SOLVENT is also 
used for cleaning hands and tools. 

• On sale at all Builders' Supplies, 

Hardware and Paint Stores 



BUY THE 1 lb. CAN 



Boyle-Midwoy tn€. 
32 Enil 40#> Sir««> 
N.w York 1 6. K. r 




NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reierre the 
right to reject all adTcrtislng matter which miy 
be. In their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space In "The Car- 
penter," Including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellahle, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publisheTs. 



Index of Advertisers 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

The American Floor Surfacing 

Machine Co., Toledo, Ohio 5 

Ardee Tool Co., Rocky River 

Sta., Ohio 45 

Arrow Fastener Co. Inc., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 48 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 4th Cover 

Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Calif. 41 
Carlson & Sullivan, Inc., Mon- 
rovia, Calif. 38 

Cedarburg Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 44 

Cummins Portable Tools, Chicago, 

111 

Deltec, Inc., Youngstown, Ohio__ 47 
Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 47 

Wilbert Dohmeyer, Crete, 111 43 

Eagle Rule Mfg. Corp., New York, 

N. Y. 43 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 44 

Empire Level Mfg. Co., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 39 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 44 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 43-48 

Greenlee Tool Co., Rockford, 

111. 3rd Cover 

Hendrix Tool Specialty, Kansas 

City, Mo. 38 

Heston & Anderson, Fairfield, 

Iowa 40 

TTie Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw^, 

Mich. 41 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 42 

Millers Falls Co., Greenfield, 

Mass. 42 

Paine Co., Chicago, 111. 41 

Rowlands Mfg. & Sales Co., Ft. 

Worth, Texas 39 

J. H. Scharf Mfg. Co., Omaha, 

Nebr. 45 

Skilsaw, Inc., Chicago, 111 1 

Speedcor Products, Portland, Ore. 48 
Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn. 3rd Cover 
Welliver & Sons, Rockford, 111. 45 

Carpentry Materials 

E. L. Bruce Co., Memphis, Tenn. 42 
Lomayne Chemical Co., Wood- 
stock, 111. 39 

Nicholas Wire & Aluminum Co., 

Davenport, Iowa 

Plastic Wood, New York, N. Y._ 46' 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 47 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Builders Topics, Seattle, Wash._ 41 
Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Calif 42 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 41 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans 37 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y 45 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo 43 




^ MULTI-PURPOSE 

TOOL 

for Carpenters 

Now you can do many ol 
those conunon. unwieldy jobs 
with new ease and speed. 
The unique new Nelson Poor 
Jack works either as a 
spreader or vise for posi- 
tive, speedy action in fit- 
ting doors and sosh, for 
setting stair stringers, 
drilling stair rails, etc. 
Lightweight and dur- 
able, fits your tool box. 
Try it and see il the 
Nelson Door Jack 
doesn't become one of 
your proudest, most 
serviceable posses- 
sions. Order direct 
today or write ior 
literature. Only 
$12.95. 

PATENT APPLItO POO. 



deltec inc. 

2303 ^outh ^ve. ••• Youngstown 2, Ohio 




QBIG BUILDING BOOKS 



jVy"A*\\ r-; vYH^^**^ Edition for 

''■'.V\i\ .^^'^ EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 

Learn to draw plans, estimate, be a live-wire builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 9 practical, pro- 
fusely illustrated books cover subjects that will help you 
to get more work and make more money. Masonry, con- 
crete forms, carpentry, steel square, roof framing, construc- 
tion, plumbing, heating, painting, decorating and many 
other subjects. More than 4000 pages — 2750 illustrations. 

BETTER JOBS -- BETTER PAY "^-t.®?!^^ 

A nationwide building boom is In full t D I T I O N 
swing and trained men are needed. These books are 
Big opportunities are always for MEN the moat up-to- 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- date and complete 
ply quick, easily understood training and we have ever pub- 
handy, permanent reference information lished on tbeit 
that helps solve building problems. many subjects. 
Coupon Brings Nine Big Books For Examination 

«IERICAN TECHNiCAT SOCIETY" Publishers" sine" 1898 

Dept. G-336 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 
You may ship me the Up-to-Date edition of your nine 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery charges 
only, and If fully satisfied in ten days, I will send you 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 is paid. I tm not obligated in anj 
way unless I keep the books. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home address. 



YOUR skill 
helped by 

msroK 





i 



skill 



Skilled Disston veterans put Disston Saws through scores of tests 

^5j/ Work faster and easier, save material, do 

It/ less sharpening, by using Disston Saws. They're 

made of Disston Steel with Disston Skill. That 

means strictly uniform hardness and temper, true 

taper grind, tooth edges that last longer — plus 

balance and flex that carpenters say is "just right.'* 

The economy that comes from quahty has made Disston 

the saw most carpenters use. 

:NRY disston & sons, inc., 304 Tacony, Philadelphia 35, Pa., U.S.A. 

In Canada, write: 2-20 Fraser Ave., Toronto 3, On!. 



SPBBVCOn TOOLS 



iVUC $AV€ YOU 
TIME AN9 MONeV 






SPEED SAW FILER 

Now file your own saws! Precision fil- 
ing easy without experience. Two sim- 
ple adjustments. Keeps any hand saw 
extra sharp and true cutting. Complete 
with file and ready to use $2.95 



DRILL GRINDER 
Makes old drills cut like new. 
Sharpens 3 '32" to I'i" drills with 
factory accuracy in 30 sees. No ex- 
perience necessary. Use with hand 
or power grinding wheels. $2.95 



SPEED HANDLE 
Holds files, ra2or blades, taps, drills, 
Allen wrenches, bits etc. Operates 
similar to drill chuck. Precision 
made. Handiest tool in tool box. $1 





SPEED GRIP PLANE 
Precision made, pocket sized plane 
as easy to grip as big one. S'A" 
X I'/i" face. Can't be beat for all 
around fitting and finishing. Blade 
guaranteed to hold edge. $1.95 



SPEED SAW CLAMP 
Grips full length of hand saws — 30 inches. 
Saves time. Attached or released from bench 
in 15 seconds. Lifetime construction. Holds 
entire saw true without vibration. J4.95 



CIRCULAR SAW FILER 

Sharpen circular saws like an 
expert. Adjustable for any pitch 
or angle. Complete with file and I 
mandrels for blades with '/j", [ 
%", %". 13/16" centers. »6.95 



Order Today' Cash with order, prepaid. COD postage extra. Money back Guaraote* 



SPEEDCOR PRODUCTS "^^^T^^'- 



INDEPENDENCE 
AfTfR40A 



This FREE BOOK shows 
How to Win It 

"INDEPENDENCE AFTER 40" is a 

book giving you a proven, prac- 
tical way to make S20 to S30 a 
•week in spare time — .sharpening 
saws with the Foley Automatic 
Saw Filer. Start at home in 
basement or garage- — you can 
turn out perfect cutting saw» 
right away — no experience 
needed. 

The Free Book gives you a 
plan based on facts, with 
only a small investment, no 
overhead, no stock of goods 
to carry. There are thou- 
sands of saws in 
every community 
to keep sharp. 
Begin in spare time — 
develop into a full- 
time buEine.?s of your own later 
Take the first step towards being 
own boss — send the coupon for 
book — no salesman will call. 



S%^^'^. 





Send (?cu/iuuc 7(w FREE BOOK 



FOLEY MFG. CO., 31>-0 Foley BIdg., Minaeapolis 18, Minn. 
Send FREE BOOK— "Independence After 40"' 

Name 

Address 



STAPLE— to save time- 
speed up production 




T-32 Gun Tacker 

A many purpose tool replacing hammer and tacks 
at trigger rate speed. Shoots a staple wherever a 
tack can be driven. Ideal for Carpenters, Display- 
men, Insulators, Upholsterers, etc. Special screen and 
window shade attachments. Same machine takes o 
3/16", V4" and 5/16" staple. Loads 150 staples. 
S8.50. Rustproof "Monel" staples available. 

P-22 Hand Stapler 

"Reaches into hard-to- 
get-at places." Ideal 
For tagging, labeling, 
wrappings, sealing 
bags, containers and 
boxes. Same machine 
takes Va" and 5 16" 
S6.00. 

Slightly higher in the West and Canada. 
Buy from your /ocaJ Dealer or order dirett—Dept. C 




staples, toads 150 staples. 



ARROW FASTENER COMPANY, INC. 

30-38 Maufer St., Bklyn. 6, New York 



I 



Lgf the ri<il>f 'feed 
I") for fine work 



-• ALL THE BEST IDEAS of skilled Workers in 
wood for over 70 years have been built into 
these Stanley Planes. Naturally they feel 
right and work right. Stanley Tools, 163 Elm 
Street, New Britain, Connecticut 



THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 

[STANLEY] 

Reg. U.S. Pat. OfF. 
HARDWARE ■ TOOLS - ELECTRIC TOOLS 
STEEL STRAPPING -STEEL 



^^'~''^ff^M„ 




Plane 




If you like 
fine tools 

. . . then you'll certainly like to work 
with the new GREENLEE Socket Chisels. 
Perfectly balanced . . . handsome, 
transparent green plastic handles . . . 
fine bevel-edged GREENLEE blades, so 
long the choice of true craftsmen. Ask 
your hardware dealer about them. 





GREENLEE 



SPECIAL OFFER . . . WOODWORKING 

CALCULATOR...104. Quick solutions to 
countless problems... converting linear 
to board feet, nail and bit sizes, etc Send 10c to 
Greenlee Tool Co., 2083 Columbia Ave.. Rockford. Ill 



AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vois.*6 

InsideTrade Information 

for Carpenters, Builders, Join- 
ers, Building Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Guides 
give you the short-cut instruc- 
tions that you want— inciudinar 
Dew methods, ideas, solutions, 
plans, systems and money sav- 
ing suggestions. An easy pro- 
gressive course for the appren- 
tice and student. A practical 
daily helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpentera everywhere are us- 
ing these Guides as a Helping 
Hand to Easier Work, Better 
Work and Better Pay. To get 
this assistance for yourself, 
_ Bimply fill inand 

Inside Trade Information On: mail peek coupon beiow. 

How to iise the steel square — ^How to file and 

set saws — How to build furniture — How to use 

a mitre box — How to use tlie chalk line — How 

to use rules and scales — How to make joints — 

Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength of timbers — ■ 

How to set girders and sills — How to frame 

houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — How 

to build houses, barns, garages, bungalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

specifications — How to excavate — How to use 

settings 12 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to build hoists and scaffolds — skyUghts — How 

to build stairs — How to put on Interior trim — . 

How to hang doors — How to lath — lay floors — How to paint. 





AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., °".^ ^^\f' JilT? 
trial. If OK I will remit $1 In 7 days and $1 monthly until $6 is paid. 
—Otherwise I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisned. 



Occupation- 



Employed by- 



CAR 





ATKINS 

makes 



SAWS 



When it comes to sows, a carpen- 
ter owes himself the best! So it's 
important to remember when 
selecting saws— for any purpose., 
that "Silver Sfeel" Sows — devel- 
oped, perfected and manufactured 
only by Atkins— are made of the 
finest, toughest, longest-lasting 
steel ever alloyed for sawing 
operations. They ore backed by 
93 years of continuous research 
and scientific advancement! Tell 
your hardware dealer you wont 
Atkins "Silver Steel" Saws. 




E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY 

402 South Illinois StrMt 
Indlonopolit 9, Indiana 



.OF Alt flNE SAWS-THE FINEST ARE 'SILVER STEEL" SAWS 




fHE 




MPENTER 



FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of ttie 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 

APRIL, 1950 







REGISIERED 




IF NOT, 

WHY NOT? 



f« 



SAVE SANDING TIME WITH 




MANY USES 

From Roughing 
to Final Finish on 

ir WOOD 

i ^ METAL 

* * MARBLE 

ic STONE 

if COMPOSITION 
BOARD 



This American Portable BeJt Sander will save 
time and eliminate tedious hand sanding and plan- 
ing for you on many jobs! Use this easy-handling 
Belt Sander in your shop — and on location — for 
touch up sanding, roughing or final finish ... on 
wood, metal, marble, composition board or 
stone. Two models — with and without dust 
collector bag. Speedy . . . rugged . . . well-bal- 
anced . . . efficient, American-built dependability. 
Send coupon for free details. 



MAKE BIG MONEY 



SANDING FLOORS 




• Be a floor surfacing 
contractor and sand 
both new and old 
floors. Sanders are 
easy to operate and 
better still, you are 
your own boss. Write 
for latest "tell-all" 
booklet entitled 
'Opportunities in 
Floor Surfacing", 
enclosing 25 
cents in coin or 
stamps to cover 
handling. 



A 



ERICAN 

PORTABLE SANDERS 



Send Coupon Today 



THE AMERICAN FLOOR SURFACING MACHINE CO. 
520 So. St. Clair St., Toledo 3, Ohio 

Please send descriptive literature and prices 
on American Belt Sander — no obligation. 

Name 

Street 

City 



.State. 



Jt% 



imeriea^s Top Building Team... 

You and 

Celotex! 

'he unsurpassed "know-how" of expert all the advantages of those manufactured 
inion carpenters like you. Plus the top- by Celotex. For no others are made of 
uality building materials made by Celo- long, remarkably strong Louisiana cane 
ex, Greatest Name In Insulation. There's fibres. And no others are protected by the 
. team that can't be beat — a combination exclusive Ferox* Process against dry rot, 
hat adds up to buildings of enduring qual- fungus and termites. That's ^vhy it pays to 
ty, beauty and serviceability ! build with genuine Celotex Building Prod- 
No other insulation products give you nets — always! 

You build or remodel better with 
lenuine CELOTEX BUILDING PRODUCTS 

J. Celotex Double -Waterproofed Insulating Sheathing takes the place 
of ordinary sheathing, and forms the protective layer between framing and wall 
exterior. Provides necessary insulation, structural strength and moisture-proofed 
sheathing— at one low cost! Quicker, easier to apply tlian ordinary sheathing. 

^ Celotex Insulating Lath forms a rigid inside wall of insulation, providing ,; 

a strong, solid, continuous plaster base that reduces danger of plaster cracking. I 

Easy to handle and apply. t 

O Celotex Building Board lets you build attractive walls, ceilings and parti- | 

tions quickly and at low cost. Comes in big, rigid, lightweight sheets that are ^ 

easy to apply. Readily sawed, cut, grooved or beveled. <i| 

4 Celotex Insulating Interior Finishes for fast, thrifty remodeling or ""? 

building. Build, insulate and decorate, all at one low cost. Produce walls and 5 

ceilings of unusual beauty. Variety of exclusive new blends and textures in Tile i^ 

Board, Building Board and Finish Plank. ^ 

^ ^^ 

O Celo-Rok* Gypsum Wallboards build strong, economical walls, ceilings ^ 

and partitions. Quickly applied directly to framing. Take paint or wallpaper ^ 

beautifully. 1 



REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 



Build With Genuine ^^EILOTTE^C Building Products 

THE CELOTEX CORPORATION • CHICAGO 3, ILLINOIS 




Trade Mark Reg- March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXX— No. 4 



INDIANAPOLIS, APRIL, 1950 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



Contents — 



The Weak Get Kicked 7 

Using the excuse that organized labor is a "monopoly" the anti-labor forces in Con- 
gress are pushing two bills, either of which would cripple unions so effectively that their 
usefulness would be all but eliminated. In the meantime actual business monopolies 
which restrict competition, Inflate prices and limit production go merrily on their way 
unhampered by the anti-trust laws which were passed for the express purpose of stop' 
ping such practices. 



Gompers' Birthday Celebrated 



10 

The General Executive Board, in conjunction with representatives from nearly all 
local -unions in Florida, pays tribute to the memory of labor's Great Statesman whose 
influence still permeates much of the social and political thinking of American Labor. 



Everybody Benefits 



13 

A survey by the AFL statistical department shows that in ten industries surveyed, 
union workers get from twenty to thirty per cent higher wages than non-union workers 
in the same industry. Despite these higher wages, union plants are more than able to 
compete with non-union plants because of the superiority of union labor. 



Convention Call 



15 



Pursuant to the General Laws of the United Brotherhood the call for the Twenty-sixth 
General Convention has been issued in the established manner. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
The Locker 
Official 
Editorials 
In Memoriam 
Correspondence 
To The Ladies 
Craft Problems 



16 
18 
19 
24 
32 
34 
38 
39 



Index to Advertisers 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 191S. 



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The Weak Get Kicked 

* * 

As AN AFTERMATH of anti-union hysteria which the press and radio 
managed to work up during the recent coal strike, the anti-labor 
forces in Congress are stepping up their efiForts to put o\ er new legis- 
lation aimed at crippling the economic power of labor unions. Two such bills 
are now before Congress. They are: R. R. 6681, introduced in the House by 
P. Frank Wilson, Texas Democrat; and S. 2912, introduced in the Senate by 
Senator Robertson, Virginia Democrat, ^^'hat these bills propose to do is to make 
unions subject to the anti-trust laws by nullifying the protections set up by the 
Clayton Act and the Norris-LaGuardia Act, If either of them becomes law, 
the effectiveness of organized labor will be greatly curtailed and all unions 
will be laid open to continual barrages of injunctions, lawsuits and attacks. 
Behind all the legalistic verbiage in the bills, there is one single purpose; 
namely, to whittle down the size of unions and to cut down their effectiveness 
by keeping them broken up into isolated units insofar as collectixe bargaining 
is concerned. 



There is nothing new to the idea 
that labor unions are "monopolies" 
and as such should be subjected to 
anti-labor laws. Ever since the anti- 
trust laws came into existence foes of 
organized labor have endeavored to 
put over that philosophy. The Clay- 
ton Act and the Norris-LaGuardia Act 
became necessary because there was 
so much employer pressure for mak- 
ing unions subject to the anti-trust 
laws. However, it was some ten years 
ago that the unions really climbed 
onto solid ground insofar as the "mon- 
opoly" theory is concerned. And it 
was General President William L. 
Hutcheson and the United Brother- 
hood that put them there. 

I Ten years ago, Thurman Arnold, 
then Assistant Attorney General, at- 
tempted to use the anti-trust laws 
against organized labor. He singled 
out the United Brotherhood for spe- 
cial action. In the now famous St. 
Louis case, Arnold charged the United 
Brotherhood and General President 



Hutcheson with violating anti-trust 
laws. It was a delicate situation. 
President Hutcheson stood to receive 
a long jail sentence if Thurman Arnold 
pre\'ailed in his case. However, with- 
out hesitation, he deteraiined to carry 
the fight to the bitter end. The case 
was fought through the lower courts 
and up to the United States Supreme 
Court. It was a complete \'ictory for 
President Hutcheson and organized 
labor. The Supreme Court upheld the 
doctrine that labor is not a commodity 
in trade. It further knocked most of 
Mr. Arnold's theories about union 
monopoly into a cocked hat. The case 
has been known ever since as the 
"Hutcheson Case" and it has been the 
keystone of union liberty since tliat 
time. Passage of the Taft-Hartley 
Law made some inroads on the basic 
union rights established by the Hutch- 
eson Case, but to date labor unions 
are still outside the scope of anti- 
tmst laws. That is why the anti-labor 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



forces in Congress are now working 
on the Robertson Bill so diligently. 

Millions of words have been writ- 
ten about monopoly in organized la- 
bor. Yet, is there such a thing? On 
the face of it the answer is pretty 
obvious; no. There are some sixty 
million people in the working force 
in the United States. About one- 
fourth of this number belongs to labor 
unions. Can one-quarter of the peo- 
ple in any segment of our society 
constitute a monopoly? In a recent 
article in "The Nation," Sid Lens de- 
velops some interesting points on this 
question. In part, he points out: 

"Monopoly" may derive from ex- 
clusive control over the sale of com- 
modities, or over production facili- 
ties, or over the labor supply. In early 
days in America every farmer had 
control over all three— the labor sup- 
plied by Negro slaves or indentured 
white servants, the tools and the land, 
and the disposal of the crop. Artisans 
also in that period usually worked 
for themselves, with their own tools, 
and owned and sold the finished prod- 
uct. But as time went on and as the 
demand for shoes, textiles, iron prod- 
ucts "■ increased, the artisan set up a 
small manufactory and employed a 
handful of journeymen. No longer 
able to do all the work himself, he 
maintained his monopoly over the 
finished product and the facilities of 
production but relinquished his mo- 
nopoly over the labor supply. 

This loss was not too serious, be- 
cause each journeyman confronted 
the employer with his demands and 
grievances as an individual. The em- 
ployer could say, "If you don't like it, 
quit," and if he lost but one man his 
production was only slightly impair- 
ed. It was only when the one man 
was joined by his brother journeymen 
and all together answered the em- 
ployer's ultimatum with, "If you don't 



grant our demands you lose your la- 
bor supply and must shut down." that 
a labor monopoly was counterposed 
to the two monopolies enjoyed by 
the employer. 

Our society is thus based on mo- 
nopoly—exclusive control. Both em- 
ployer's and unions have monopolies 
in their own fields. As the United 
States grew from a mercantile nation 
to an industrial one and finally to a 
"monopolistic" one, the area of "ex- 
clusive control" grew. Small employ- 
ers merged, or were swallowed up by 
giants, or, in depression times, by 
banks. We have now reached the 
state of affairs where one-eight of one 
per cent of the corporations control 
51 per cent of all corporate wealth. 
In thirteen industries two or three 
companies, sometimes one, dominate 
the whole market. Almost half of 
America's capital assets is controlled 
by 113 corporations. 

This growth of industrial monopoly 
has its counterpart in labor. From 
small, local, isolated unions, labor has 
moved to city federations of labor, 
state federations of labor, the alliance 
of workers of a similiar craft or in- 
dustry in a number of cities into a na- 
tional craft or industrial union, and 
finally the federation of national un- 
ions in the American Federation of 
Labor and later the Congress of In- . 
dustrial Organizations. The question, ji 
then. Are labor unions monopolies?] 
makes just as little sense as the ques- j 
tion. Is the Aluminum Corporation of -j 
America a monopoly? Both are. A 
labor union attempts, in the words 
of Thurman Arnold, "to monopolize 
the labor supply" in its field, and 
Alcoa dominates the production fa- 
cilities and the sale of finished prod- 
ucts in the aluminum field. 

The real point at issue is not 
whether they are monopolies but 



THE CARPENTER 



whether they are harmful to the gen- 
eral welfare. Industrial monopolies 
that combine in restraint of trade, 
that boost prices, that keep back new 
production facilities, that withhold 
better products from the market, that 
set up predatory world cartels to ex- 
ploit colonial peoples— these are 
harmful monopolies. But the mo- 
nopoly that a labor union attempts 
to establish is by and large a benefi- 
cial one. It tries to raise wages, in- 
crease purchasing power, achieve 
some security for the majority of the 
people. Properly speaking it is a 
counter-monopoly, a defensive weap- 
on against more powerful monopo- 
lies. And as counter-monopolies un- 
ions are still a long way from being 
able to match their strength with the 
monopolies they face. 

Ever since enactment of the Sher- 
man law against industrial monopo- 
hes reactionary interests have at- 
tempted to turn the picture upside 
down. They have presented a bogy- 
man of "labor monopolies" to distract 
attention from their own anti-social 
monopolies. The essence of the Taft- 
Hartley law is that it attempts to 
break up a socially beneficial mono- 
poly in order to aid restrictive busi- 
ness monopolies. Under it unions are 



not permitted to engage in a second- 
ary boycott. If a union is on strike at 
one plant and the employer farms out 
his work to another factory owned by 
someone else, it is illegal to put a 
picket line around the second factory. 
It is perfectly legal, however, for the 
employer to farm out struck work. A 
union, under Taft-Hartley, is not per- 
mitted to tell its members to respect 
the picket line around another em- 
ployer. Members of a union on strike 
lose their job rights if the employer 
can replace them. If a Labor Board 
election is held, the strikers don't 
vote, the strike-breakers do. Senator 
Taft has singled out the weaker of the 
tsvo monopolies for further weaken- 
ing; that is the essence of his law. 

The nation as a whole, however, 
faces a choice. Shall it permit the 
labor unions to grow as a check to 
the restrictive practices of industrial 
monopoly, or shall it weaken the un- 
ions so that big business can continue 
unimpeded to hamper the develop- 
ment of our productive facilities. The 
question is which monopolies to aid 
and which to weaken. Every progres- 
sive, mindful of the experiences of 
Germany and other countries, will 
cast his ballot for the monopoly which 
is attempting to reach an equitable 
solution for our social ills. 



DON'T MISS THE 5th AFL UNION INDUSTRIES SHOW 
You'll get a big lack out of it! 

It is the only one of its kind and is scheduled May 6-13 at Convention Hall in Phila- 
delphia. We want to make it the biggest and best ever held. In order that it wU be the 
sensational success that every other one has been, we appeal to all national and inter- 
national unions of the American Federation of Labor to participate in this unique labor- 
management exhibition. 

Good relations— cooperation between labor and management— is one of the worthy goals 
of our Union Industries Show. PubHc good will of American consumers is another objective. 
We anticipate that half a million people will see this spectacular AFL-union event. Admis- 
sion is free and valuable prizes will be given away. 

Over one and a half rurming miles of briUiant displays of high-quahty, union-made 
products and exciting demonstrations of efficient union services— marvels of union workers 
techniques— will be seen in the huge auditoriums of famous Convention Hall. 

Visitors v^^ll also get a big kick out of the music, the contests, the entertainment and 
U.S. armed forces' displays in addition to the gorgeous exhibits during the 8-day, action- 
packed, round-up of union-made-in-America merchandise and union ser\ices. 



10 



GOMPERS' BIRTHDAY CELEBRATED 



• • 

THE GENERAL Executive Board, in conjunction with the oiBBcers and 
representatives of the Florida State Council of Carpenters, the Busi- 
ness Agents of the entire State and many visiting Brothers, held a joint 
celebration of the 100th anniversary of the birthday of Sam Gompers, who 
for nearly half a century was President of the American Federation of Labor. 
The afiFair was held at the New Florida Hotel, Lakeland, Florida on Saturday, 
February 25th. 

General President Hutcheson, who is also First Vice-President of the A. 
F. of L., was Master of Ceremonies. He said: 

"We are holding this celebration for 



the express purpose of honoring the 
100th anni\'ersary of the Birthday of 
Sam Gompers, the old labor leader 
who in his day devoted his time, en- 
ergy and ability to the advancement 
and development of the Labor Move- 
ment the world over, and is therefore 
entitled to all the recognition, credit 
and honor we can bestow upon him. 
We have with us an old time member 
who knew him well and worked with 
him for many years, our General Sec- 
retary Emeritus, Brother Frank Duffy. 
I know he can tell us much about the 
early days of the Labor Movement 
and Sam Gompers." 

Brother Duffy said in part: 
"Sixty-one years ago I joined a Car- 
penters Union in New York City- 
Lodge No. 2 of the United Order of 
American Carpenters and Joiners— the 
organization that preceded the Bro- 
therhood. I knew Sam Gompers, P. 
J. McGuire, Gabe Edmonston, Ter- 
ence V. Powderley and other leaders 
in the movement. So I know where 
of I speak. Going back to the early 
days of the movement and speaking 
of Sam Gompers is like repeating an- 
cient history. Perhaps you don't want 
ancient history. A labor conference 



held in Terre Haute, Indiana on Au- 
gust 2, 1881, was really the beginning 
of the Federation. A call drafted by 
P. J. McGuire and signed by other 
International OflBcers was sent out 
to hold a Convention in Pittsburgh, 
Pa., on November 15, 1881 for the 
purpose of forming a National Con- 
gress of Labor or Federation of La- 
bor. One hundred and seventeen (117) 
delegates were present from all Labor 
Organizations including the Knights 
of Labor. Sam Gompers was there 
from the Cigar Makers and was 
Chairman of the Committee on Con- 
stitution and Law. An organization 
was formed under the title 'The Fed- 
eration of the Organized Trades and 
Labor Unions of the United States 
and Canada.' I will give you in chro- 
nological order as near as I can the 
principal events that followed. 

"The Knights of Labor were barred 
from representation in the future, as 
they had their own organization. 
Yearly Conventions were held, but 
the representation dwindled until 
1886 when only 19 Delegates were 
present at the Convention held in 
Columbus, Ohio. P. J. McGuire im- 
mediately got busy and reorganized 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



the Federation of the Organized 
Trades and Labor Unions of the Unit- 
ed States and Canada into The Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. Sam Gom- 
pers was elected President. P. J. Mc- 
Guire, although he declined, was 
elected Secretary and Gabe Edmons- 
ton, the First General President of the 
Brotherhood of Carpenters, was elect- 
ed Treasurer. It then began to grow, 
de\elop and expand. 

"In 1890 the American Federation 
of Labor selected the Brotherhood 
of Cai-penters to move for the eight 
hour day. They won. Sam Gompers 
was their great supporter and backer, 
always an advocate of the shorter 
work day. 

"In 1895, Sam Gompers and Pete 
McGuire were elected the first Dele- 
gates to the British Trades Union 
Congress from the American Feder- 
ation of Labor. 

"In 1898 the A. F. of L. held its 
annual Convention in Kansas City, 
Missouri. The question of "Partisan 
Politics" was the big subject under 
discussion. P. J. McGuire made one 
of his best talks and wound up by 
saying, 

'Vote for your friends and defeat 
your enemies.' 

"Sam Gompers accepted it and it 
became the slogan of the A. F. of L., 
then and is now. 

"The Socialists took advantage of it, 
claiming they were the friends of 
labor and in the Conventions of the 
A. F. of L. in 1899, 1900, 1901, and 
1902, introduced Resolutions claim- 
ing the labor vote. In fact they want- 
ed to capture the A. F. of L. but all 
these Resolutions were non-concurred 
in. At the 1903 Convention in Old 
Fanieul Hall, Boston, the Cradle of 
Liberty, the Socialists introduced ten 
Resolutions on all sorts of subjects. 
The Resolution Committee dealt with 
them all at one time and reported 



"Non-concurrence." Then the big 
fight started and lasted nearly two 
days. The Socialists used all the tac- 
tics at their command. When the de- 
bate finally closed Gompers claimed 
the right to reply and especially so to 
accusations made against him and it 
was willingly granted. With flashing 
eyes and clear voice he went after the 
Socialists without mercy. At that time 
he was fifty-three and in his prime. 
Pointing his finger at the leaders of 
the Socialists he said: 

T want to tell you, Socialists, 
that I have studied your philoso- 
phy; read your works upon eco- 
nomics, and noted the meanest of 
them; studied your standard 
works, both in English and Ger- 
man—have not only read, but 
studied them. I ha\'e heard your 
orators and watched the work of 
your movement the \^'orld over. 
I have kept close watch upon 
your doctrines for thirty years; 
have been closely associated with 
many of you, and know how you 
think and what you propose. I 
know, too, what you have up 
your sleeve. And I want to say 
that I am entirely at \ ariance 
with your philosophy. I declare 
it to you, I am not only at vari- 
ance with your doctrines, but 
with your philosophy. Econom- 
ically, you are unsound; socially, 
you are wrong; industrially, you 
are an impossibility.' 

"I think that was the best statement 
he ever made and it should be pub- 
lished from one end of the land to the 
other. He was a great man, a great 
organizer, a good orator, a great 
leader and a great President of the 
A. F. of L. He was consulted by Con- 
gressmen and Presidents on matters 
aflFecting labor. He was Labor's States- 
man, Labor's Spokesman. The A. F. 
of L. has grown, expanded and de- 



12 THE CARPENTER 

veloped. It has eight miUion members ti\e. enHghtening and educational ad- 

now with milhons of dollars in its dress on matters with which the 

treasiir}-. We know the A. F. of L. Labor Movement has to contend with 

General President Hutcheson has been today. 

a Delegate to its Conventions for 35 General President Hutcheson then 
years and I have been a Delegate for called on each member of the Gen- 
47 years, so we know whereof we eral Executi\'e Board and the re- 
speak. Am glad to be with you at this spouses were fine and fitting to the 
celebration." occasion. 

When First General \'ice-Presi- Everybody admitted it was the best 

dent Maurice Hutcheson was called celebration ever held in the State of 

upon he referred to the cause of the Florida and one to be long remem- 

celebration and gave a ver\' instruc- bered. 



Sixteen Reasons Why T-H Must be Repealed 

Milhons of words have been \\Titten on the subject 'WTiat's \\Tong "\"\'ith 
The Taft-Hartley Act?" Most of the articles are clear and hard-hitting; the 
only trouble is they contain too many words. Recently Secretary' of Labor 
Tobin boiled dowm to sixteen short paragraphs the things that are \\Tong with 
the law. For those who want ammunition for pressing for repeal of the law, 
Tobin's sixteen objections are handy. They are: 

1. The Act's banning of union secmrity agreements mutually beneficial to 
both labor and management for a period of over 100 years. 

2. The special emphasis placed by the Act on the use of injunctions to 
settle labor disputes. 

3. The Act's removal of the Conciliation Service from the Department of 
Labor. 

4. The broad discretionary power placed by the Act in the General Coun- 
sel of the National Labor Relations Board, making him \'irtually "a labor czar." 

5. The Act's provisions for numerous elections which keep employer-em- 
ploye relations in a constantly unsettled condition. 

6. The Act's outlawing of jDeaceful picketing in many situations. 

7. The Act's restrictions on the check-off. 

8. The Act's denial of the right to vote to economic strikers. 

9. The Act's pro\ision for employers' petitions for union representation 
elections. 

10. The Act's restrictions on health and welfare funds. 

11. The Act's surrender of Federal jurisdiction where state laws are more 
restrictive on imion securit}'. 

12. The Act's broad ban on political contributions and expenditures by 
labor organizations. 

13. The Act's provision for damage suits against unions. 

14. The Act's indiscriminate outlawing of all secondary boycotts, whether 
justifiable or not. 

15. The Act's provision for mandator}' injunctions against certain union 
unfair labor practices. 

16. The Act's elaborate and inflexible procedures including an SO-da)' wait- 
ing period enforced by injuction in emergency disputes, combined \^dth pro- 
hibition against recommendations by boards of inquiry to assist parties to settle 
such disputes. 



13 



Everybody Benefits 



THE LEADERSHIP of Samuel Gompers and the everlasting hard work 
of AFL unions in raising the nation's wage levels have helped to 
create the American prosperity which is the wonder of the world in 
this tvventieth century. 

That's the story told in the current issue of the AFL Labor Monthly Survey. 

The Survey published charts showing that in 10 industries alone, AFL 

unions have raised wages 20 to 30 per cent higher than nonunion wages and 

that these rising wages increased the — 



average purchasing power of every 
American. 

"Yet the union plants are prosper- 
ing, well able to compete with non- 
union concerns because of their supe- 
rior labor force and efficiency," the 
Survey said. "This far-sighted policy 
on the part of labor has been basic in 
American progress. 



der, Samuel Gompers, as we celebrate 
the lOOtli anniversary of his birth. 

Gompers and his fellow workers de- 
veloped unions which enable workers 
to better themselves by sharing in the 
benefits of free enterprise. No other 
way promises workers as great ad- 
vancement, for economic progress 
springs from individual initiative and 



UNION WAGES ARE HIGHER 

for every (^^ <» o non-union pay envelope in these Industries^ 

the union pay envelope contains: 




'''"^'nMTim r^'^^'T'^^'''^^^^^^^ '''' 



WAfmusiNd 



"High wages in union plants have 
forced nonunion employers to raise 
pay. Rising buying power has in- 
, creased demand, raising production 
and creating more jobs and more de- 
mand, while expanding production re- 
duced unit costs." 

Here's the story from Labor's 
Monthly Survey: 

Significantly, we are re-examining 
this year the principles of our foun- 

i 



voluntary action when men can bene- 
fit from the results of their work. 

Gompers' union activity began in 
New York City in the early 1870's. 
Wages then were 1 to 15 cents an 
hour for a work week of more than 60 
hours. Unions were weak and often 
misled by impractical theorists; union 
organizers were marked men, black- 
listed, their families ostracized. Gom- 
pers and his fellow cigarmakers set 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



out to make their local union a strong, 
practical and effective organization to 
deal with the employer and handle 
members' work problems. They dis- 
cussed socialism, and other forms of 
government intervention— theories 
then popular in Europe— and cast 
them aside. They set up their union 
as a shop organization, with separate 
officers in each shop to handle mem- 
bers' business; collective bargaining 
with the employer was their method 
for winning better wages, hours and 
conditions. The union was opened to 
all workers in the industry; and an 
employment bureau run by the union 
helped members find jobs. 

This new "business unionism" be- 
gan to show results. "We fought for 
each gain," he says, "and with bare 
hands unaided carried off victories 
against the protest of a hostile world." 
In those days the movement was very 
poor— but they forged ahead. Other 
unions studied their methods. "Busi- 
ness unionism" spread throughout 
New York state, the Cigarmakers In- 
ternational Union, elsewhere. Union 
discipline developed. Wildcat strikes 
were outlawed; grievance committees 
assured workers justice on the job and 
eliminated causes of strikes; signed 
contracts made joint agreements bind- 
ing. 

These early unionists saw in their 
drive for higher wages a lifting force 
that could better the whole human 
family. Through their unions they 
won higher wages, then participated 
in measures to reduce costs and get 
out the production necessary to pay 
for the wage increase. Our founder's 
policy was not to oppose the introduc- 
tion of labor-saving machinery, but to 
see that union members were em- 
ployed to operate it and that workers 
benefitted by the saving in costs. The 
union wages chart shows 10 industries 
where today union wages are from 20 



to 30 per cent higher than non-union 
wages. Yet the union plants are pros- 
pering, well able to compete with 
non-union concerns because of their 
superior labor force and efficiency. 

This far-sighted policy on the part 
of labor has been basic in American 
progress. High wages in union plants 
have forced non-union employers to 
raise pay. Rising buying power has 
increased demand, raising production 
and creating more jobs and more de- 
mand, while expanding production re- 
duced unit costs. It was Gompers' 
policy to demand the obtainable now, 
and tomorrow, more now, more then, 
and these gains built up union 
strength so that unions became stable 
agencies. He started unions along 
the road to steadily growing possibili- 
ties. So while the genius of American 
management brought new production 
miracles, AFL unions translated pro- 
duction into higher living standards, 
and workers' larger pay envelopes 
created an expanding market to ab- 
sorb the flood of new goods turned 
out. The purchasing source chart 
shows that the per capita buying 
power of the American people (that 
is, the general living standard) almost 
doubled in the 29 years from 1900 to 
1929 and rose 42 per cent in 10 years 
from 1939 to 1949. 

On his death in 1924, Gompers left 
to his successors a militant trade un- 
ion movement, guided by sound basic 
principles, applicable to new and 
changing problems. 

At a time when it is particularly 
needed, this practical business union- 
ism, based on moral principles and 
guided by the ideals of human free- 
dom, has spread throughout the 
United States. It makes possible joint 
voluntary action of unions and man- 
agements in meeting the serious eco- 
nomic problems of today. This is our 
hope to avoid government domination. 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



CONVENTION CALL 

TO THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF LOCAL UNIONS OF THE UNITED 
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Greetings: 

You are herewith officially notified that in accordance with the action of the 
General Executive Board, the Twenty- Sixth General Convention of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America will be held in the auditorium 
of the Cincinnati Masonic Temple, Cincinnati, Ohio, beginning Tuesday, Septem- 
ber 5, 1950 at 2:00 P.M. and continue in session from day to day until the busi- 
ness coming before the convention has been completed. 

The basis of representation in the convention herewith follows: 

A Local Union with membership of 100 or less, in good standing, is entitled 
to one delegate; with more than 100 and less than 500 members, two delegates; 
with more than 500 and less than 1,000 members, three delegates; with more 
than 1,000 members, four delegates. 

A Local Union owing two months' tax to the General Ofiice is not entitled to 
representation in the convention. 

The General Executive Board decided, when considering the matter of mak- 
ing arrangements for the coming General Convention, which will be held early 
in September, that owing to the large number of Local Unions in the Brotherhood, 
and undoubtedly the large number of delegates who will be elected, it would 
expedite the arrangements to a great extent by having the delegates elected in the 
months of April and May instead of June and July; the names of delegates elected 
to be in the General Office not later than June 15, 1950. 

In compiling the General Constitution after the last referendum vote, there 
was an oversight in reference to changing Paragraph E, Section 18 to conform 
to and define the eligibility of a member to represent the Brotherhood as outlined 
in Section 31, Paragraph D, therefore the rule prevailing in reference to the 
eligibility of a member to be elected as a delegate to the General Convention 
shall be as set forth in Section 31, Paragraph D of the General Constitution, de- 
fining the eligibility of a member to be elected or selected as an officer of a 
Local Union. 

Each delegate will be entitled to one vote. Proxy representation is not allowed. 

Each delegate establishes claim to a seat in the convention through official 
credentials supplied by the General Office which must be properly filled out and 
signed by the President and Recording Secretary of the Local Um'on which he 
represents, with the seal of the Local Union affixed thereto. 

A delegate must have his due book with him to show that he has been a 
member in good standing twelve months prior to his election. 

The expense of each delegate attending the convention is to be paid by the 
Local Union he represents. 

The Recording Secretary must report at once to the Acting General Secretary 
the name and postoffice address of the delegate and alternate under penalty of 
fine as provided in Paragraph F, Section 18 of our General Laws. When the name 
of the delegate is reported to the General Office, blank credentials and further 
information will be sent to the elected delegate. 

With best wishes and kindest regards, we are 



Fraternally yours. 



WM. 



L. HUTCHESON 
General President. 



ALBERT E. FISCHER 

Acting Secretary. 



-SIP 



DON'T FORGET THE GIFT 

Recently compiled figures indicate that 
something like eight million dollars was 
spent on lobbying in Washington last year. 
That is a lot of money in any league. How- 
ever, Big Business interests which shell out 
a very substantial percentage of the moola 
figure they must get value received for their 
dough because indications are that they will 
spend as much or more this year. 

Lobbying is a new technique just now 
coming into its own. Special interest groups 
hire some smooth operator who knows his 
way around the Capital to boost their in- 
terests. They give the operator a nice fat 
salary and a juicy expense account. With 
entertainment, favors, etc. the operator goes 
to work on Congressmen; sort of like the 
Irishman who was going to celebrate his 
silver wedding anniversary. 

Inviting a friend to the party, the Irish- 
man gave instructions as to how his place 
could be found. "We live on the fifth floor," 
he said, "apartment B. Just touch the but- 
ton with your elbow." 

"And why should I use my elbow?" en- 
quired the friend. 

"Mike, me lad," replied the Irishman, 
"you'd not be coming empty-handed, would 
ye' now?" 




4,7. is3-e3gg3-© 1950 <^^£ StaMMTz 

"Not here! They're anti-laborr 



STORY WITH A MORAL 

Under the sponsorship of Senator Robert- 
son, an anti-labor bill that could make the 
Taft-Hartley Law look like the Wagner 
Act has been introduced. All that the new 
law proposes to do is to classify human 
labor to all intents and purposes as an 
article of commerce like girdles and saddle 
soap, thus making labor organizations sub- 
ject to anti-trust laws. 

From where we sit, labor seems to be in 
a spot about like the restaurant patron who 
called the waiter. 

"I've never seen anything as tough as 
this steak," complained the patron. 

"You haven't?" repUed the waiter: "Just 
wait until you've seen the manager." 

MORAL: Be siure to register and vote or 
things are going to get tougher for all work- 
ing people. 

* • • 

WE ARE NOT ALONE 

Despite all we can do, tj'pographical er- 
rors will creep into this publication occa- 
sionally. Just so you won't think we are 
careless or sloppy or unique, take a look 
at some of the boners some other publica- 
tions have let slip through recently: 

Fifty-nine years he practiced medicine, 
being responsible for most of the babies 
born in this community. 

The club meets only once a year and 
that is when they transact all their business 
and enjoy the evening togetlier— wives are 
bared. 

He is the proud possessor of a new Chev- 
rolet and also a new wife, having traded 
in the old one for which he received a 
liberal allowance. 

After Governor watched the 

lion perform, he was taken to Main Street 
and fed twenty-five pounds of raw meat 
in front of the Fox Theater. 

After the musical portion of the program, 

Pastor deUvered a short sermon 

on "Personal Devils." Seventeen were pres- 
ent. 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



SEEMS LIKELY 

Down in a certain southern state, a new- 
ly elected representative from a rural dis- 
trict went to pay his respects to the gover- 
nor. Ignorant of the temi of respect he 
should use in addressing his Excellency, 
the yahoo called him "Most High." 

"Oh," replied the governor, with a laugh 
"I'm not the Most High. The Most High 
is He who has made all things from noth- 
ing." 

"Well," replied the representative, in a 
sudden burst of honest emotion, "that 
mighty near qualifies you, Guv. That jus- 
tice of the peace }'ou appointed down in 
my town is about the nearest thing to nothin' 
I've seen on t\vo legs!" 

In view of the fact the recent coal strike 
dramatically pro\ed how unworkable the 
Taft-Hartle\' Law really is, would it be 
possible to call Senator Taft "Most High" 
too, because he still keeps boosting the 
law as a good piece of legislation? 

* * * 
JUST MEDIUM 

Noting in a woman's magazine that a 
near-record number of marriages is pre- 
dicted for this spring and summer, Joe 
Paup, a veteran sailor on the sea of matri- 
mony, added the following item to his im- 
mortal list of "Paup's Pearly Gems." 

"The average man is neither so clever 
as his wife thought him when they were 
engaged, nor as big a dope as she thinks 
him now they are married." 

* * • 

THE CHEAPEST SYSTEM 

If j'ou ha\e not as yet made your two 
dollar voluntary contribution to Labor's 
League for Political Education, do not for- 
get to take care of this important item next 
meeting night. Your two bucks donation 
will not only help to elect a liberal Con- 
gress, but also it will help to give your 
state the kind of liberal legislation its work- 
ing citizens need. During the last campaign, 
there were many different types of cam- 
paigns for funds. This year there is only 
the LLPE solicitation which will cover 
everything. 

Chip in your two bucks and you can be 
like the Scotsman who went into a saddlery 
shop and asked to buy one spur. 

"I'm sorry, sir," replied the clerk, "but 
we only sell spurs by the pair." 

"That may be so," replied the man from 
Aberdeen, "but I only want one spur. If I 
can get one half of the horse mo\ing, the 
other half will come with it." 



NOT VERY AMUSING 

Movie houses throughout the nation are 
waging an all-out battle to get the twenty 
per cent amusement tax lifted when Con- 
gress writes its new tax bill. Mo\ie men 
say the tax is grossly unfair. 

And judging from some of the pictures 
we have seen lately we are inclined to be- 
lieve the tax is misnamed too. 

* • • 

A GREAT HANDICAP 

In the British elections held late in Feb- 
ruary, tlie Labor Party managed to stay in 
power by a ver}' slight majority. Ever 
since, all the poHtical big-wigs in this coun- 
try have been trying to uncover "trends" 
and "mandates" in the election results. 

What the election proves, we don't know. 
All we know is that the Labor Party won 
out against terrific odds. How terrific those 
odds were can be gleaned from the fact 
the Gallup Poll even predicted labor would 
win. 

* • * 

MAYBE TAFT WAS PULLING IT 

(An Associated Press Dispatch from Glendale, 
Cal. ) 

"I've broken my leg," explained Wendell 

Holmes Teat, fifty-three, when pohce found 

him lying in the street. He was rushed to 

Physicians and Surgeons Hospital, but when 

the doctors examined him they withdrew 

from the case and called a carpenter. Pohce 

said Mr. Teat forgot to mention that the leg 

was wooden. 




31 /■••■■ -siEEEB-j © 1949 Carl ^ta/^^wiTz 

'I trust you won't try to curry favor 
with some cheap, non-union made 
trinkets!" 



THE LOCKER 

By JOHN HART, Local Union 366, New York, N. Y. 



A written test for the position of city carpenter held recently in New York consisted of 

200 true or false Questions. 50 of these are submitted as a fairly stiff workout for our 
apprentices. Score 2 points for each one right. Total points is the percentage. Answers on 
page 33. The more experienced carpenter should sit this one out and wait for the next 
issue. If he insists on playing, then he should shoot for 100. 

True or 
False 

1. A butt gauge is a tool used in hanging interior or exterior doors 

2. A skillsaw (sic) is commonly used in constructing frame buildings 

3. A back band is part of a door casing 

4. A battened door has no panels 

5. Spruce wood is non-resinous 

6. When setting a cross cut saw the whole tooth should be bent 

7. Sash lifts help to balance a double-hung sash 

8. A miter box is used to cut cin-ves of different radii 

9. A strap hinge and a T hinge are the same 

10. A twelve penny common nail is 3% inches long 

11. Bridging can be made from wood or metal 

12. Headers run parallel to floor joists 

13. The pitli of a tree has no structural value 

14. Dowels are used in edge joints to strengtlnen them 

15. A butt joint is no more difficult to make than a rabbeted joint 

16. The stile is the horizontal member of a door frame 

17. The bottom rail of a door is usually made wider than the upper 

18. A transom is a sash over a door or window 

19. Sub flooring and rough flooring are the same 

20. A number 13 auger bit will drill a %-inch hole 

21. A nosing is a term used in stair building 

22. An octagon is a seven-sided figure 

23. A cleat is a piece of wood used to hold 2 or more pieces of wood together 

24. The standard lengtli of wood lath is 4 feet 

25. Floor joists embedded in brick walls should be cut on a bevel 

26. End grain holds nails better than edge grain 

27. Herring bone is a design for flooring 

28. A'pilaster and a column are the same 

29. A waler is a member usually found in brace frame construction 

30. A lintel is the head member of a double-hung window 

31. A round head screw requires no countersinking 

32. Crown is a term used in setting floor joists 

33. White pine comes from a broad leaf tree 

34. Carriage bolts are bolts witli square heads 

35. Braced framing is structurally stronger tlian balloon framing 

36. Floor beams are set with tlie hollow edge up : 

37. Batter boards are supports in a roof truss 

38. The motion of a band saw is continuous in one direction 

39. The horizontal division between a double-hung window is a mulhon 

40. A lolly (sic) colmnn is a wooden post 

41. An astragal is used on a double-hung window 

42. The first layer of wood over the rough frame is known as sheathing 

43. Maple and beech have similar tex-ture 

44. A bay window is a projection on a roof top . 

45. A water level is sometimes used by carpenters 

46. Sheathing boards are usually made from white pine limiber 

47. The table of a band saw is in two parts 

48. A soffit is part of a roof cornice 

49. Hip rafters extend from ridge to plate 

50. Grounds are used at rough openings as a guide for plastering 

Apprentice rating: 70 to 80, ver>' good. Over 80, excellent. Over 90, superlative. 






Official Information 




General Officers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



Qbnbeal Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Acting Secretary 

ALBERT E. FISCHER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill B. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, O. WM. BLAIBK 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 

1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the Acting Secretary 



Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of April, May, and June, 1950, 
containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local Unions 
of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt of this cir- 
cular should notify Albert E. Fischer, Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. «_ — — 

REGULAR MEETING OF GENERAL 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, Florida 
February 20, 1950 

Since the previous meeting of the General Executive Board the following trade move- 
ments were acted upon: 

October 10, 1949 

San Francisco, Calif., L. U. 3141. (Furniture-Woodworkers)— Movement for an increase 
in wages from $1.20, $1.32 and $1.57 to $1.43, $1.55 and $1.80 per hour, effective October 
10, 1949. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

October 14, 1949 

New Smyrna Beach, Fla., L. U. 318.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.50 per hour, effective December 15, 1949. Official stinction granted. 



20 THE CARPENTER 

October 2T, 1949 

Watertown, S. D.. L. U. 1690.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 30 to 
SI. 85 per hour, effective October 27, 1949. Official sanction granted. 

Decatur. 111., L. U. 742. (MiUmen)— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 45 
to SI. 70 per horn:, effective January- 2, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Athens, Ala., L. U. 1311.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 25 to SI. 40 per 
hour, effective Januar>' 3, 1930. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Hartford, Conn., L. U. 1941.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 55 to SI. 63 
per hour, effective January- 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

November 8, 1949 

Houston, Texas, L. U. 724.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 65 to SI. 77^2 
per hour, effective November 7, 1949. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

December 19. 1949 
Tiffin, Ohio, L. U. 243.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. SO to S2.00 per 

hour, effective Januar>' 16, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Westboro. Mass., L. U. 1459.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 50 to 

S2.02H per hour, effective Januar\- 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Monahans, Texas, L. U. 1923.— Movement for an increase in wages from Sl.S7-'-2 to 

S2.25 per hour, effective January' 22, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

December 27, 1949 

Marlboro. Mass., L. U. 988.- Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 50 to S2.00 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Johnston Cit>-, 111., L. U. 1029.— Movement for an increase in wages from S1.37^i to- 
SI. 30 per hour, effective Januarv- 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Hutchinson, Kans., L. U. 1587.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 73 to 
S2.00 per hour, effective March 1, 1930. Official sanction granted. 

January- 9, 1930 

Dothan, Ala., L. U. 2223.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 50 to SI. 75 
per hour, effective Januar>- 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Ottumwa, Iowa, L. U. 767.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI, SO to S2.25 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Newion, N. J., L. U. 1124.— Movement for an increase in wages from S2.00 to S2.23 
per hour, effective Januar\- 13, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

January- 11, 1950 

New Milford. Conn., L. U. 1005.— Movement for an increase in wages from S1.25 to 
S2.00 per hour, effective March 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Diilican, Okla., L. U. 2221.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 75 to S2.00 
per hour, effective January- 15, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

January- 19, 1950 

Portland, Ore., L. U. 1020. (Shipwrights-Joiners,)— Movement for an increase in wages 
from SI. 66 (New Work) SI. 75 (Repair Work) to S2.10 per hour, effective March 20, 1950. 
OflBcial sanction granted without financial aid. 

JanuaiA" 26, 1950 

Traverse Cit>", Mich., L. U. 1461.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 75 to 
S2.00 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Boulder, Colo., L. U. 1480.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. SO to S2.10 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Woodward, Okla., L. U. 1894.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 50 to SI. 75 
per hour, effective March 17, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Seaford. Dela., L. U. 2012.— Movement for an increase in wages from S2.05 to S2.40 per 
hoTor, effecti\'e Januan.^ 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Januar\- 31, 1950 

Jacksonville, 111., L. U. 904. (Millmen''— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37^ 
to S1.45 per hour, effective April 1, 1950, Official sanction granted. 

Februar>- 7. 1950 

Salem, Ohio, L. U. 1282.— Movement for an increase in w-ages from SI. 75 to S2.00 
per hour, effective Februar>' 6, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Februar>- 8, 1950 

S. Pittsburg, Tenn., L. U. 1608.- Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 72^2 to 
SI. 90 per hour, effective Febnoarv- 8, 1950. Official sanction granted. 



THE CARPENTER 21 

Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, Florida 
February 20, 1950 

The General Executive Board met in regular session at the Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, 
Florida, on the above date. 

The report of the Delegate to the Sixty-Fourth Annual Convention of the Trades and 
Labor Congress of Canada, held in the City of Calgary, Alberta, during the week of Sep- 
tember 15, 1949, was ordered filed for future reference as it already has been published in 
oiu: official journal, "The Carpenter" for the information of our members. 

Report of the Delegates to tlie Forty-Second Annual Convention of the Building and 
Construction Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor, held in St. Paul, 
Minnesota, in September, 1949, was filed for future reference as it has already been pub- 
lished in the November, 1949, issue of "The Carpenter" for the information of our members. 

Report of the Delegates to tlie Sixty-Eighth Annual Convention of the American Feder- 
ation of Labor held in St. Paul, Minnesota, in October, 1949, was filed for future reference 
as it has already been published in the December, 1949, issue of "The Carpenter" for the 
information of our members. 

Report of the Delegates to the Forty-First Annual Convention of the Union Label 
Trades Department of the American Federation of Labor, held in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 
September, 1949, was filed for future reference as it has been published in the January, 
1950, issue of "The Carpenter" for the information of our members. 

Renewal of burglary insurance policy on office furniture, fixtures and equipment at 
Headquarters, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, in the amount of $10,000 
through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, Maryland, expiring 
October 1, 1952, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Burglary, Hold-up and Robbery Insurance— $5,000 Interior hold-up; $5,000 
Messenger hold-up, and $15,000 Safe and burglary on safes in Headquarters' Building, 222 
East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, through the United States Fidelity and Guar- 
anty Company, Baltimore, Maryland, expiring September 12, 1952, was referred to our 
Legal Department. 

Renewal of Bond on General Treasurer, S. P. Meadows, in tlie amount of $50,000 for 
one year expiring February 1, 1951, through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Com- 
pany of Baltimore, Maryland, was referred to our Legal Department. 

The General President appointed the following committee to inspect the rooms of the 
Home: 

Arthur Martel 
Roland Adams 
He also appointed the following on the inspection of stocks and supplies: 

M. A. Hutcheson 
Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Balance of tlie members of tlie Board to audit tlie books and accounts of the Home. 
Belleville, Ont., Canada, L. U. 572.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1,50 per hour, efPective March 23, 1950. Official sanction granted, witliout financial aid. 

Colimibus, Ind., L. U. 1155.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to $2.00 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Fort William, Ont., Canada, L. U. 1669.-Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.46 to $1.65 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, \\ithout finan- 
cial aid. 

Februar>' 21, 1950 

The General President reported the action of the Executive Council of tlie American 
Federation of Labor concerning the proposed reaffiliation of the Machinists' International 
Union witli the American Federation of Labor— giving in detail all that transpired in- 
cluding his position on the reaffiHation. The General Executi\e Board appro\ed of his 
position by unanimous action. 

Request of President Hayes of the International Association of Machinists for a con- 
ference witii the Brotherhood was placed before die General Executive Board by the 
General President and was considered. M. A. Hutcheson, First General \'ice-President, 
O. Wm. Blaier, Board Member of the Second District and Harry Schwarzer, Third Dis- 



22 THECARPENTEK 

trict, were appointed as Committee to confer with Committee of the International Associa- 
tion of Machinists. 

Resolutions from Local Union 106, Des Moines, Iowa and Local Union 218, Boston, 
Massachusetts, endorsed by several Local Unions of tlie Brotlierhood, were brought to 
the attention of tlie Board, likewise amendments to tlie General Constitution, submitted 
by Local LInion 854, Cincinnati, Ohio and Local Union 132, Washington, D. C, were 
considered. 

It was decided tliat these Local Unions be notified tliat the suggested changes to tlie 
General Constitution were considered by tlie General Executive Board and tliat same A^all 
be referred to the Constitution Committee who will report to the next General Conven- 
tion. 

It was further decided tliat all proposed amendments to the General Constitution will 
be published in our journal, "The Carpenter" after tlie Juh' 15tli date preceding tlie Con- 
vention. 

It was suggested that inasmuch as se^•eral Local Unions are desirous of a change being 
made in our General Constitution in reference to tlie pension, tliat a committee of the 
Board be appointed to work out something understandable and comprehensive and report 
to the next General Convention tlieir recommendations. 

The General President stated, tliere being no objections the minutes will show that at 
this meeting of the Board a committee of tlie Board was selected to make a sur\'ey of tlie 
situation as affecting payment of tlie pension and compile a report to be submitted to the 
next General Convention. 

Board Members Charles Johnson, Jr., O. \Ym. Blaier. of tlie First and Second Districts 
respectively, were appointed as a Committee to work in conjunction witli M. A. Hutclie- 
son. First General Vice-President. 

New Haven, Conn., L. U. 79.— Movement for an increase in wages from S2.10 to S2.35 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Point Pleasant, W. Va., L. U. 1159.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 
to $2.25 (Carpenters) and $2.12y2 to $2.37V2 (Millwrights and Pile Drivers) per hour, effec- 
tive April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

February 22, 1950 

A Protest from Local Union 80, Chicago, Illinois against the decision of the Chairman 
of the Chicago District Council in declaring tlie proposition of increasing tlie per capita 
tax payable to tlie District Council from 10c to 20c per member per month as being 
carried was read. The reply by the General President, dated December 1, 1949, wherein 
he conc^urred in the action taken by tlie District Council was also read. A motion pre- 
vailed that the action of tlie General President be sustained. Unanimously carried. 

Resolution from Twin Cit\' Carpenters District Council, St. Paul, Minnesota dealing 
N^-itli the lOOtli anniversary of tlie birth of Samuel Gompers, and also the late Franklin 
D. Roose\-elt, witli the suggestion tliat their names be inscribed in tlie Hall of Fame. 

The Board concurred in said resolution. 

The Board's attention was called to tlie membership application of Walter E. Wiggins 
to Local Union 1867, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada wherein he answered in tlie aflfirma- 
tive to the questions, "Are you a Communist?" and also, "Are you in s>-nipatli>- with com- 
munistic philosophy?" 

Reply of Local Union 1867 to an inquir\- regarding this was read wherein tliey stated 
this seemed to be correct. 

On January 26, 1950, Second General \'ice-President, John R. Stevenson repHed to 
Local Union 1867 directing tliem to strike the name of ^\"alter E. Wiggins from the mem- 
bership list of Local Union 1867. 

Motion prevailed that the letter written by tlie Second General Vice-President be 
approved. Carried unanimously. 

A communication from Local Union 1073, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania soliciting finan- 
cial and moral assistance for the Histadrut was presented to tlie Board, and after dis- 
cussion it was moved and carried that tlie matter be left in tlie hands of the General 
President. Carried. 

Communication from Harr,- F. Morton of Kaiser Engineers, Division of Kaiser Indus- 
tries Incorporated, Oakland, California, enclosing a copy of proposed international agree- 



THE CARPENTER 23 

ment was read. After due consideration, the Board came to the conclusion tliat our pres- 
ent international agreement which has been in existence for many years has proven very 
satisfactory to the employers who are signatory to the agreement. The Board decided there 
would be no change in our international agreement and any construction emplo>-er desiring 
an international agreement would be required to sign the present agreement. 

Haverhill, Mass., L. U. 82.— Movement for an increase in wages from Si. 75 to .$2.00 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Bozeman, Montana, L. U. 557.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.80 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Claries Summit, Pa., L. U. 339.— Movement for an increase in wages from S1.50 to $2.00 
per hour, effecti^■e April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Glasgow, Mont., L. U. 1211.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1..50 to $2.00 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Monmouth, 111., L. U. 126.5.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.75 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Elyria, Ohio, L. U. 1426.— Mo\ement for an increase in wages from $2.25 to S2.50 per 
hour, effecti\e April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

February 23, 1950 

Appeal of Lloyd Raduenz, Ervin Raduenz and Wilbur Raduenz, members of Local 
Union 2144, Los Angeles, California, against tlie decision of the General President in their 
case versus the Los Angeles District Council, Los Angeles, California, was brought to the 
attention of the Board and carefully considered, after which the decision of the General 
President was sustained unanimously, on the grounds set forth therein, and the appeal 
dismissed. 

Appeal of Frank A. Callioun, a member of Local Union 1849, Pasco, W'^ashington, 
against the decision of the General President in his case versus the Portland District Coun- 
cil, Portland, Oregon, was brought to the attention of the Board and carefully considered 
after which the decision of the General President was sustained unanimousl}^, on the grounds 
set forth therein, and the appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Lloyd Westlake, a member of Local Union 25, Los Angeles, California, 
against the decision of the General President in the case of he, Lloyd Westlake versus 
Los Angeles District Council was carefully considered, after which the decision of tlie 
General President was sustained, and the appeal dismissed. 

Communication from Pacific Coast Coimcil of Pile Drivers, Bridge, Dock and Wharf 
Builders, San Francisco, California requesting a charter for the Council abo\e named was 
read. 

Under the provisions of the Constitution, the granting of charters comes under direc- 
tion of tlie General President, and, therefore, the General Executive Board referred same 
to the General President for disposition. 

A petition of millwrights in area of tlie Falls Cities District Council, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, protesting the denial of a millwright charter by the First General Mce-President was 
presented to tlie Board. 

A motion prevailed to sustain the action of tlie First General Vice-President. 

A communication, dated December 28, 1949, by the Local Union 638, Morristown, 
New Jersey was submitted to the Board wherein they requested restoration of their former 
jurisdictional territory. 

The Board decided they could see no reason why they should change tiieir previous 
action in sustaining the jurisdictional lines of Local Union 638 as defined by tiie General 
President. 

Audit of books and accounts commenced. 

February 24, 1950 

Appeal of Local Union 1980, Atchison, Kansas, from the decision of tlie General Treas- 
urer in disapproving the disability claim of Fred B. Clark, a member of said Local Union, 
was considered and the decision of the General Treasurer was unanimously sustained. 

Appeal of Local Union 94, Providence, Rhode Island, from die decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the claim of Brother Joseph Melancon for wife funeral dona- 
tion was considered, after which a motion prevailed that the claim be referred back to 
tlie General Treasurer for further investigation. Unanimously carried. 

(Continued on page 27) 



Editorial 




Increasing Productivity Is Shrinking Jobs 

Currently most newspapers and radio commentators are lambasting the 
government over the surplus fann commodity situation. They are giving the 
administi-ation both barrels over the fact that millions of bushels of potatoes 
are being ruined with kerosene and millions of dozens of eggs and tons of 
butter and cheese are being allowed to spoil naturally in government ware- 
houses and caves. The government paid out good tax money to buy these 
farm items so that high prices could be maintained. Now there seems to be 
nothing to do with them other than to let them spoil. 

That people should be alarmed over such a situation is only natural. How- 
ever, as we see it, farm surplus is only one phase of a huge, overall problem 
that needs solving in short order. The big problem is increasing productivity. 
On the farm and in the city, higher productivity is creating a situation that 
can and will mean trouble eventually unless fast action is forthcoming. Dur- 
ing 1949, output of goods and services in the United States amounted to 
nearly 260 billion dollars. Roughly that figure was about the same as the 
figure for 1948. The catch is that it took three per cent fewer workers in 
1949 to produce the same amount of goods and services that was turned out in 
1948. In other words, three workers out of a hundred were fighting unem- 
ployment lines in 1949 while the other ninety-seven were turning out the same 
amount of goods 100 workers turned out in 1948. The upward trend in pro- 
ducti\dt>' is as noticeable on the fann as it is in the factor>^ Ever since 1947 
the nymber of workers on our farms has been dwindling, yet total produc- 
tion has been increasing slightly. 

Unemployment figures tell the story more graphically than any other thing. 
In February, the total number of unemployed climbed to 4,700.000, the high- 
est figure since the start of the war; this despite the fact that the nation was 
still enjoying a comparative boom. A substantial part of this unemployment 
must be charged to increased productivity. Labor-saving devices have been 
going into business at a brisk clip. These machines are now showing a marked 
influence on unemployment figures as fewer men or less time are needed to 
turn out goods or services. An expert estimates that higher productivit}' threw 
a minimum of three quarters of a milhon workers on to the unemployed roles 
during the last year. During the same time, some 600,000 new workers entered 
the labor market. Added together, these two groups accounted for a sub- 
stantial percentage of the million and a half increase in unemployed. 

The picture is not to pretty. Yet it has its brighter side too. The number 
of men and women working is still at the highest point it has ever been for 
any year in our history except a couple of the extraordinary war years. Sav- 
ings are still high. The accumulated backlog of demand for goods of all kinds 
is still strong. Most lines of business are thriving. Prospects for continued 
good times seem encouraging. If it were not for the problem of shrinking em- 



THE CARPENTER 25 

ployment opportunities brought about by higher productivity there would be 
hardly a cloud on the horizon. 

However, each year some 600,000 young men and women enter the labor 
market in search of their first jobs. If industry cannot find jobs for these new 
recruits; or worse, if industry already has on its hands large numbers of sea- 
soned workers whose jobs have been wiped out by higher productivity, a 
critical situation is bound to arise sooner or later. 

Yet basically high productivity is nothing to fear. As a matter of fact it 
is and always has been a major objective in American industry. Higher pro- 
ductivit}^ to a great degree accounts for the great standard of living achieved 
by the American people. More and better goods at a cheaper price mean 
better living for everybody. But increased productivity must be balanced off 
by better wages, which in turn mean greater purchasing power; shorter hours; 
and cheaper prices. These are the three things which must be brought to 
bear on the present unhappy situation wherein productivity is leading to un- 
employment. Lower prices can increase the demand for all kinds of goods. 
Higher wages can increase purchasing power. Shorter hours can increase the 
number of jobs. Will industry recognize the need for these reforms? Possibly. 
Some magazines and writers are already warning industry that trouble lies 
ahead if job opportunities are not kept in line with demand. Let us hope 
their warnings are heeded. 



Re-Assay the Federal Tax Structure 

Speaking through an organization known as the National Committee for 
Repeal of Wartime Excise Taxes, a group of representative business men have 
asked Congress to cut present excise taxes by three billion dollars. 

Actually, what should be done is to cut out all excise and sales taxes- 
period. This is because they are "upside-down" taxes, and as such are inequit- 
able and diametrically opposed to the principle of ability to pay. Like rain, 
excise and sales taxes fall on all alike, rich, poor and middle class. Where they 
cover daily necessities, rather than definite luxuries, such as food, clothing, 
amusements, tobacco and liquors used by many millions of people, they are 
grossly unfair because they take a much larger proportionate bite into the poor 
man's wage than into the rich man's income. A rich man may only spend five 
per cent of his income for food, while the poor man pays out 50 per cent or 
better. 

We believe that the federal government should derive the bulk of its 
revenues from graduated taxes on business profits, personal incomes, gifts and 
inheritances, and capital gains. That is the fair way to levy taxes! 

The 81st Congress has no excuse whatever for refusing to plug up many 
and large loopholes in the present laws whereby corporations in some indus- 
tries and the ultra-rich escape paying a fair and proportionate tax on their 
earnings and incomes. Along with these overdue adjustments, Congress should 
give the tax collection agencies the facilities and manpower to collect tliese 
taxes and vigorously hunt down tax dodgers. 



26 THE CARPENTER 

The time has come to re-assay the entire federal tax structure. It must 
have the double purpose of eliminating inequalities, devising fair methods for 
distributing the tax load, and make these le\"ies easier to collect and as diflBcult 
as possible to evade. 

But at the same time nothing should be left undone to reorganize the agen- 
cies and functions of the federal government to gi^"e us most efficient and eco- 
nomical operation. 

It would be well for Congress to press for this tax study at the earliest pos- 
sible time. The present cumbersome and inequitable tax system is a sword 
of Damocles hanging o\"er our present economy.— St. Louis Labor Tribune. 



The Time Is Past Due 



^^^len the coal operators and the United Mine Workers reached an agree- 
ment last month, one of the bitterest strikes of recent years was brought to a 
close. There ha\"e been longer strikes, and there have been strikes involving 
more men, but there has never been a strike in which more organized vitupera- 
tion and abuse were heaped on a group of working men. The press and the 
radio pulled out all the stops in damning Lewis and the miners. Economic 
breakdown, hunger, pestilence, and chaos were all things that the papers saw 
as more than imminent if the strike was not checked by cossack methods. 
Toda)- the strike has been over only a few weeks. All the hysteria the news- 
papers whipped up o\'er the imminent doom that the strike supposedly pre- 
saged is forgotten. A simple settlement was worked out betvveen the operators 
and the miners, a settlement that could have been worked out months sooner 
had not the operators pinned their hopes on the Taft-Hartley Law. 

It was the Taft-Hartley Law which precipitated the strike in the first place. 
The Taft-Hartley Law pre^■ented normal collective bargaining during the 
strike and delayed the settlement that was finally reached. For months before 
the strike the mine owners climbed on their high horse and made no effort to 
bargain seriously and honestly on the issues presented by the Miners. They 
placed all their hopes on the Taft-Hartle\' Law. A pliant judge could slap 
some mean injunctions on the union in case of a strike. Within the Law were 
vehicles for emptying union treasuries and even sending union leaders to jail 
in case of a protracted strike. No wonder the owners felt secure. 

But they overlooked the tenacity of the miners. The strike came and the 
miners hung together. Neither threats nor sweet promises could budge them. 
Wlien it became apparent to the owmers that the Taft-Hartley Law was not 
going to tear the union asunder, a settlement was soon reached. The strike 
and its settlement ha^•e dramatically pro^■ed what labor has always contended; 
namely, that the Taft-Hartley Law does not pre\ent strikes; it provokes them. 
Instead of halting strikes it prolongs them. Any way you look at it, the Taft- 
Hartley Law has proved itself to be as stupid as it is \dcious. The time for 
erasing it from the statute books is long past due. 



THE CARPENTER 27 

(Continued from page 23) 

Appeal of Local Union 1804, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada from the decision of 
the General Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of William Henderson 
Lemon for the reason that he was not in benefit standing at the time of death was con- 
sidered, after which a motion prevailed that the action of the General Treasurer be sus- 
tained, which carried unanimously. 

Appeal of Local Union 393, Camden, New Jersey from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of Albert M. Hanum was con- 
sidered. It was decided that the claim be referred back to the General Treasurer for 
further investigation. 

Appeal of Local Union 43, Hartford, Connecticut, from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the death claim of Thomas C. LeBlanc, a member of said Local 
Union, was referred back to the General Treasurer. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

February 25, 1950 

The General Executive Board, the various officers and Business Representatives of the 
Florida State Council of carpenters met jointly at the New Florida Hotel, Lakeland, 
Florida, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Samuel Gompers, first Presi- 
dent of the American Federation of Labor. 

Frank Duffy, Secretary Emeritus, who was the principal speaker, pointed out the 
struggle of the early days of the Federation; he having served as a delegate to the A. F. 
of L. conventions for 47 consecutive years. 

He also mentioned General President Hutcheson had attended for 35 consecutive years. 

Brief addresses were also given by the members of the General Executive Board. 

February 27, 1950 
Since the last meeting of the General Executive Board, correspondence was exchanged 
between representatives of former Local Union 634 and the General Office, which we here- 
with quote: 

NIGHT LETTER 

January 13, 1950 
Wm. L. Hutcheson 
Dear Sir and Brother: 

On Wednesday, January lltli, Local 634 passed a motion empowering its Executive 
Board to negotiate a settlement with the General Office. We contacted Brothers Muir and 
Lehman and offered to settle on the terms presented by the General Executive Board at 
the Chicago meeting. Brothers Muir and Lehman refused to discuss it witli us. We are 
sending you this communication to urge that you instruct representatives to meet with us 
to immediately settle the matter of Local 634. 

Lester J. McCormick 
For the Executive Board 

January 17, 1950 
Lester J. McCormick 

The General Executive Board will convene in Lakeland, Florida February 22nd. If 
you wish to send a committee with full power to act the Board will give you a hearing at 
that time. 

M. A. Hutcheson 

For the General President 

January 23, 1950 
Mr. Wilham L. Hutcheson 
General President 
; U. B. C. and J. of A. 
Carpenters Building 
222 East Michigan Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
'Dear Sir and Brother: 

We are confident the controversy between Local 634 and the Brotlierhood can be 

|) settled out of Court on February 22nd to the mutual satisfaction of all parties concerned. 

Therefore, we are again requesting that you act favorably on the recommendation of 

your Los Angeles Attorney in regards to a continuance of the pending litigation, and release 

of enough funds tliat are now held up by restraining order, to enable tlie committee from 



28 THE CARPENTER 

Local 634 to make the trip to Lakeland, Florida to meet with the General Executive Board 
on February 22, 1950. 

Fraternally yours, 
/s/ Lester J. McCormick 

For the Committee 

January 30, 1950 
Lester J. McCormick 
7315 S. San Pedro St. 
Los Angeles, California 

Your communication of the twenty-third ult. has been fonvarded to me here in Miami 
where I am at the present time attending a meeting of the Executive Council of the 
American Federation of Labor. Inasmuch as you and yoiur associates was responsible for 
filing the pending litigation that you are desirous of having postponed would say that you 
could easily have that done by filing a dismissal and make your arrangements to appear 
before the General Executive Board. 
WLHG Wm. L. Hutcheson 

M. A. Hutcheson 
New Florida Hotel 
Lakeland, Florida 

The committee from Local 634 will arrive in time to meet the General Executive Board, 
nine A. M., Wednesday, February 22nd. 

L. J. McCormick 

For the Committee 

Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, Florida 
On February 23, 1950, Lester J. McCormick, James T. Allen and Thomas Bankhead, 

all of Los Angeles, California, appeared before the General Executive Board and oflFered 

purported credentials, with power to act, as delegates elected by purported members of 

fonner Local Union No. 634. 

Upon suggestion of the General President that they state their questions or proposals i 

in writing the aforementioned retired and submitted the following: i 

"These are supplementary questions the Committee would like the 
Board to consider in conjunction with the ten points of the Chicago 
meeting. 

The membership of Local 634 feels very strongly about points No. 
► 1 & 2. And we wish tlie Board would consider them favorably. 

1. Elections of officers. We would like for the Board to consider for us 
to nominate and elect our own officers in an election under the Con- 
stitution. 

2. There would be no reprisals against any member of Local 634 for 
anything that has happened during this controversy or anything that 
may come up later because of it. 

3. All court cases to be dismissed, both parties paying their own costs. 

4. In the event of an amalgamation, on what basis would the Board con- 
sider it." 

The General Executive Board, having considered the above requests, finds that ample 
opportunity has been granted heretofore to said former Local Union No. 634 to retain 
membership in the United Brotherhood by complying with the Constitution and Laws of 
the Brotlierhood, and tliat no favorable consideration can be given to any oral or written 
requests presented by its alleged representatives. 

The General Executive Board has heretofore endeavored to avoid working any hard- 
ship on former members of former Local Union 634 who desired to remain loyal to the 
Brotherhood by granting them tiie privilege of retaining their status with the Brotherhood. 
A large majority of the members of former Local Union 634 has made application and 
received clearance cards. 

The General Executive Board has decided to extend tliis privilege to tliose who have 
not as yet obtained dieir clearance cards, and who are desirous of maintaining membership 
in tlie Brotherhood. 



THE CARPENTER 29 

This privilege is extended to March 31, 1950 for apphcations to be filed with the 
General President who is hereby granted full discretionary power to act favorably, or other- 
wise, as he deems advisable, on each application. 

Edmonton, Alta., Canada, L. U. 1325.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1. 47^/2 
to $1.55 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Terre Haute, Ind., L. U. 133.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.10 to $2.35 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Concord, N. H., L. U. 538.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to $2.00 
per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Columbia, Mo., L. U. 1925.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87% to$2.00 
per hour, effective April 15, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Dyersburg, Tenn., L. U. 2373.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective March 16, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Audit of books and accounts continued. 

February 28, 1950 

Appeal of Charles J. Bercher, a member of Local Union 228, Pottsville, Pennsylvania, 
from the decision of tlie General Treasurer, on his claim for disability donation was care- 
fully considered. It was decided that Local Union 228 be notified that the appeal was 
given consideration and due to extenuating circumstances set forth in the correspondence 
that the claim be referred back to the General Treasurer to hold in abeyance to see what 
develops, and see whether the prospective operation will be beneficial or not, or at some 
time in the future he will be totally disabled. 

Appeal from the decision of the General Treasurer in the claim of Morris Tauber, 
deceased, of Local Union 608, New York City, in allowing an amount of $150.00 per 
Section 49-D of our General Constitution as tlie decedent was over fifty years of age when 
initiated. A motion prevailed that the action of the General Treasurer be sustained and 
tlie appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Local Union 956, New York, New York, from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the disability claim of Anthony Tramintano, a member of said 
Local Union, was after due consideration referred back to tlie General Treasurer for further 
information; particularly as to when the applicant for disability first received medical 
attention, and what has been done since that time. 

Appeal of Local Union 1920, Mineral Wells, Texas, from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of the late W. R. Craig for tlie 
reason he was not in benefit standing at the time of death, was considered and the action of 
the General Treasurer was sustained. 

Appeal of Local Union 195, Peru, Illinois, from the decision of the General Treasurer 
in disapproving the claim for funeral donation of Margaret Hocking, wife of Lewis Hock- 
ing, a member of said Local Union, for the reason that he was not in benefit standing at 
tlie time of her death, was considered and the decision of the General Treasurer sustained. 

Appeal of Local Union 534, Burlington, Iowa, from the decision of the General Treas- 
urer in disapproving the claim for funeral donations of Fred Roxlau for die reason tliat he 
was not in benefit standing at the time of death was carefully considered, after which a 
motion prevailed that the action of the General Treasurer be sustained. 

Appeal of Local Union 2808, Areata, California, from tlie decision of tlie General 
Treasurer in allowing the amount of $150.00 in the case of Laniour Wm. Ewell for funeral 
donations was considered. A motion prevailed that tiie action of the General Treasurer 
be sustained. Unanimously carried. 

Kane, Pa., L. U. 545.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.37y2 to $1.75 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Nashville, Tenn., L. U. 507.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.80 to $2.10 
per hour, effective June 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Sterling, 111., L. U. 695.-Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 per 
hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Davenport, la., L. U. 726.-Movement for an increase in wages from $1.30 to $1.45 
per hour, effective May 19, 1950. Official sanction granted, witliout financial aid. 



30 THE CARPENTER 

Muscatine, la., L. U. 1069.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

March 1, 1950 
A telegram from Harry C. Herman, representing the Radio Corporation of America 
was read in protest to the additional excise tax of 10% on all television sets and solicit 
the General Executive Board to adopt a resolution to support their protest. After duly 
considering same the Board concurred in their protest and resolution was drafted, which 
reads as follows: 

WHEREAS, the Congress of the United States saw fit to impose heavy 

excise taxes on many commodities during the ^var as a means 
of raising revenue and discouraging the purchase of non- 
essential items, and 

WHEREAS, such a tax may have served a useful purpose during the 

war, and 

WHEREAS, now that tlie war is over such burdensome taxes work a real 

hardship in many ways by reducing pin-chasing power, 
handicapping struggling new industries, reducing job oppor- 
tunities, etc., and 

WHEREAS, all these things are harmful to otu: economy and not condu- 

cive to a stable and continuous prosperit>', 

THEREFORE The General Executive Board of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America, now in session, went 
on record as being in fa\or of a reduction of all excise taxes 
now in existence, and also \oiced their opposition to the 
placing of new excise taxes on new products or commodities. 

The General Executive Board when considering the matter of making arrangements 
for the coming General Convention, which will be held early in September, came to the 
conclusion that owing to the large number of Local Unions in tlie Brotherhood and un- 
doubtedly the large number of delegates who will be elected, it would expedite the 
arrangements to a great extent by having the delegates elected in the months of April 
and May instead of June and July; the names of tlie delegates elected to be in the General 
Office not later than June 15, 1950. 

In compiling the General Constitution after the last referendum vote there was an 
oversight in reference to changing Paragraph E, Section 18 to conform and define the 
eUgibility of a member to represent the Brotherhood as outlined in Section 31, Paragraph 
D, tlierefore, the rule pre\'ailing in reference to the eligibility of a member to be elected as 
a delegate to the General Convention shall be as set forth in Section 31, Paragraph D of 
the General Constitution, defining the eligibility of a member to be elected or selected as 
an officer of a Local Union. 

The Convention Call was drafted and approved and to be issued without delay to 
the Local Unions of the United Brotherhood. 

It was decided by the General Executive Board that because of the size of the organi- 
zation, advance committees, as provided for in the General Constitution be increased to 
fifteen members. The matter of arranging for program for opening of convention, as well 
as invitations to speakers was left in the hands of the resident General Officers. 

The General President appointed Board Members 
A. Muir, Sixth District 
R. Adams, Fourth District 
R. E. Roberts, Fifth District 
to draft the reports of the General Executive Board and the Board of Trustees for sub- 
mission to the Twenty-Sixth General Convention. 

Audit completed and all transactions found correct. 

The General Executive Board met as Board of Trustees and the minutes were approved. 

The Certified Pubfic Accountants examined the securities held by the General Treasurer 
in the Vaults of the Indiana National Bank, Indianapolis, Indiana and their report as of 
December 31, 1949, shows the following: 





THE CARPENTER 




31 




GENERAL FUND 






Purchased: 








Due: 


December 1, 1942 


$1,000,000.00 


U. S. Treasury 


2%s 


1963-68 


April 15, 1943 


1,000,000.00 


U. S. Treasury 


2%s 


1964-69 


September 14, 1943 


500,000.00 


U. S. Treasury 


2%s 


1964-69 


November 20, 1945 


1,000,000.00 


U. S. Treasury 


2y4s 


1959-62 


September, 1941 


50,000.00 


U. S. Series G 


2%s 


1953 


January, 1942 


50,000.00 


U.S. Series G 


2%s 


1954 


August, 1942 


50,000.00 


U. S. Series G 


2y2s 


1954 


May, 1945 


100,000.00 


U. S. Series G 


2y2s 


1957 




20,000.00 


U. S. Series G 


2y2s 


1957 


September, 1948 


25,000.00 


U. S. Treasviry 

Notes 

(Held in New York) 


iy4s 


1950 


December 1, 1948 


500,000.00 


U. S. Treasury 

Notes 

(Held in New York) 


iy4s 


1950 


December 1, 1948 


200,000.00 


U. S. Treasury 


iy4s 


1950 



December, 1941 
August, 1942 
June, 1948 



December, 1941 
January, 1942 
October, 1942 
January, 1943 
May, 1945 
June, 1943 
December, 1942 
April, 1943 
September, 1943 
December, 1948 



June, 1948 



Pvtfchased: 

March 31. 1944 
March, 1933 
1944 

August, 1946 

June, 1948 

June, 1949 



(Held 



Notes 
in New York) 



DEFENSE FUND 



50,000.00 

50,000.00 

105,000.00 



HOME AND 

$ 50,000.00 

50,000.00 

50,000.00 

50,000.00 

100,000.00 

300,000.00 

500,000.00 

100,000.00 

500,000.00 

500,000.00 



140,000.00 



U. S. Series G 

U. S. Series G 

U. S. Treasury 

Notes 

(Held in New York) 

PENSION FUND 

U. S. Series G 
U. S. Series G 
U. S. Series G 
U. S. Series G 
U. S. Series G 
U. S. Treasure' 
U. S. Treasury 
U. S. Treasury 
U. S. Treasury 
U. S. Treasiury 
Notes 

(Held in New York) 

U. S. Treasur)' 

Notes 

(Held in New York) 



GENERAL FUND (CANADA) 



$ 107,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 



Canadian Bonds 
Canadian Bonds 
Canadian Victory 

Bonds 
Canadian \^ictory 

Bonds 
Canadian Victory 

Bonds 
Dominion of Canada 



2y2s 

2%s 

iy4s 



2y2s 
2y2s 
2y2s 
2y2s 
2y2s 
lyss 
2y2s 
2y2s 
2y2s 
lyis 



iy4s 



3s 
4s 

3s 

l%s 



3s 



1953 
1954 
1950 



1953 

1954 

1954 

1955 

1957 

1950 

1963-68 

1964-69 

1964-69 

1950 



1950 



Due: 

1959 
1960 
1956 

1950 

1958 

1966 



There being no further business to be acted upon the Board adjourned to meet at tlie 
call of the Chainnan. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT E. FISCHER 

Acting Secretary 



Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 



j^ tn tf V X sc xn 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more 



%tBi in ^tntt 

Thm Editor ham been requested to publish the nanxem 
•f the following Brothers who have passed away. 



HOWARD ABELL, L. U. 983, Detroit, Mich. 
JOSEPH ALBERTS, L. U. 1748, Appleton, Wis. 
PAUL ARNDT, L. U. 1149, Oakland, Cal. 
GEO. W. BEASLEY, L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
EDMOND J. BEAULIEU, L. U. 21, Chicago, 111. 
ELIAS BENSON, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
LUDWIG BERG, L. U. 824, Muskegon, Mich. 
JAMES F. BLAKENEY, L. U. 132, Washington, 

D. C. 
J. A. BLAKKE, L. U. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 
OTTO BRIETBECK, L. U. 747, Oswego, N. Y. 
E. J. BROD, L. U. 213, Houston, Tex. 
WILLIE M. BROOKS, L. U. 2183, Tupelo, Miss. 
E. BUSBY, L. U. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 
FREDERICK J. BUTSCH, L. U. 11, Cleveland, 

Ohio 
JOHN BYRNE, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 
SYDNEY G. CARPENTER, L. U. 1230. Franklin, 

A. CARTER, L. U. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

L. E. CHENEYWORTH, L. U. 213, Houston, 

Tex. 
WILLIAM CLARK, L. U. 871, Battle Creek, 

Mich. 
ELBERT CLIFT, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore. 
W. A. COOPER, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
CHAS. D. CORT, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 
FRANCIS J. CURRAN, L. U. 488, New York, 

N. Y. 
JOHN W. DARNELL, L. U. 60, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
H. E. DEANE, L. U. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 
ALFRED DION, L. U. 43, Hartford, Conn. 
GUS ECI2ZI, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 
G. L. FERGUSON, L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Tex. 
HENRY FISCHER, L. U. 301, Newburgh, N. Y. 
VINCENZO GENOVESE, L. U. 1050, Philadel- 

MAT GERHARDS, L. U. 26, Portland. Ore. 
JOHN L. GLARUM, L. U. 948, Sioux City, la. 
HENRY H. GLASS, L. U. 1665, Alexandria, Va. 
GEO. GORTH, L. U. 25, Los Angeles. Cal. 

E. J. GRABKE, L. U. 983, Detroit, Mich. 
WM. GULSDORF. L. U. 1784, Chicago, 111. 
DENNIS D. HALL, L. U. 1665, Alexandria, Va. 
JAMES HARINGTON, L. U. 56, Boston, Mass. 
J. H. HARTMAN, L. U. 213, Houston, Tex. 
S. F. HEAVNER, L. U. 1665, Alexandria, Va. 
ERNEST S. HEDSTROM, L. U. 948, Sioux City, 

la. 
JAMES C. HENDERSON, L. U. 207, Chester, Pa. 

F. HORVATH, L. U. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 
R. B. HUGHES, L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
J. C. HUTTO, L. U. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 
LOUIS HYPES, L. U. 1665, Alexandria, Va. 
E. B. IHINGER, L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
EDGAR JENNINGS, L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
ANDERS JOHNSON, L. U. 1149, Oakland, Cal. 
CHARLES KAMRADT, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 
GEORGE H. KELLEY, L. U. 51, Boston, Mass. 
FRANK KIMEL, L. U. 335, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
WILLIE WEAVER KINGSLEY, L. U. 2183, 

Tupelo, Miss. 
J. F. KIONS, L. U. 990, Greenville, 111. 
FELIX KLIMSKI, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
JOSEPH P. KOHLER, L. U. 1387, Girardville, 

Pa. 



EMIL KORKMAN, L. U. 1149, Oakland, Cal. 

JOHN KULTALA, L. U. 1149, OakIand,_Cal. 

WILLIAM LAKE, L. U. 188, Yonkers, N. Y. 

A. C. LARSEN, L. U. 103, Birmingham, Ala. 

HERBERT LEPAGE, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 

AL. LIEBOLD, L. U. 1138, Toledo, Ohio 

PETER LINDEMANN, L. U. 1784, Chicago, 111. 

AUGUST LINDGREN, L. U. 948, Sioux City, la. 

FREDERICK MACDONALD, L. U. 1230, Frank- 
lin, Mass. 

JOHN R. MCJUNKIN, L. U. 213, Houston, Tex. 

SAM MAID A, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WILLIAM T. MANDERSON, L. U. 188, Yonkers, 
N. Y. 

JOSEPH MARTIN, L. U. 4, Davenport, la. 

HUGHE MATHESON, L. U. 25, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 

BERT MILLER, L. U. 162, San Mateo, Cal. 

JOHN MILLS, L. U. 40, Boston, Mass. 

CHAS. MONTGOMERY, L. U. 60, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

BENJAMIN F. MOORE, L. U. 100. Muskegon, 
Mich. 

THOMAS B. MULHERN, L. U. 794, Leominster, 
Mass. 

HENRY MUNCK, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

JOSEPH NIEMCZYK, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 

THURE NORDGREN, L. U. 488, New York, 
N. Y. 

CHARLES J. O'CONNOR, L. U. 132, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

L. OLAERTS, L. U. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. 

PETER OLSHEWSKY, L. U. 51, Boston, Mass. 

DAVID PATTON, L. U. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. B. PENNY, Sr., L. U. 213, Houston, Tex. 

DANIEL REED, L. U. 1138, Toledo, Ohio 

PAUL REID, L. U. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 

FRANK RIDDLE, L. U. 335, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

W. M. ROBERTSON, L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 

JOSEPH ROSS, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 

NICHOLAS RUDI, L. U. 1050, Philadelphia, Pa. 

HUGO SANTORA, L. U. 1230, Franklin, Mass. 

WM. J. SASS, L. U. 916, Aurora, 111. 

GEORGE SCHALK, L. U. 824, Muskegon, Mich. 

PAUL W. SCHMIDT, L. U. 1260, Iowa City, la. 

PHILIP SCHREINER, L. U. 60, IndUnapolis,; 
Ind. 

JOSEPH SHAW, L. U. 2163, New York, N. Y. 

FRED STERLING, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 

CHARLES STEVENS, L. U. 1441, Canonsburg, 
Pa. * 

R. P. STIVERS, L. U. 25, Los Angeles, Cal. i 

GEORGE S. TUCKER, L. U. 1130, Titusville, Pauf 

H. L. VANDERGRIFF, L. U. 226, Portland, Ore^.i 

CHISBERT VERHASSELT, L. U. 325, Paterson,' 
N. J. 

HAROLD VERNER, L. U. 419, Chicago, 111. . 

ELI H. WAKELEE, L. U. 127, Derby, Conn. 

C. L. WARD, L. U. 61, Kansas City, Mo. 

GEORGE J. WEBER, L. U. 1307, Evanston, HI. 

PHILIP WENZ, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 

E. J. WHITLOCK, SR., L. U. 388, Richmond, 
Va. 

HOWARD A. WIGGINS, 213, Houston, Tex. 

L. G. WILLIAMS, L. U. 1723, Columbus, Ga. 



THE CARPENTER 

ANSWERS TO "THE LOCKER" 



S3 



1. 


True. 


2. 


True. 


3. 


True. 


4. 


True. 


5. 


True. 


6. 


False. 


7. 


False. 


8. 


False. 


9. 


False. 


10. 


False. 


11. 


True. 


12. 


False. 


13. 


True. 


14. 


True. 


15. 


True. 


16. 


False. 


17. 


True. 


18. 


True. 


19. 


True. 


20. 


False. 


21. 


True. 


22. 


False. 


23. 


True. 


24. 


True. 


25. 


True. 



Used to mark for butt hinges. 

The trade name is SKILSAW. 

Usually rabbeted on outer edge. 

Sheathing nailed on battens. 

Pine is resinous. 

Never more than half the length. 

They help you lift the sash. 

Straight cuts only. 

Strap hinges are longer than T's. 

It is 3%. inches long. 

What! No plastic? 

They run at right angles. 

It is the central, spongy part. 

As when boards are glued together. 

It is the simplest joint. 

It is the outer vertical part. 

Ver>' much wider. 

Technically it is the cross-bar. 

The finish floor goes on top of it. 

A No. 13 bit drills a 13/16" hole. 

It is the front edge of the tread. 

It has eight sides. 

Also called a batten. 

Seen any lately? 

On the face. Called a fire cut. 



26. 


False. 


27. 


True. 


28. 


False. 


29. 


False. 


30. 


False. 


31. 


True. 


32. 


True. 


33. 


False. 


34. 


False. 


35. 


True. 


36. 


False. 


37. 


False. 


38. 


True. 


39. 


False. 


40. 


False. 


41. 


False. 


42. 


True. 


43. 


True. 


44. 


False. 


45. 


True. 


46. 


False. 


47. 


False. 


48. 


True. 


49. 


True. 


50. 


True. 



No disputing that. 

A V-shaped design. 

A pilaster is usually flat. 

Used in concrete forms. 

It goes over the window. 

The head projects. 

It is the convex edge. 

From a needle leaf tree. 

Round heads, square necks. 

It ought to be. 

Round edge up (the crown). 

Used lajang cut foundations. 

Clockwise. 

A mullion is vertical. 

It is iron, concrete filled. 

Usually used on doors. 

^^'e^'e heard it called boxing. 

Birch also. 

It is a wall projection. 

But not often enough. 

Not around this way. 

None that we ever saw. 

The under side. 

If you don't cut them short. 

Tell that to the plasterers. 



NOTE: This true or false method seems an unreliable test. To check on this theory a 
coin was tossed to arrive at the answers. Heads it's true. Tails it's false. Using this system 
105 of 200 questions were marked right. This is a percentage of 52 plus. Which indicates 
that any person with absolutely no knowledge whatsoever of carpentry could answer half 
the questions correctly. With the help of Lady Luck and a rabbit's foot this could be upped 
to 75 % . Of course there is a practical test also. But if by guess works in one case, by 
golly might work in the other. 



LOCAL 1625 GETS PAT ON BACK 

The Editor: 

This is my way of sa>'ing we Campfire Guardians of Prineville think the Carpenters of 
Local 1625 are a swell bunch of fellows. 

When the call for individual group sponsors was given they were the first to take a 

group (and, of course, I was the lucky one, it was 
my group). 

As a sponsor, they give a campsliip each year 
to the girl I feel most worthy, give transportation, 
or any other assistance they are asked to do to 
help my Group of 16 girls. 

When the need arose for storage cabinets for 
each group, I was asked if I thought my sponsors 
would help build them for all the groups. Did 
Local Union No. 1625 turn out the goods? \^"ell, 
we now have 2 cabinets, and I am surely proud 
to have them as my sponsor. When they finished, 
my group's mothers and I ser\'ed them pie and 
coffee. 
I am enclosing a snap I took of a few of the fellows, hope you can find room to print it 
in "The Carpenter" to show the boys of Local 1625 I mean it when I say thanks. 
I Sincerely, Mrs. Herbert Post, Guardian of tlie Chesk Cha May 

\ Camp Fire Group. 




CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

LABOR ACCORDS HIGH HONORS TO JAKE KALLER 

Surrounded by his wife and family, a 71-year-old carpenter who has devoted the greater 
share of his life to unionism was accorded high honors December 17th by the Detroit 
labor movement. 

Jake Kaller, revered business agent of Carpenters Local 1518, was guest of honor at a 
fete sponsored by his union and attended by local and national luminaries. 

Speakers who paid tribute to the labor patriarch included Frank X. Martel, Sr., 
president of the Detroit and Wayne County Federation of Labor; C. C. Van Horn, 
general representative of the Carpenters' International Union; Vern Lough, secretary 
of the Carpenters' District Council, and Joseph Katz, president of Local 1513. 

Finlay Allan, secretary of the Building Trades Council, served as master of ceremonies 
for tlie event, which was staged at Mayfair Caterers. 
Some 350 guests attended. 

Clustered about Kaller at the head table were his wife, Clara, his seven step- 
children and two of his sons, Cye of Chicago and William of Glendale, Calif. A 
third son, Charles, of Tuscon, Ariz., who was unable to attend, was one of the some 
35 persons who sent telegrams of congratulations on the occasion. 

Kaller was presented a pen and pencil set by the Carpenters' District Council, a dia- 
mond ring by his family and a gift of cash by his local. He expressed his appreciation 
amid enthusiastic bursts of applause. 

The Local 1513 B. A. has been active in the labor movement for nearly 40 years. 

He was one of the pioneer organizers in the Detroit labor movement, assuming a r 
prominent role in blazing a trial through the wilderness of open shop and anti-labor drives | 
that confronted unionism in the early part of the century. 



A TIMELESS CHRISTMAS STORY 

March is a little late to be telling Christ- 
mas stories. Yet there is a Christmas story 
from Riverton, Wyoming, that is so heart- 
warming and so cheering that it is timeless. 
Newspapers and radio stations from coast to 
coast and in several foreign countries as well 
have carried it. 

Two weeks before Christmas, the home of 
the Rufus Montgomery family, which lives on 
the reclamation project northeast of Riverton, 
was completely destroyed by fire. Everything 
they owned went up in smoke. No one ever 
faced a more dismal Yuletide than did the 
Rufus Montgomery family. However, it was not dismal for long. The local radio station 
started a campaign to get the family under a roof by December 25th. Local Union No. 1763, 
responded enthusiastically, as did much of the cotmtry. In a short while some $10,000 was 
raised. Working in bitter cold, members of the union doggedly plugged away at getting the 
new house up. In eight days the job was completed and the family moved in before 
Christmas— thanks to the generosity and neighborliness of the good people of Fremont 
County, and the public spiritedness of the members of Local 1763. 

The people of the county are now raising a disaster fund to take care of such emer- 
gencies in the future. 




THE CARPENTER 



35 



SON INSTALLS FATHER 

Members of Local Union No. 248, Toledo, who were in attendance at tlie January 3rd 
meeting witnessed a somewhat unusual scene. At that meeting, O. C. Meinka, secretary of 
tlie Maumee Valley District Council, had tlie rare pri\ilege of installing his father as 
president of Local Union No. 248. Fathers have often installed their sons as officers of 
various local unions or councils but tlie instances in which sons have re\ersed the process 
are few and far between. 

A. L. Meinka, tlie father, has been a member of Local Union 248 since it was chartered 
in 1941 and has rarely missed a meeting. Between them the Meinka's make a great tmion 
team. « 

LOCAL UNION No. 595 IS PROUD OF GREAT OLD TIMER 

Local Union No. 595, Lynn Massachusetts, is proud of its "Grand Old Man". He is 
ninety-seven year old George H. Murray who is still actively interested in the activities 
of Ills union. Bom on Prince Edward Island, Canada, of Scotch stock on January 17, 1853, 
Brotlier Murray moved to the United States at an early age. In 1889 he joined Local 
Union No. 108 at Lynn. Later this local consolidated with Local 688 to become 1041. 
A few years later, locals in Saugus and Nahant also consolidated w^ith 1041 to form Local 
Union No. 595 which has carried on ever since. 

In his union career, Brotlier Murray has served as president of his local for eight years 
and recording secretary for twenty years. Despite his greatly advanced age, he still attends 
meetings whenever health permits him. For a number of years he has acted as installing 
oflBcer following e\'ery election. All through his union career he has been an able and 
wiUing worker for anything that helped tlie union; consequently the entire membership 
of Local Union No. 595 holds him in tlie highest esteem. 



THE DALLES LOCAL GETS DESERVED PAT ON BACK 

Recently the citizens of The Dalles, Oregon, read the following editorial in their local 
P^P^r- SHINING DEED 

It wasn't much of a job for 
the carpenters and painters, 
but it meant a lot to Dow and 
Mary Ackley when these men 
repaired the broken house at 
Rowena. 

The house was the one which 
was struck by a skidding car 
a week before Christmas, 1949. 
The front part of the house was 
torn open. Snow piled into 
what had been the best room. 
It was closed off, of course, dur- 
ing the cold weather but the 
house was draftier than before 
and elderly Dow and Mary had 
trouble keeping warm during 
the bitter cold spell. 
The movement to put the Ackley home back in "good-as-new" condition started in 
the local carpenters' union. It is a tribute to the members of that union that the project 
was begun and that their spirit was such as to inspire others to participate. 

It was that sort of community effort, enterprise and kind-heartedness that adds up to 
a shining good deed in a world that is often too much absorbed in conflict or material 
things to pay much attention to elderly folks who live by the side of the road. 

In those glowing words the paper paid tribute to the pubhc spiritedness of tlie officers 
and members of Local Union No. 1896 who were largely responsible for tlie rebuilding 
of the Ackley home. Aerie 2126 of the Eagles and Local Union No. 1126 of tlie Painters 
caught the spirit of the occasion and tlirough contributions from the former and \oluntar>' 
labor by the latter, the project was finished in jig time. By their cooperative efforts life 
was made considerably better for the old and honorable couple. 




36 THE CARPENTER 

NEWARK LOCAL HONORS OLD TIMERS 

Essex House, Broad Street, Newark, N. J., was the scene of a happy occasion on tlie 
night of January 29th when Local Union No. 306, Newark, paid high tribute, in the form 
of a testimonial dinner, to retiring financial secretary John Manion and the sixty-six pen- 
sioned members of the Union. A large throng was on hand to make the evening a great 
success. Good food, fine speaking and a true feeling of brotherhood combined to make the 
evening one that will not soon be forgotten. 

Brother John Manion served Local Union 306 as financial secretary for the past twenty- 
two years. During that time he has faithfully served the interest of his Union and helped 




in every way he could to promote the lot of all nn n v.ho v oik fdi ,i li^ nig with their hands 
and brains. Only failing health could induce him to resign the office he has filled so capably 
for so long. Brother Manion has reached the respectable age of eighty-two. 

Special guests at the dinner were the two oldest pensioned members from the seven 
other locals in Essex County and their wives. With so many grand old timers present many 
pleasant memories of the old days were relived. 

• 

SAYVILLE LOCAL CELEBRATES 50th BIRTHDAY 

Members and wives of Local Union No. 412, Say^'ille, N. Y. celebrated the Fiftieth 
Anniversary of their union's founding on November 18, 1949, with a Dinner Dance at 
Kelly's Restaurant. 

Honored guests of the evening were Brother John O'Donnell, Representative of the 
General,. Office; Brother Paul Blydenburg, President of the South Shore District Council; 
and Brother Edward Murtha, Business Agent of South Shore District Council. 

After a wonderful turkey dinner. Brother William Steenland, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the South Shore District Council and Chainnan of the Dinner Committee, introduced 
the guests of the evening. Brother John O'Donnell offered an educational address on 
the trials and tribulations of the United Brotherhood from its origin to the present, also on 
the activities at the General Office. After the address Brother O'Donnell presented a 
Fifty Year Pin to Charter Member Brother Carl L. Bahr. Gifts were also presented to 
Brothers Leendert Kwaak, Financial Secretary; Thomas C. Jenkins, Treasurer; and Joseph 
L. Weigel, Recording Secretary; all of whom have served the Local in tlieir respective 
offices for twenty-five years or more. 

After Brother O'Donnell's address there was a wonderful floor show which was put 
over under the supervision of a Brother from Patchoque Local, Master of Ceremonies 
Pat Sullivan. Dancing followed after the floor show. 

All in all, everybody had a wonderful time. 

• 

LOCAL UNION No. 461 JOINS "GOLDEN CIRCLE" 

To the distinguished list of Brotherhood locals which have completed fifty years of con- 
tinuous service must be added the name of Local Union 461, Highland Park, 111. Organized 
right after the turn of the century, Local Union No. 461 on January 21st of this year cele- 
brated its fiftieth birthday with a fine dinner and social evening at the Labor Temple in 
Highland Park. A large turnout was on hand to enjoy the festivities. 

Stanley Johnson, secretary-treasurer of the Chicago District Council, acted as master of 
ceremonies. Speaker of the evening was John R. Stevenson, Second General Vice-President, 
whose career in the Illinois labor movement extends back over many, many years. Other 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



special guests included Asgar Andmp, vice-president of the Chicago District Council; Ted 
Kenney and Charles Thompson, business ^epresentati^•es of the Council, and Jack Shaw, 
president of the Lake County Building Trades Council. 

A great floor show composed of many of the finest acts in the business rounded out the 
entertainment, following which the Casino Boys furnished toe-tickling music for dancing. 
The party lasted well into the night and the concensus of opinion was that it was one of the 
best parties in a long time. « 



LOCAL 133 PRESENTS CERTIFICATE 
OF COMPLETION 

Leo Davis, first carpenter apprentice to 
complete his apprenticeship under the appren- 
ticeship program administered jointly by the 
Associated General Contractors and Local 
Union No. 133, is presented a certificate from 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America by International Repre- 
sentative, C. A. Shuey, and a certificate from 
the Federal Committee on Apprenticeship, 
U. S. Department of Labor, by E. J. Wilson, 
Field Representative, Bureau of Apprentice- 
ship, U. S. Department of Labor, at a special 
meeting of Local Union No. 133 held on 
December 29, 1949, Terre Haute, Indiana. 




First row, left to right, E. J. Wilson, Leo 
Davis, C. A. Shuey. 

Rear row, left to right, Ralph Hawkins, Fred 
Mason, Charles Richardson, and Walter Wag- 
ner, members of the apprenticeship commit- 
tee of Carpenters Local No. 133. 



AT UNION CITY'S 50TH BIRTHDAY PARTY 




Pictured above, helping Local Union No. 299, Union Cit>', N. J., celebrate its Golden 
Anniversary are: Business agent A. Beck, Hudson County; General Representative R. 
Rajoppi; charter members J. Guyer and J. Truncillito; F. McAndrews, chairman of the 
committee; and business agent H. Cook, Hudson County. 

Middle row: T. Bifano, delegate to the District Council; R. Stanton, vice-president; 
Val. Hitchler, trustee; A. J. White, financial secretary; H. Maisch, trustee; and Wm. 
Grueninger, treasurer. 

Seated: B. Mattiello, trustee; A. Jacobson, conductor; E. Jacobson, delegate to the 
District Council; H. E. Nelson, recording secretary; T. Teetsel, president; and H. Galmich, 
delegate to the District Council. 




OMAH.\ AUXILL\EY ROUNDS OUT 18 ACTRT YEARS 

The Editor: 

Ladies Auxiliar>^ Xo. 250 Omaha, Xebraska. sends greetings to Sister AuxiUaries. 

The Carpenters bought a building and remodeled it for offices and meeting halls. So 
we took o^•er furnishing the kitchen and as this \\ould take quite a sum of money we so- 
licited advertising for a dedication book. Besides paying all expenses connected with the 
project we were able to purchase a gas sto%"e, Frigidaire, enough dishes and sih^er to 
seT\^e a hundred, and necessary kitchen utensils. 

We celebrate our 18th anniversarv' March 6th so are having a pot luck supper March 
4tli for members, husbands and invited guests. We will use our new equipment for 
tlie first time. 

We are planning a dedication and dinner around the first of April, ^^'e have about 
200 members; four are charter members. One of tlie charter members is our President, 
Mrs. Ben Bachmann. 

We are charter members of tlie State Council of Carpenters, affiliated with the State 
Federation of Labor, also Union Label League and Labor's League for Political Education. 

Camille Butler 
« Press Correspondent 

WILLOWS AUXILL\RY YOUNG BUT ACTRE 

The Editor: 

Hello to all our Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary Xo. 537 of \Mllows, Calif. 

We are just a small group not yet a year old but we are planning for more members 
as time goes by. 

We meet the first and third Tuesday of each month, sewing refreshments once each 
montli. 

In September, we had a picnic; in Xovember, we held a Thanksgiving dinner diat was 
well attended by the Carpenters and tlieir famiUes. At Christmas, we had refreshments and 
an exchange of gifts. 

We have earned money by selling chances, holding white elephant auctions and grab 
bags. We plan now to make a set of dish towels to be auctioned oflF and plan later on 
making a few quilts. 

We would like to hear from other Sister Auxiliaries and exchange letters and ideas. 

Fraternally, 

Ina Cossins, Recording Secretary. 



BREMERTON LADIES SPONSOR DRILL TEAM 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliarj' X'o. 283 of Bremerton, \\'ash., sends friendly greetings to all Sister 
AuxiUaries. 

We are now starting tlie year 1950 with several ways of increasing our funds. We have 
social meetings at our homes and on April 1st we plan a carni\'al with a bake goods sale, 
fancy work and ruumiage sale. Refreshments will be sensed. On December 15, we had our 
Cliristnias party, widi our husbands joining us for the social hour and the gift exchange. At 
that time, we each revealed tlie name of our secret sister. 

We ha\e a Sunsliine committee and send cards and flowers to tiie sick. 

Right now, we are busy practicing our drill team and making plans for the Convention. 

Fraternally, 

Ahce Jolmson, Recording Secretary. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 



By H. H. Siegele 
LESSON 259 

Sheeting and Plancier Bevels.— While the 
sheeting bevels for ordinary roofs are rare- 
ly marked with the square, there are times 
when tliis must be done. This is especially 
true on roofs tliat must have a perfectly 
straight hip line. It is also true with planci-. 
ers, which must have a perfectly straight 
hip line. It is also true with planciers, which 
must be cut to fit, and on hopper work of all 
kinds— for hoppers and hip roofs are framed 
on tlie same principle, but in reverse order. 

Hip Roof.— Fig. 1, to tlie upper left, shows 
an elevation of a rafter flat hip roof. Di- 
rectly under it is shown a roof plan, which is 
28 feet by 28 feet, with a 4x4-foot deck. To 
the right, by dotted lines, is shown the same 
size plan of tlie counter roof, a sort of imag- 
inap.' roof. The shaded and dotted-line 




CouTiler Raof / 

^N Plan y 



: Fig. 1 

squares indicate that the angles of these 
Dlans are perfect right angles, which is 
lecessary to make any hip roof framing 
vork out right. 

The Counter Pitch.— Fig. 2 shows how tlie 
; counter roof plan, or rather, the counter 
,ntch, as shown in tliis diagram is obtained, 
iere the shaded square is in position for 
aying out the counter pitch, directly under 
I he roof, which is shown by dotted hnes. 
Co bring this up in line with the roof shown 
the left, set the compass at the heel of tlie 
quare, or point c, and witli it swing point a 
round to point b, bring with it the hopper- 
haped outline, as shown. The dotted-line 
quare shows tliat tlie pitch in this position 



would have the same relationship to the 
pitch of the real roof as it had before, but 
in reverse order. 

Obtaining Points for Bevels.— Fig. 3, to 
the left, shows a cross section of the roof 
shown in Fig. 2, What we want to find is 







\ 



' , <— Counter Pikch --' \ \ 



Fig. 2 

the points for marking the face be\'el for the 
sheeting. To do this, transfer the rafter 
length, c-a, to c-b, as shown by the dotted 
part-circle. Then apply the square in the 
position shown. Now to get the face bevel 
for the sheeting take the rafter length on 
the blade and the tangent on the tongue— 
the tangent gives the bevel. The process is 




exactly the same on die counter pitch roof, 
shown to tlie right. The rafter lengtli and 
the tangent, as shown, will give the face 
bevel of the sheeting. For the edge bevel 
of the sheeting for tlie roof to the left, take 
the face bevel of the sheeting for the roof 
to the right, or vice versa. 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



Bevels for Jacks and Sheeting.— Fig. 4 

shows the flat hip roof shown in pre\"ious 
diagrams, as if it were separated at the hips 
and flattened out on a level floor. The two 
squares shown here are applied with the 
rafter length and the tangent shown in the 
diagram to the left in Fig. 3. The square 
to the left is applied to a sheeting board 
for marking the face be%-el— the tangent giv- 




ing the bevel. The same points are used on 
the square shown to the right, for marking 
the edge bevel of the jack rafters, but the 
rafter length, not the tangent, gives the 
bevei. The sheeting board cut to the proper 
be\eis is shown to the extreme left. 

Fig. 5 shows the counter pitch roof (two 
sides in part) flattened out. The square to 
the left is applied to a sheeting board, using 
the rafter length and the tangent, shown to 
the right in Fig. 3. The tangent, again, 
gives the face bevel for the sheathing. The 
same rafter length and tangent are used in 
applying the square to the right, for marking 
the edge bevel of the jack rafter, but the 




rafter length, not the tangent, gives the 
bevel. 

The upper drawing of Fig. 6 shows the 
square applied to a sheeting board for 
marking die face bevel. This apphcation, 



in reverse order, is the same as the om 
shown to the left in Fig. 4. The bottorr 
drawing shows the square applied to marl 
the edge bevel of the sheeting board. Thii 
application, in reverse order, is the same aj 




the one shown to the left in Fig. 5. Stud} 
and compare Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6. 

Cuts for Sheeting and Plancier.— Th( 

upper drawing of Fig. 7 shows a cross sec- 
tion of the counter pitch roof shown ir 




Fig. 7 

Figs. 2 and 3, at a little larger scale. Ir 
this drawing the roof is shown with a cor- 
nice and a plancier board. The inside of 
the roof is shown hned with boards. Now 
the bevels for the hning and for the plan- 
cier boards are exactly the same as those 
for the sheeting, shown in Fig. 5. The cen- 
ter drawing. Fig. 7, shows the square, num- 
bered 5, appHed to a plancier board foi 
marking the face bevel, which in reverse 
order is the same as the application shown 
for the face bevel of the sheeting in Fig 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



5. The bottom drawing shows the square, 
numbered 4, applied for marking the edge 
bevel of the plancier board, which in re- 
verse order, is the same as the application 
shown in Fig. 4, for marking the face bevel 
of the sheeting. It should be remembered 
here, that the face bevel of the sheeting 
for one roof is the edge bevel of the sheet- 
ing for the other roof, or vice versa. 

Face and edge Bevels of Sheeting.— Why 
tlie face bevel of the sheeting for any hip 
roof is the same as the edge bevel of the 
sheeting for the counter roof, or vice versa, 



Side Surface. 




Ceuntar Hoof- 



Fig. 8 



is illustrated by Fig. 8. Here the low pitch 
roof has the sheeting on in the regular way, 
but the counter pitch roof, to bring out the 
point, has the sheeting on edgewise. Now if 
the sheeting were put on the low pitch roof 
as shown, and on the counter pitch roof also 
as shown, then the edges of the boards in 
both roofs would have the same bevel— the 
face bevel of the boards would also be the 
same in both roofs. Therefore, if the sheet- 



V 



\ 



\ \ o Bun <^ 




O -j^i)^ 



Fig. 9 



ing is put on in the regular way on both 
roofs, the face bevel of one roof, speaking 
of the sheeting, would become the edge 
bevel of the other. 

Butt Joint of Sheeting.— Fig. 9 shows a 
diagram of the roof and coimter roof that 
has been used throughout this lesson, illus- 
trating how to get the edge bevel of sheet- 
ing for a butt joint. The tongue of the 



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square here is applied to the counter pitch 
of the common rafter, from the comb down 
toward the base hne, rather than from the 
toe of the rafter, as in the other cases. In 
this instance the counter pitch from c to o, 
becomes the rafter length, as shown. The 
run, a-b, is raised to the level of the top 
of the common rafter, d-c, and then witli a 
compass transferred to point e on the blade 
of the square, as shown by tlie dotted part- 
circle, which becomes the tangent. Now the 
tangent and the rafter length will give the 
edge bevel for the butt joint— the tangent 
gives the bevel. (The reference letters in 
both the pitch and the counter pitch, refer, 
relatively, to the same points, hence the ex- 
planation will apply to both pitches. It 
should also be mentioned that the tangent 
shown in the diagram for the counter pitch 
roof, runs through the diagram of the origi- 
nal roof. This was done to save space.) 



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FILING 
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Minnoapolit 16, Minn. 



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The handiest liiile devices you ever 
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Money back if not satisfied 

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P. O. Box 278C 
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BURR HAND SAW FILER 



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8945 VENICE BOULEVARD 
lOS ANCEIES 34, C A 1 1 F. 




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Carlson Steel Tape Rules 



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MONROVIA, CALIFORNIA 



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City Zone 

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SAVE A DAY 



ELIASON STAIR GAUGE 

1. Measures tread or riser 

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2. Marks board for perfect fit 
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Dealers and Agents Wanted 

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Knocks down in three sections 26' 
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STAPLE— to save time- 
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r-32 Gun Tacker 

\ many purpose tool replacing hammer and tacks 
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Radial Saw Chart for changing pitches and cuts 
into degrees and minutes. Every carpenter should 
ive this chart. Now printed on both sides, makes about 
) square feet of printed data showing squares full size, 
rice $1.00 postpaid, no stamps. 



SLIDE CAIX^ULrATOR for Rafters 



Makes figuring rafters a cinch! Shows the length of any 
rafter having a run of from 2 to 23 feet: longer lengths are 
found by doubling. Covers 17 different pitches. Shows lengths 
of hips and valleys, commons, jacks, and gives the cuts for 
each pitch, also the angle in degrees and minutes. Fastest 
method known, eliminates chance of error, so simple anyone 
who can read numbers can use it. NOT A SLIDE RULE but 
a Slide Calculator designed especially for Carpenters. Con- 
tractors and Architects. Thousands in use. Price $3.90 
postpaid. Check or M. 0., no stamps. 



2103 



MASON ENGINEERING SERVICE 

N. Burdick St., Dept. 3, Kalamazoo 81, 



Mich. 



MOW 



I Earn Better Pay This Easy Way 



CARPENTRY 
ESTIMATING 

...QUICK.. .EASY.. .ACCURATE 

with this simplified guide! 

You can earn higher pay when you know how 
to estimate. Here is everything you need to 
know to "take off" a bill of materials from set 
of plans and specifications for a frame house. 
Saves you time figuring jobs, protects you 
against oversights or mistakes that waste 
materials and cost money. Nothing compli- 
cated — just use simple arithmetic to do house 
carpentry estimating with this easy-to-use ready 
reference handbook. 

SIMPLIFIED 
CARPENTRY ESTIMATING 

Shows you, step by step, how to figure mate- 
rials needed for (1) foundation, (2) framing, 
(3) exterior finish, (4) interior finish, (5) 
hardware, and (6) stairs. Gives definite "take- 
off"' rules, with many quick-reference tables and 
short-cut methods that simplify the work. 

CDCriAl CCATIIDPCa Lumber Checking List, lllll- 
OrCUIHL rCHIUnCO. ^-ork Checking List. Hard- 
ware Checking List. Materials Ordering Information. Quick- 
Figuring Tables for estimating concrete footings and walls, 
concrete piers, window frames, door and window areas, 
sash weights, nail Quantities. How to figure labor hours 
per unit of work. Rules for linear, area and volume 
measurement. Mathematical reference tables, including dec- 
imal equivalents, lumber reckoner, conversion of weights and 
measures, etc. Xew chapter, "How to Plan a House," gives 
useful data for contractors and material dealers. 

TIIDIi TA I^UADTITD Q "'hen you receive this book, 
lUnn lU bnHrlLK O, and see the "Estimating 
Short Cuts" j'ou can use for quick figuring of board foot- 
age. Here are simplified ways to estimate lumber needed 
for floors, walls, ceilings, roof, door and window frames, 
inside trim for these frames, inside trim for inside doors, 
and drawers and cabinets. This chapter alone can be Worth 
the entire price of the book to you! 

Send No Money 

EXAMINE 10 DAYS FREE 

Just fill in and mail cou- 
pon below to get "Sim- 
plified Carpentry Esti- 
mating" for 10 DATS 
FREE TRLiL. It not 
fully satisfied, return the 
book and owe nothing. If 
you keep it, send only 
$3.50 plus few cents post- 
age in full payment. You 
take no risk. Mail cou- 
pon now. 



MAIL THIS COUPON 



SIMMONS-BOARDMAN Publishing Corp. 'Carp. 4-30) 
30 Church Street, New York 7, N. Y. 

Send me for 10 DATS FREE TRIAL. "Simpli- 
fied Carpentry Estimating." I will either return 
it in 10 days and owe nothing, or send only $3.50 
(plus shippir.s rh.irges) in full payment. 




I Ci 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 

Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

The American Floor Surfacing 

Machine Co., Toledo, Ohio 2nd Cover 

Arrow Fastener Co. Inc., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 45 

Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 43 

Carlson & Sullivan, Inc., Mon- 
rovia, Cal. 43 

Eagle Rule Mfg. Corp., New York, 

N. Y. 45 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 44 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 47 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 48 

Charles H. Graff, Fort Worth, 

Texas 44 

Heston & Anderson, Fairfield, 

Iowa 6 

The Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 47 

A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 42 

North Bros., Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 44 

Sandvik Saw & Tool Corp., New 

York, N. Y. 44 

J. H. Scharf Mfg. Co., Omaha, 

Nebr. 42 

Sharps Mfg. Co., Salem, Ore 43 

Speedcor Products, Portland, Ore. 48 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn. 3rd Cover 

Strait-Line-Products, Santa Ana, 

Cal. 45 

Welliver & Sons, Rockford, I1I.__ 42 

Woodmark Industries, Inc., Minn- 
eapolis, Minn. 42 

A. Zapart, Saw^ Filer, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 42 

Carpentry Materials 

The Celotex Corp., Chicago, in._ 1 
The Franklin Glue Co., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 4 

The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._ 5 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City, Ind. 4th Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Builder, New York, 

N. Y. 43 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 47 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kauis 41 

Mason Engineering Service, Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. 45 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y 46 

Tamblyn System, Denver, CoIo._ 48 

Wearing Apparel 

The H. D. Lee Co., Kansas 

City, Mo. 3rd Cover 





Markings 
That Are Durable 



NEW MEASURING EASE 
FAMOUS MEZURALL 
WIZARD, JR. TAPE 
WITH CHROME-CLAD 
BLADES! 

CHECK THESE 
OUTSTANDING FEATURES 

1— Exclusive liU/fc/n Chrome-Clad satin finish blades. 
2— Black markings razor-sharp against chrome white 

background. 
3— Rust and corrosion resistant. 
4^Will not crack, chip, or peel. 
3— Self-adjusting hook permits accurate butt-end 

and hook-over measuring. 
6 — Replaceable blades. 
7 — Smooth manual blade operation. 
8— Improved heavily plated cases, 

ASK FOR THEA1 BY NAME— ASK FOR A MSZUkAU 
OR WIZARD, JR. CHROME - CLAD TAPE-RULE 

gW lUFKIN 

THE LUFKIN RULE CO. • TAPES • RULES • PRECISION TOOLS 
SAEINAW, MICHIGAN • NEW YORK CITY • BARRIE, ONTARIO 



QBIG BUILDING BOOKS 



Edition for 
EXAMINATION 

SEND NO MONEY 

Leam to draw plant, eetlmate, be a live-wire builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 9 practical, pro- 
fusely Illustrated books cover subjects that will help yoo 
to get more work and make more money. Masonry, con- 
crete forms, carpentry, steel square, roof framing, construc- 
tion, plumbing, heating, painting, decorating and many 
other subjects. More than 4000 pages — 2750 Illustrations. 

UP-TO-DATE 

EDITION 

These books are 
the most up-to- 
date and complete 
we have ever pub- 
lished on tbeg* 
many subjects. 
Examination 



BETTER JOBS - BEHER PAY 

A nationwide building boom is in full 
swing and trained men are needed. 
Big opportunities are always for MEN 
V\'HO KNOW HOW. These books sup- 
ply quick, easily understood training and 
handy, permanent reference Information 
that helps solve building problems. 

Coupon Brings Nine Big Books For 



AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY Publishers since 1898 

Dept. G-436 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 
Tou may ship me the Tp-to-Date edition of your ntn« 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery chargel 
only, and if fully satisfied In ten days, I will send yoo 
$2.00, and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 Is paid. I am not obligated In tny 
way unless I keep the books. 



Name „ 

City state 

Attach letter statins sse, occupation, employer*! name and 
address, and name and address of at least one buslneu 
man as reference. Men In service, also give home addreii. 



BOtt 




^^ HANG THAT DOOR 
THE PROFESSIONAL WAY! 



Mates a clean-cut, deeply- etched profile on door. 
Remove chips. Repeat operation on jamb. Hang 
door! No adjustments. No fussing. Precision made. 
Drop-forged, heat-treated steel. Comes in 3". 3J" 
and 4" (Std) sizes, 

ONLY 11.75 ea.— $3.50 a pair 
(any two) — §5.25 complete set 
of three. If dealer can't supply, 
send only $1.00 with order and 
pav postman balance plus post- 
age C. 0. D. In Canada, .25c 
higher per order. No C. O. D. 
State sizes wanted. 



USERS PRAISE 
HIGHLY 

"ReaUy a help for the 
'old bands' and almost 
a 'must' for the new 
boys." 

S. H. Glover 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

"The greatest help in 

hanging doors I have 
ever seen." 

J. Allen Charles 

Mullins, S. C. 



Comes With 
Leatherette case 



Conceded by carpenters to be almost indispensable, 
as hundreds of testimonials in file show. 
("E-Z Mark" Trade Mark Reg.) 



t-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377 Dept. C, Los Angeles 16, Cal. 



E-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377, Dept. C. 
Los Angeles 16, Calif. 

Mark Butt Gauges as checked below: 
Size 



V 

fion 

I 




C/ip and mo// handy order form below. 



'E-Z' 



Gentlemen: Please send the following 
Check 

n one of any size $1.75 

n two of any size $3.50 

G complete set of three any size $5.25 

I enclose check or money order D 

Send C. O. D D 



Name: 

Address: City_ 

State: 



.Zone- 



speBVcon tools i 



IVUC SAVe YOU 
TIME ANPMONEV 






SPEED SAW FILER 

Now file your own saws! Precision fil- 
ing easy without experience. Two sim- 
ple adjustments. Keeps any hand saw 
extra sharp and true cutting. Complete 
With file and ready to use $2.95 



DRILL GRINDER 
Makes old drills cut like new. 
Sharpens 3/32" to I '/a" drills with 
factory accuracy in 30 sees. No ex- 
perience necessary. Use with hand 
or power grinding wheels. $2.95 



SPEED HANDLE 
Holds files, razor blades, taps, drills, 
Allen wrenches, bits etc. Operates 
similar to drill chuck. Precision 
made. Handiest tool in tool box. $1 





SPEED GRIP PLANE 
Precision made, pocket sized plane 
as easy to grip as big one. S'A" 
X I 'A" face. Can't be beat for all 
around fitting and finishing. Blade 
guaranteed to hold edge. $1.95 



SPEED SAW CLAMP 
Grips full length of hand saws — 30 inches. 
Saves time. Attached or released from bench 
in 15 seconds. Lifetime construction. Holds 
entire saw true without vibration. $4.95 



CIRCULAR SAW FILER 
Sharpen circular saws like an j 
expert. Adjustable for any pitch 
or angle. Complete with file and 
mandrels for blades with 'A", 
3A", 13/16" centers. $6.95 



Order Today I Cash with order, prepaid. COD postage extra. Money back Guarantet 



SPEEDCOR PRODUCTS °-K;rKS."" 



$900 

IN SPARE TIME 



7^0^ 

"1 did very well last 
year with my Foley 
equipment, about 950 
saws and 240 lawn 
mowers. In my spare 
time. About $900 for 
me." Left H. Mix. 

Carpenters Make up to $2 or $3 an hour in 

spare time. With a Foley Automatic Saw 
Filer you can file hand, band and circular 
saws better than the most expert hand filer. 
Cash business, no canvassing. No eyestrain, 
no experience needed. 

FREE BOOK 

"INDEPENDENCE AFTER 40" 

shows just how you 
can start at home in 
spare time, with small 
Investment, no g- — 
overhead, — and 1 „ 
develop into a 
full - time repair 
Bhop. Send coupon 
today — no sales- 
man will call. 



SmcC e^ufi^ 7<w FREE BOOK 



FOLEY MFG. CO., 418-0 Foley Bldg., 

Minneapolis 18, Minn. 

Send FREE BOOK — "Independence After 40" 

Name 

Address 




LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss the "Tamblyn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure the cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $8.75 
and pay the balance of $30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and address clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

1115 So. Pearl St., C-40, Denver 10, Colo. 




Works 




with you... 
Makes work easier! 

• Stanley has designed this nail hammer to 
i swing along with you, to jget the job done 
faster, easier. Drop forged head. Pre-shrunk, 
straight grain hickory handle double wedged 
in the head. Stanley Tools, 163 Elm St., 
Ijfew Britain, Conn. 

THE TOOL BOX OF THE WORLD 

[STANLEY] 

Reg. U.S. Pol. Off. 

_ HARDWARE- HAND TOOLS- ELECTRIC tOOLS ■ 



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lee 

• Lee Exclusive 
Tailored Sizes 

• Lee Sturdy 
Fabrics 

• Sanforized 

• Money-Back 
,; Guarantee! 



•World's Larg. 
est Mlakers of 
Union • Made 
Work Clothes! 



CARPENTER'S 
OVERALLS 




AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4 vols. $6 




InsideTrade Inf ormafien 

for Carpenters, Builders, Join- 
ers, Baildinff Mechanics and all 



gressive course for the appren- 
tice and stodent. A practical 
daily helper and Quick Refer- 
ence for the master worker. 
Carpenters everywhere are as- 
iag these Guides as a Helpinc 
Hand to Easier Work. Better 
Work and Better Pay. To get 
this assistance for yours«lf. 
simply finjn and_ 
znail 



nply 611 in and 

lil FREE COUPON below. 



Inside Trade Information On: 

How to use the steel square— How to file and 

set saws — ^How to build furniture — How to use 

a raltre box — How to use the chalt line — How 

to use rules and scales — How to make joints — 

Carpenters arithmetic — Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength of timbers — 

How to set girders and slllsf — How to frame 

houses and roofs— How to estimate costs — How 

to build houses, barns, garages, bimgalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

specifications — How to excavate — How to use 

settings 12, 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to build hoists and scaffolds- skylights — How 

to build stairs — How to put on interior trim — . 

How to hang doors — How to lath — lay floors — How to paint. 

■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■M«MnHM^BMMMBB»MM TOW«™*«»M M »WW » ■*■■»■«•■ 

AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10. N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vols., on 7 days' fre« 
trial. If OK I will remit $1 in 7 days and $1 monthly until $6 Is.paM. 
—Otherwise I will return them. No obligation unless I am satisfied. 

Name - 




Occupation- 



Employed by- 



CAR 




ACLE WEDGE 




COPYRIGHT. l»SO. OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION 



■ I i - -.< 



% Because quality cuts costs, users of The "OVERHEAD DOOR" 
with the Miracle Wedge are assured superior value. Here is 
long lasting service at minimum cost. The best in millwork, the 
best in hardware and all materials, the best in workmanship 
go into this quality door. It is built for residential, commercial, 
Industrial and rural use. Any "OVERHEAD DOOR" may be 
manually or electrically operoted. Be sure the door you specify ^ 

At 

bears the trade mark above — the symbol of superior value 
in doors. 
TRACKS AND HARDWARE OF SALT SPRAY STEEL 



• Etery 'OVERHEAD DOOR" has the 
Miracle Wedge wealherllghf closure which 
wedges lightly, yet opens easily. Tracks 
carrying the door are slanted, allowing it 
to lift upward and roll bock on full-floating, 
ball bearing rollers. The descending door 
dredges tightly against casings and header. 



NATION-WIDE Sales — Installation — Service 

OVERHEAD DOOR CORPORATION • Hartford City, Indiana, U.S.A. 



.MANUFACTURING DIVISIONS 



CIENDAIE. CAIIFOINIA 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA 



DETROIT. MICHIGAM 
rOariAND, OIECON 



HIILSIOE, NEW JERSEY 
lEWISTOWfN, PENNSYLVANIA 



CORTLAND, NEW YORK 
DALUS, TEXAS 




NTER 



FOUNDED 1881 



Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 



MAY, 1950 





And on every cut SKIL Saw balance and power 
make the job easier! 

Try SKIL Saw on the tough cuts. Learn what easy-handling really 
means. Take SKIL Saw with you up on the job. On overhead work SKIL 
Saw's two handles mean safer, more positive control. On the simple cuts, 
SKIL Saw leaves one hand free for materials handling. And SKIL Saw, 
not you, does the work. SKIL Saw's power and durability make it tops 
for all construction sawing. Choose from 9 hard-working models with 
capacities to 4% inches. Ask your SKIL Tool Distributor to demonstrate 
easy-handling SKIL Saw today. 

SKIL products are made only by 

SKILSAW, INC. 

5033 Elslon Ave., Chicago 30, III. 

Factory Branches in Principal Cities 

kn Canada: SKILTOOLS, LTD., 66 Portland St., Toronto, Ont. 



PORTABLE^TOOLS 




9 SKIi. J 
Say* Models 

give you "the right saw for every use 
v/irti blade sizes from 6 to 12 inches. 



Handle Nlore Job Work 

FASTER ' EASIER 



With These 



H&A TOOLS 



BIG 9" H&A Heavy-Duty 
I TILTING ARBOR SAW 

I Hat nearly the capacity of ether 10" models. Capacity 2Vx" 
\ on straight cuts. }Vt" on 45° bevel cuts. 



Use it in your shop or push it from room 
to room on the job.^ It will do all your 
cross-cutting, ripping, bevel-cutting, da- 
doing, mitering, grooving, ploughing, ten- 
oning, rabbeting^ and practically every 
other type of cut. 

Large oversize table handles work up 
to 24" wide. Equipped with fxill length 
rip fence, miter gauge, and many other 
features that save time and lumber. 



Model 2800 

Relit Anywhere on 
Cotter Bote 




The Mhf 6-inth JOINJtR with 




• ^/t'Mch Rabbeting Capacity 

• 60x8'inch Table 

• 37x4'inch Wting, Swiveling Fence 



H&A Model 5860 win do your dress- 
ing work faster and better than any tool of its 
kind ever developed. Its 60-inch table handles ex- 
tra-long stock easily. Its 37-inch fence tilts to 45 
degrees for edging, swivels to 7 degrees for shear 
cutting of grainy woods. Safer, too — with all 
moving parts metal sheathed and guard that moves 
over cutter as fence slides forward. This new 
H&A Jointer now performs operations which 
formerly required larger, more expensive machines. 

See these two H&A Tools at your dealers TOD A Y. 1} he does not have them, write us and we'll 
direct you to a dealer who does in a hurry. Literature and prices mailed without obligation. 



HESTON & ANDERSON 



• 607 W. Kirkwood Street 
Fairfield. Iowa 





TTO^^^NTCR 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Ovmed and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joinera 
of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LXX— No. 5 



INDIANAPOLIS, MAY, 1950 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



Con tents — 



Labor Will Save Democracy 



A noted college professor visualizes the labor movement as the conservative force 
of our day. In its drive for greater security for the working man, organized labor is 
laying the foundation for a stable economy that can and will save democracy, the 
professor concludes after a good deal of study. 



The Military Needs Watching 



12 

Military Brass Hats are creating a very unhealthy situation in many establishments 
under their control by placing enlisted men in jobs which heretofore have been filled by 
civilian craftsmen for generations. With the military constantly seeking to extend its 
control over essentially civilian affairs, there is more at stake in the move than gobs. 



Imports Won't Hurt Us 



18 

In addition to the billions of dollars of tax money which the government has sent 
European nations to help them on their feet, it is now proposed to go one step farther 
by allowing European goods to enter the American market virtually duty free. The 
top labor advisors seem to think these imports will not hurt us. 



, Pensions In Canada 



21 

Although pension programs in industry have a relatively long history in Canada, 
a recent survey shows that the pension plans now in existence are hardly adequate 
for today's conditions. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Editorials 

The Locker 

Official 

In Memoriam 

Correspondence 

To the Ladies 

Craft Problems 



16 

24 
26 

27 
28 
30 
36 
39 



Index to Advertisers 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 



Get the practical training you need 

for PROMOTION, 

INCREASED INCOME 




Prepare now for more pay, greater success. 
Hundreds have quickly advanced to foreman, 
superintendent, inspector, estimator, contrac- 
tor, with this Chicago Tech training in Build- 
ing. Your practical experience aids your suc- 
cess. 

Learn how to lay out and run building jobs, read 
blue prints, estimate building costs, superintend con- 
struction. Practical training with complete blue print 
plans and specifications — same as used by superin- 
tendents and contractors. Over 46 years of experi- 
ence in training practical builders. 



FREE 



Blue Prints 
and Trial Lesson 



FHOROUGH TRAINING IN IBUILDING 

Learn at Home in Your Spare Time 

The successful builder will tell you 
hat the way to the top-pay jobs and 
mccess in Building is to get thorough 
knowledge of blue prints, building con- 
struction and estimating. 

n this Chicago Tech Course, you learn to 
■ead bine prints — the universal language of 
be builder — and understand specifications — 
or all types of buildings. 

?ou learn building construction details : 
oundations, walls, roofs, windows and doors, 
irches, stairs, etc. 

Ton learn how to lay out work and direct 
)uilding jobs from start to finish. You learn 
•0 estimate building costs quick- 
y and accurately. Find out 
aow you can prepare at home 
or the higher-paid jobs in 
3uilding, or your own success- 
ful contracting business. Get the 
"acts about this income-boosting 
Chicago Tech training now. 



Send today for Trial Lesson: "How to Read 
Blue Prints," and set of Blue Print Plans — 
sent to you Free. See for yourself how this 
Chicago Tech course prepares you to earn 
more money, gives you the thorough knowl- 
edge of Building required for the higher-up 
jobs and higher pay. Don't delay. ]Mail the 
coupon today in an envelope or use penny 
postcard. 



MAIL COUPON NOW 



r 



Chicago Technical College 

E-122 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave. 

Chicago 16, 111. 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet : 
"How to Read Bine Prints" with information 
about how I can train at home. 

Name Age 



Address 




CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



I Ask any carpenter who ever worked In the West and he'll tell you . . . 
{ Thers's nothing like a mlm made 



^^« 






The fevortte Carpenter Overall on the 
Pacific Coast for over 25 years, now 
being made avoifabfe throughout the tountry. 
Costs o littJe more, but worth a tot more! 



SffongboW Sfeve 



CARPENTER 
OVERALL 

With Stop-Loss pockets 



Ask your dealer 
for them. If 
unavailable, 
order a pair 
direct. 



High back 
and wide 
suspenders 



2 large Duck 
hip pockets and 



Combination 

Stop-Loss 
pencil and 
safety watch 
pocket on 
dip front bib 



5 compartment' ' 
reinforced Duck 
swinging 
nail pocket 




2 hammer's traps 



Stop-Loss rule 
or pliers pocket 
of Duck 



2 Duck front 
pockets 



Double knees 



BROWNSTEIN-LOUIS COMPANY 

Makers of Stronghold Work Clotliing since 18 97 

1228 SAN JULIAN STREET, LOS ANGELES 15, CALIFORNIA 

Send me pairs Stronghold Union Made Carpenter 

Overalls with Stop-Loss pockets 

In sizes 32 to 42 waist. In sizes 44 to 50 waist, 

length 30 to 34, each length 30 to 34, each 

$4.25 postage paid $4.50 postage paid 

Money-back guarantee if not satisfied. 

Send your exact size ( these are full cut overalls ) and a 

check □ or money order □ for immediate deliver>'. 

SIZE: W'aiit Length 



CITY ZONE 



Nothing can fall 
out of Stop-Loss 
pockets. The patented 
Stop-Loss safety pockets 
on the bib and side of 
leg will prevent loss of 
valuable tools and keep 
your watch from injury. 
These Stop-Loss pockets 
and many other properly 
placed pockets and 
straps give you real help 
on the job. 

(*less fhan 1% residual 
shrinkage. Govt, test.) 



No. 640 Brown 
No. 641 Black 




(OUGH FINISH LEATHER UPPERS on HI-Bruiser to 

4ve more friction, more wear, more safety. 

tiVETEO LACE EYELETS all the way to the top. 

'^o lace-hooks to bend shut. 

lOFT HORSEHIDE TOE gives you a tighter, safer 

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LABOR WILL SAVE DEMOCRACY 

• 

WRITING IN the April issue of "The Reporter" magazine, Frank Tan- 
nenbaum, Cokimbia Uni\ersity professor, xisuahzes the trade union 
mo\'ement as the greatest hope for saving our democratic society 
from the numerous forces presently militating against it. The trade union 
mo\'ement, says Tannenbaum, is the consenati\e force of our time. It is not 
an instrument against society but rather an additional way of organizing so- 
ciet)", not merely as to its labor, but in all of its other forms. \\^hen it comes 
into being in a community, the politics, the economy, the family life, the 
morals, the relationships between men, and the whole social structure are 
modified. Thus the Columbia professor in his article entitled "Union in 1950: 
Not Bread Alone," sees the trade union mo\'ement gradually building a stable 
and lasting economy free from the fluctuations and uncertain factors that have 
made the industrial age a perilous one for many working people. In part, 
Tannenbaum points out in his thought-provoking article: 

"The trade union is the conservative 



force of our time. It is conservative 
because, while endlessly bargaining, 
compromising, and battling for more 
pay, it is pushing to restore certain 
old values — self-respect, fellowship, 
and securit} — that men need in their 
work. These values were largely lost 
after the Industrial Revolution flung 
labor from field to factory, replaced 
the Nillage with the cit>^, and the mas- 
ter craftsman with the modem cor- 
poration. 

"Big industrialism can offer bread, 
or at best cake, but it has proved in- 
adequate to meet the ethical and 
moral needs of men; the union, with 
all of its faults, may yet save the cor- 
poration, and the efficiency that goes 
with it. 

"The unions are building their own 
natural 'society,' their ow^n cohesive 
labor force, which endows its mem- 
bers with a sense that they count, that 
the\- will be helped by their fellows 
in times of hardship. All real societies 
have possessed these values— values 
that give some ethical substance to 



man on his joudney from the cradle 
to the grave. From this point of view, 
the challenge to management by the 
trade union is salutary and hopeful. 
It is the route— perhaps the only one— 
for saving our democratic society, and 
our contemporary industrial system as 
well. In some way, labor must achieve 
a genuine partnership with manage- 
ment and share more and more re- 
sponsibility with it." 

Outlining the growtli of the indus- 
trial revolution, Tannenbaum traces 
the growth of personal insecurity 
with the growth of industrialization. 
Whereas the old time craftsman had 
his employer, who was usually a close 
associate, to turn to in time of need or 
stress, the worker in the industrial era 
could expect little help or sympathy 
from the coi-poration that employed 
him. The onset of industrial progress 
desti-oyed tlie closeness of family 
bonds; it eliminated the cohesi\-eness 
of the \-illage communit>- and the par- 
ish to which the freeholder had al- 
ways turned in time of trouble. It 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



was this great sense of insecurit}' that 
brought the trade union into being. 
Down the }"ears the chief struggle of 
unionism has been to build up a sense 
of security for the individual worker 
in a highly insecure societ}^ This con- 
stant struggle for greater security' is 
the great consen,'ative force in our 
present societ}% Tannenbaum thinks. 
As such, he sees in it the one great 
hope for saving our democratic so- 
ciet}' and free enterprise system under 
which such great progress has been 
made. 

Linking labor's increased demands 
for not only wage increases, but 
greater social securit\^— such as the 
annual wage— with a changing rela- 
tionship between employee and man- 
agement, the author states that there 
is an "ever-increasing sense of inter- 
dependence bet^veen a union and a 
company. It is clear, indeed, that an 
annual wage can only be derived 
from a stable and profitable enter- 
prise, and that it can be regularly 
sustained only if workers assume their 
need of responsibilit)' for keeping the 
enterprise stable and profitable, to 
share with management some of the 
problems and the burdens of impro\- 
ing quality, increasing quantity', and 
cutting costs." 

The President's Fact Finding Board 
activities in the steel dispute of 1949 
suggests, the author continues, "that 
workers ha\'e a \"ery direct and con- 
tinuing stake in the total well-being 
of the industry," if the industry is to 
become the primary source of tlie 
worker's social security. The proposal 
of the Board "which in its implica- 
tions marks a new departure in the 
U. S. mdustrial relations pattern, is 
tliat a new program of social security', 
to be paid for by industr\-, with the 
blessing if not the active support of 
go\ernment, is now to be inaugu- 
rated. In broad outlines, this proposal 
has been adopted b\' the automobile- 



telephone, iiibber and other indus- 
tries, e\en if in modified form." 

Such proposals imply, the autlior 
says, "the identification of the work- 
er's life-long interests with the for- 
tunes of a company or an industrv^ in 
which his lot happens to be cast," as 
not onh' his job, but such benefits as 
medical care, maternit}' and sickness 
insurance, and related benefits are 
also involved. 

Thus, labor will not only be work- 
ing more closely with management, 
but will have an active voice in 
management as union members will 
prosper and be secure only as their 
companies prosper and are secure. 

Peering into the future, Tannen- 
baum sees hopeful signs of a decen- 
tralization of our industrial might; a 
shift from huge cold-blooded corpora- 
tions operating in dht}', crowded 
cities, to smaller plants located in 
clean airy communities closer to na- 
ture. In this respect, he ventures to 
make the following predictions: 

"Our giant plants and congested 
cities, our national industries and na- 
tional unions, all result from the way 
in which we organize our energ}"— of 
hand, brain, and machine. The big, 
centralized, and complex character of 
our economy has been molded by 
our industrial arts and technology. 
But a change in the technological 
basis of the econom}', from the big 
and centralized and complex to the 
small and spreadout and simple, now 
seems very possible. 

"Man}^ signs portend it— the auto- 
mobile, the mechanization of the 
farm, the radio, tele\ision, the com- 
pact new units for generating electric ^ 
power, deep freeze units, and the 
rapid spread of hydroponics (gro%\iii 
of plants witliout soil) and fish farm- 
ing which together make it possible to 
raise food in incredibly small space. 

"Perhaps within a reasonable time 
the industrial unit will be small— em- 



THE CARPENTER 11 

ploying not more than Rve hundred tional and an international market. It 

people. It may well be that a\;ailable would limit the role of the modem 

energy and technology can keep hours corporation and the modern union. It 

of labor short. The local plot of land would fa\'or proprietary ownership, so 

and the local pond could then per- essential to moral and personal iden- 

haps pro\'ide alternative opportunities tity with the ^^'ork done. I would like 

for emplo>'ment. The new diesel en- to confess the hope that this dispensa- 

gines and electric windmills could tion will come to rule the lives of 

furnish electric energy to enable men, and bring to them that sanity 

skilled craftsmen to use power tools and sense of values which they can 

in their homes instead of the factory, find only within small groups about a 

If all this should happen, a \'ery dif- common task, in the parochial com- 

ferent econom}' would emerge. It munity, and in close contact with the 

would reduce the importance of a na- soil." 



New York Council Honors Home Guests 

While conferring with the General Executive Board during its mid-winter 
session in Lakeland, Florida, Charles W. Hanson, president of the New York 
State Council, conceived the idea of sponsoring a dinner for all the guests at 
the Home who hail from New York State. Suiting action to the idea, arrange- 
ments for such a dinner were made at The Cadet Restaurant. With the assis- 
tance of Marshall Goddard, Home Supervisor, ample transportation for taking 
care of the old timers from New York State was provided. In a body they 
arri^'ed at the restaurant to sit down to a fine dinner at which each and every 
one of them was a guest of honor. A happier group of men could not be 
found in the state. With anywhere from thirty to fifty years of membership 
in the United Brotherhood to their credit, they had a common heritage of 
loyalty and faithfulness to the cause of labor. 

Food, cigars and refreshments, all of the best, were plentiful, and the old 
timers did justice to them all. Happily the elder craftsmen whose sinew and 
skill helped to create the majesty and might of New York State relived old 
days and hashed over old, half -for gotten incidents. The hours slipped by as 
they reached back briefly into the days of their era. 

Charles Johnson, Jr., Board Member from the First District, spoke briefly 
and recalled the great contributions which the old timers made to the build- 
ing of the United Brotherhood into the solid and stable organization it has 
become. He thanked them one and all for the years of loyalty and de\'otion 
they gave to organized labor. Albert Miltner, New York City business repre- 
sentative, also made a short address in which he lauded the fine work which 
old timers are still performing in all localities in the state. At the conclusion 
of the dinner, Hanson presented each of the honored guests with a nice me- 
mento. And thus came to an end a very memorable occasion. 



Are You REGISTERED? If not, why not? 



12 



The Military Needs Watching 

• • • 

ORGANIZED labor has watched with increasing concern the growth of 
an unhealthy practice in establishments which are controlled by the 
military. The practice consists of using enlisted personnel to do work 
that has been done traditionally by civilian workers at civilian rates of pay. 
The Army has done a fair share of such fudging in recent years, but the Na\y 
is the chief offender. In many Navy Yards throughout the nation civilian 
workers have been complaining bitterly at the growing usurpation of civilian 
jobs by enlisted personnel. Actual hardship cases have been reported, as dis- 
placed civilian craftsmen have had to ^ '. 

tear up roots and move elsewhere in 
search of employment because some 
service men were filling their jobs. 
Numerous complaints to the Depart- 
ment of Defense regarding the prac- 
tice have brought forth nothing but 
denials. Meanwhile, the practice con- 
tinues. 

Last month the Metal Trades De- 
partment of the Federation really 
lowered the boom on the Na\y in this 
connection. The Department de- 
manded that an end be put to the 
dangerous and silly practice immedi- 
ately. In a clear cut statement in the 
Metal Trades Bulletin, the Depart- 
ment made it plain that more than 
jobs are at stake in the issue. In part, 
that statement said: 



Howe\er, the latest challenge to 
the navy yard worker is something 
else. It is something which is being 
fostered and carried out by some who 
are either not aware of the traditional 
practices of the Navy Department in 
its relation with ci\'ilian employes, or 
who do not care. The new practices 
are alleged to result in economies of 
operation and to effect economy of 
government spending. 

We assert that present practices, in 
substituting enlisted personnel, are 
neither economical, sound strateg- 



ically, nor fair to the trained navy 
shipyard personnel. Any economies 
which may result from payroll reduc- 
tion of civilian personnel are more 
than balanced by the numbers re- 
quired to perform like work from 
other sources. 

So there may be no misunderstand- 
ing about labor's attitude toward the 
enlisted sailor, let us say we offer no 
criticism of him whatever. We have 
the highest admiration for him. He 
represents the finest type of young 
American manhood. The vast majority 
are the sons of workers. Large num- 
bers are the sons of men who are 
dependent upon work in the naval 
shipyards for their li\'elihood. True 
to their oath to their nation, if ordered 
they are compelled to carry out the 
orders given them, dissatisfied as they 
may be. We would not have them do 
otherwise. 

Further, make no mistake about it, 
we all favor economy in the admin- 
istration of our go\'emment, regard- 
less of its branch, and who it may 
affect. But, we submit that it is not 
economy, nor is it just, that military 
personnel, enlisted for military dut}', 
with the attendant benefits and obli- 
gations, be used to replace govern- 
ment employes at lower rates of pay, 



THE CARPENTER 



13 



and yet at higher aggregate costs- 
that compulsory guaranteed labor be 
used to replace free labor. This is to- 
talitarianism in its initial stages. 

There is still another aspect to this 
invasion of civilian rights which must 
be apparent to those charged with the 
administration of national defense. 

Present practices create the possi- 
bility that workers in the future, if 
they are recruited for naval shipyard 
work, will request rates of wages 
comparable to those they could ob- 
tain in private, commercial employ- 
ment. The attraction of working in 
the navy yard will be dissipated by 
the knowledge that as soon as enlisted 
sailors are a\'ailable and not needed 
for the purpose for which they enlist- 
ed, they will take the mechanics' jobs. 
Surely this is not a very inviting pros- 
pect for the mechanic or the recruit- 
ing of one. 

In addition to the previous com- 
ments, it is evident that attention 
shoud be focused upon another phase 
of current developments which may 
well transcend in importance any 
other question which has been raised. 

We refer to the gradual usurping 
by the military of functions which are 
essentially civilian. We agree that full 
and complete defense measures are 
necessary to protect our nation, its 
people and our way of life. In 
accepting this premise, American 
people must never forget that our 
government is one of laws, one of 
representatives chosen by the people 
of the nation in free elections; a 
go\'ernment responsive to the wish of 
the majority of the people, or as it 
has been so aptly expressed, "of, for 
' and by the people." 

Under such a form of government 
it is difficult to foresee any possibility 
of that government being challenged 
from within. 

However, we assert that today there 
exists a challenge to the rights of 



civilians. This is evident in the grad- 
ual assumption by the Department of 
Defense in the replacement of free 
labor by enlisted, military personnel. 

It is not difficult to envisage mili- 
tary dictatorship, without military 
personnel under military control and 
conditions carrying out every phase 
of defense operations, including those 
civilian in character. 

In the formation of our government 
it was never proposed that the mili- 
tary branches should be a law or body 
unto themselves. The Constitution 
provides for a civilian commander-in- 
chief in the person of the President 
of the United States. This principle 
has been further carried out by the 
selection of civilians to be the chiefs 
of the various departments of defense. 
This system has proved eminently 
satisfactory in the past. Perhaps not 
to those whose horizon is clouded 
with visions of an entire Nation's 
economy and people being subjected 
to the efficiency, precision, and obei- 
sance of a marching army, but we 
must accept the fact that under ci- 
vilian control, we as a nation, have 
managed to get the job done for a 
century and three-quarters. Compari- 
son with the history of other nations 
of the world, who have moved from 
monarchies to pseudo-democracies, to 
dictatorships, proves the wisdom of 
continuing civilian control of all 
branches and agencies of our gov- 
ernment. 

But, we must submit that with the 
complex, scientific, highly technical 
development of defense mechanisms, 
a temptation is oflFered to military 
administrators to by-pass the ci^'ilian 
and to become an agency apart and 
free from the everyday, not too effi- 
cient seeming, administration of a real 
functioning democracy such as our 
own. 

The nation expects its civilian ad- 
ministrators to protect it against any 
movement which might destroy or 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



tend to destroy its essential civilian 
character. We want to believe that 
this basic comer-stone of our freedom 
will be as zealously guarded in the 
future as it has been in the past. 

We believe the principle must be 
practiced, not on the basis of econ- 
omy of operation in terms. of dollars 
and cents, as is professed at the 
present time in the use of enlisted 
personnel and the discharge of civil- 
ians, but on the basis of the preserva- 
tion of an ideal. 

Billions of dollars have been spent 
in the past to preserve our democ- 



racy. Billions are being spent now. 
Billions will be spent in the future. 
Great sacrifices have been made in 
devastating wars. We do not propose 
to permit this most cherished posses- 
sion of the people of our nation to be 
undermined and menaced under the 
guise of economy or ambition. 

And, we further submit, that we 
have every right to expect that work 
traditionally performed by civilians 
continue to be performed by them, 
and that any move away from tradi- 
tional civilian administration in any 
branch of our government be halted. 



LOCAL UNION 1176, GRADUATE APPRENTICES 




Winding up the four years of study 
and work, seven young men of Fargo, 
N. Dak., recently received their journey- 
men certificates at a banquet held at the 
Graver Hotel. A large number of mem- 
bers of Local Union 1176, friends and 
contractors saw the young men receive 
their certificates and welcomed them into 
the industry as qualified journeymen on 
the 6th day of December, 1949. 

Reading from left to right are: Earl Bus- 
by, Director of Apprentice Training Service; 
Wilfred Hemm, Robert Carson, Orville Swan- 
son, Wilbur Hemm, Joe Henning, Governor 
Fred G. Aandahl, Talbert Odegaard, Oliver 
Stoutland, Contractor, Ervin Jacobson, Harry 
Blair and Charlie Carson. 



SAN DIEGO AUXILIARY COMPLETES 23rd YEAR 

The Editor: 

Cheerio, and all good wishes to our Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 170, San 
Diego, Calif. 

We were organized October 28, 1926, and recently celebrated our 23rd year. Since 
1941, oiu- Brotlier Local 1571 has permitted the Auxiliary to hold meetings in its hall, 
located at 3760 Fainnount Ave., E. San Diego, without charge. 

The following are a few of the highlights of our activities during the past year: 

Every second Saturday evening we have social meetings, with our families attending, 
^vhich include potluck suppers, games, dancing, etc. The third Thursday evening of the 
montli, we do charity sewing, and serve refreshments to the men after their meeting. Our 
regular business meeting is held every fourth Friday of the month. A luncheon precedes 
the meeting. 

We hold a bazaar and dinner annually, which is our largest money-making e\ent of the 
year. Last year we bought a new range for the kitchen. 

A benefit dance is sponsored by Local 1571 every fourth Saturday evening with our 
Auxiliary serving the refreshments, proceeds of which go to help some needy member. 

The California State Council of Carpenters held its 22nd Annual Convention in San 
Diego, March 2, 3, 4, 5, 1950, and all tlie five joint Ladies' Auxiliaries from the "Deep 
South" or San Diego County, entertained the \isiting ladies who attended the Convention. 

Fraternally, 

Del Schulte, Recording Secretary. 







Be sure your 
Local Union 
books a showing 
of these two 
United Brother- 
hood films — 



THIS IS YOUR BROTHERHOOD 



and 



CARPENTERS HOME 



3s:x?\?os:x>^-N>:rx>s> 



Produced by authorization of the General Executive Board, 
tliese two films— in color and sound— show the General Office in 
action and the Lakeland Home taking care of old time members. 
There is no charge for the use of these films. They are loaned out 
by the General Office on a first come, first served basis, to Locals, 
Councils and Auxiliaries. If you haven't seen these films, urge your 
Local Union to book a showing as soon as possible. Take it up at 
the next meeting. Full details may be obtained by dropping a 
note to: 

Maurice A. Hutcheson, 

First General Vice-President, 

Carpenters Bldg., 222 E. Jlichigan St. 
Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 



£^£^CNC:^>0£Ng;C^O£;^JCNO£N55CVC^^ 



BUT JOE KEEPS TRYING 

Joe Paup is a stubborn man. Else he 
would realize the utter futility "of beginning 
each monthly session of check writing with 
a tirade against his wife's extravagance. He 
never wins. Take the time he accused her 
of buying furs just to show off in church. 
What was her reply? 

"Joe, dear," she sweetly retorted, "you 
are all wrong— as usual. I bought them just 
to show what a sweet, generous husband 
I have." 

Another time he said, "Baby, we simply 
have to economize. If I died, where would 
you be?" To which she retorted, "I'd be 
right here. The question is, where would 
you be?" 

Still stubbornly persisting, Joe dourly ob- 
served on another occasion, "If I had 
known you were so extravagant, I would 
never have married you." To which tlie 
lady cooly retorted, "If I hadn't been, father 
would never have let you." 

You would think all this would have 
taught Joe to keep his big mouth shut. But 
no! The very next month at bill paying 
time he cracked, "Your extravagance is 




© 1950 C^AHL ^TAMMTzl 

IT'hink you could slip a few clauses 
into a contract I'm negotiating with 
the union?" 



&"^5 1 P 



unbearable. When I die you'll probably! 
have to beg." 

Without dropping a stitch in her knitting, 
Mrs. P. demolished him with, "Well, I, 
should be better off than some poor women ^ 
who have never had any practice." 

• • • . 
ON THE SLOW SIDE 

In the expectation that unemployment 
will pass the five million mark in June when 
the 1950 crop of high school and college 
graduates hits the labor market, the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor is urging strong 
and immediate action to stop the upward 
trend of joblessness before it is too late. 
Among other remedial measures, tlie AFL' 
recommends a substantial increase in the; 
buying power of the nation's workers: 
through wage increases. Increasing pro-i 
ductivity and more than adequate profits 
place many industries in a position where 
they could raise wages moderately without! 
increasing prices. However, neither thei 
goverrmient nor business in general seem; 
very much concerned about the alarming' 
trend that is developing in the job market.. 
For our money they sort of resemble two 
convicts who were assigned to the same cell. 

"How long you in for?" asked convict ( 
No. 1. 

"Seventy-five years," replied No. 2. 
"How long you in for?" 

"Ninety-nine years," replied No. 1. 

"Then you better take the bunk closest 
to the door," replied No. 2, "because you 
will be getting out before I do." 

• * • 
THE WAY IT IS 

Eminent foreign psychiatrists were being 
taken around a French insane asylum. In 
the corridor they met one of the patients. 

"Why," one of the specialists asked him, 
"do you remain huddled up in this corner 
all alone, scratching yourself?" 

"Because," replied the madman, "I am 
the only person in all the world who knows 
where I itch." 

And this explains why Communism will 
never work successfully. The big boys 
think tlie state can do all the scratching for 
everyone, but what they forget is that each 
person alone knows exactly where he itches. 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



GETTING ON 

The young husband had just arrived 
liome from the office. 

"^^'hat's the matter, darUng?" he asked. 
"You look flustered." 

"Oh, I've had a dreadful day," his wife 
answered. "First baby cut his first tooth, 
tlien he took his first step, and then he fell 
and knocked out his tooth." 

"^^^ell, and then what happened?" asked 
her husband. 

"Oh, darling," she ans\A-ered in a shocked 
voice, "he said his first word!" 

* • • 

GENUINE EMERGENCY 

A young surgeon received a telephone 
call from a colleague inviting him to make 
a sLxth at a httle poker game. 

"Going out?" asked his wife suspicious!}'. 

"I'm afraid so," came the prompt reply. 
"It's an awfully important case. There are 
five doctors there already." 

• • • 
HOTELS TO REPAY TAFT 

A recent letter circulated among all hotel 
keepers in Ohio by "The Ohio \^oters," an 
outfit of business men backing Taft, cer- 
tainly takes the cake for something or 
other— ma>'be guts. 

The letter gives Taft the "credit" for 
excluding hotel employes from the seventh- 
five cent minimum wage written into the 
Wage-Hour Law recently. In part, the letter 
said: "We suggest you compute what it 
would have cost you to put j^oiur entire 
working staff on a 40-hour week and a 75- 
cent minimum wage. Then j^ou will kno^^' 
how many dollars the amendment, exempt- 
ing you from the wage and hour scale, will 
save you. . . . Taft described that amend- 
ment in detail on the floor of the Senate 
the day it was up for action. He discussed 
it in a manner most favorable to us. The 
exemption amendment is now law." 

Enclosed with the letter was a pledge 
card suggesting that hotel keepers donate 
to Taft's campaign part of the money his 
actions on the amendment saved them. 

If hotel keepers want to tlirow part of 
the money they saved into Taft's campaign, 
that is tiieir pri^■ilege. Let them do so. Our 
suggestion is that tlie thousands of hotel 
workers who lost the right to tlie 75-cent 
minimum and 40-hour week through Taft's 
actions register and vote against him on 
election day. 



BETTER QUALIFIED 

The doctor had for a patient a stubborn, 
self-opinionated man who disregarded most 
of his ad\ice and diet rules. After the third 
visit, with no improvement in the man's con- 
dition, the doctor blew up. "I cannot under- 
stand your muhsh attitude." he snapped. 
"I have done all that I could for you, but 
>-ou refuse to follow m>' directions. I sug- 
gest that in the futiure, you consult Dr. X, 
do^^•n the street." 

"Why, that man is a veterinar>'!" the 
stubborn one exclaimed. 

"I am well aware of the fact," die doctor 
replied. "Good-day, sir!" 

• • • 

THE SHORT-SIGHTED POLICY 

A young man once found a $2 bill in the 
road . . . from that time on he never lifted 
his eyes from the ground while walking. In 
the course of 40 \'ears he accumulated 29,- 
516 buttons, 52,172 pins, 7 pennies, a bent 
back, a miserable disposition. He lost the 
glories of the light, the smiles of his friends, 
the songs of the birds, the beauties of Na- 
ture and an opportunity to serve his fellow 
man and spread sunshine. 

And this is about the \^-ay it is with non- 
union workers;— they keep their eyes fast- 
ened so tightly on the dollar dues they save 
that they miss the glories of decent living 
and service to tiieir fellow men. 







18 



Imports Won't Hurt Us 

By Bert M. Jewell and Clinton S. Golden. ECA Labor Advisors 

* * 

IX RECEXT months, we have grown increasingly aware of rumblings 
from some labor sources o^"er the Go^'emment's reinforced plan to boost 
imports from Europe into this country. Some workers ha^'e become afraid 
—that the proposal will lead to such a tremendous flood of European goods 
on the American market that similar U, S. made products will not sell. This, 
they reason, will cripple domestic industn.- and put them out of work. 

This fear— of being thro\Mi out of \^-ork— is a \'er\- strong one, particularh- 
here in America in this generation. .And we sympathize \\ith it most strongly. 
We have all of us suffered too many }-ears because of unemplo\'ment and 
the memory is still piercingh" ali\-e. And so the fear is powerful— and, as often 
happens, it has 



translated itself in- 
to dissatisfaction. 
The dissatisfaction 
is directed at that 
agency which most 
informed people 
know is principal- 
ly involved with 
carrying out this 
aspect of the Gov- 
ernment's program. 

We are speak- 
ing, of course, of 
the Economic Co- 
operation Administration, with which 
we are associated as Labor. Advisors 
to Administrator Paul Hoffman. Both 
of us have discussed this problem 
with Mr. Hoffman and we all felt 
that it should be clarified, for the 
good of the industries and workers 
who are now^ so uneasy— and ultimate- 
ly for the well-being of the entire 
country. 

In an attempt to do this, Mr. Hoff- 
man recently wrote a detailed letter 
to Senator H. Alexander Smith in 
which he described the position of 
ECA with respect to imports from 
Europe. It is our feelkig that the 



One of the oldest and most controversial 
questions in the American economic picture 
is that of imports. Almost from the day 
the United States became a sovereign nation 
the question of whether to import or not to 
import has divided opinion sharply. During 
the depression high tariffs versus reciprocal 
trade agreements kept a running debate go- 
ing not only in Congress but in many news- 
papers and magazines as well. 

With Uncle Sam now proposing to boost 
Imports of foreign goods as a means of help- 
ing European nations build up their econ- 
omies, the whole question takes on a new 
importance, especially in view of the fact 
unemployment is steadily climbing here at 
home. This article, by the two top labor 
advisors to the government's European re- 
lief program, insists that the increased im- 
ports proposed will not hurt American in- 
dustry. Next month we will run an article 
giving the other side of the picture. 



trade unionists of 
America should 
know intimately \ 
man}' points which 
he clarifies and we 
shall set forth some 
of them. 

Most significant- 
ly, Mr. Hoffman em- 
phasized through- 
out his letter that 
the American econ- 
omy will not be ad- 
versely affected by 
increased imports of European goods. 
He stated: 

"I don't behe^■e that anyone could 
argue that increased imports amount- 
ing to one-third of one per cent of 
our total output ^ of goods • could have 
any appreciable effect on the total 
economy; nor, of course, is there any- 
thing to the argument that when we 
import goods we are importing un- 
emplo>Tnent. 

"If we do not import, we cannot 
export; and if we do not export, we 
create unemplovment in the export 
field." 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



Mr. Hoffman pointed out that tariff 
concessions can be granted "only 
within the framework of the Recipro- 
cal Trade Agreements Act." He em- 
phasized that concessions can be and 
hsLve been granted only after careful 
review. And then: 

"I know of no instance in which 
tariff concessions have jeopardized 
the life of any American industry." 

Mr. Hoffman revealed that experi- 
ence with Reciprocal Trade Agree- 
ments Act has shown it is possible to 
reduce duties in many industries with- 
out doing serious harm to American 
businessmen. Actually, in the event 
of serious injury to American business 
because of a concession in reciprocal 
tariff negotiations, the Tariff Com- 
mission is required to increase rates. 
Yet in all the years since the "escape" 
clause has been in operation, only a 
handful of industries have asked for 
relief. The majority were dismissed 
for lack of evidence of serious injury. 

Here are the details which he pre- 
sented: 

"Only the following industries have 
applied for relief under the "escape" 
clause: spring clothes pins, candied 
marrons, wool knit berets, whiskey, 
crude petroleum, hops, rattan reeds, 
sponges, narcissus bulbs, knit gloves 
and mittens, woven silk fabric, stencil 
silk and women's fur felt hat bodies. 
A formal investigation was ordered 
in the case of clothes pins, but the 
case was later dismissed. 

"The next eight cases were dis- 
missed for lack of evidence of serious 
injury. In two cases only a single 
firm was involved and in several cases 
the only injury was that part of the 
prewar market had been recaptured 
by foreign suppliers. The whiskey 
case arose because, at the time, the 
production of American distillers was 
limited by the shortage of grain— a 
condition that has passed. The knit 
glove situation continues under study 



to insure that serious injur>' does not 
occur in the future from re\iving Jap- 
anese competition, though it had not 
occurred at the time the industry 
sought relief. The last three cases are 
still pending. This record certainly 
seems to indicate that American busi- 
ness has not been seriously hurt by 
tariff concessions." 

Mr. Hoffman expressed the view 
that there are only two sound ways 
to reduce Europe's dollar gap. One, 
he said, would be to reduce require- 
ments for dollar imports "through 
building up economic sources of sup- 
ply in Europe itself and in other non- 
dollar areas;" the second, by "increas- 
ing Europe's dollar earnings through 
direct, and triangular trade." 

"This means, of course," he contin- 
ued, "that we must sell less to and 
buy more from Europe. There is little 
appeal in such a program but ff we 
do not sell less and buy more, we 
must either continue our aid or see 
the European economy placed in 
grave danger." 

Mr. Hoffman emphasized again and 
again that he does not belie^'e "the 
apprehensions as to the effects of a 
slight increase in imports are well 
founded." He suggested, however, 
that should the new competition re- 
sult in a loss of employment, it might 
be desirable to develop programs for 
retaining and relocation of workers, 
such as we had during the war. 

"I repeat," he declared, "that it is 
my belief that (business) failures due 
to increased imports would be so ut- 
terly insignificant that I consider this 
question of relocation and retraining 
of workers academic rather than fac- 
tual." 

To businessmen who are concerned 
about competition, he suggested that 
"it is domestic, not foreign competi- 
tion, to which they should address 
themselves." 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



In closing, Mr. Hoffman declared: 
"May I state that there are reasons 
other than economic why every effort 
should be made to bring the trade 
between the United States and Eu- 
rope into balance at a reasonably high 
level. The relationships between Eu- 
rope and the United States can be 
sound only if there is no element of 



charity in that relationship. Europe 
wants to pay her own way and we 
should help her to do so. We in EGA 
in administering this program have 
constantly kept in mind that the only 
charity of enduring value is that char- 
ity which lifts people above the need 
of charity." 



Labor's Elder Statesmen 

At the recent American Federation of Labor convention, William Green, president of 
that venerable body, paid high tribute to a group of elder labor statesmen whose combined 
service to the labor movement totals several lifetimes. In the accompamang picture, Green 
(seated) is talking over old times witli Joseph A. MuUaney, president of the Asbestos 
Workers for thirty-seven years and sixty-one years a union man; Frank Duffy, a veteran of 
forty-seven continuous AFL conventions and now General Secretary Emeritus after forty- 




seven years slimlc tu tlie United Brotherhood as General Secretar>'; John C. McDonald, 
fifty years a member of tlae Elevator Constructors, and president since 1938; Wm. J. Mc- 
Sorely, president of the Latliers for forty-four years; William L. Hutcheson, member of the 
United Brotherhod for almost fifty years and General President for the past thirty-five; 
Daniel J. Tobin, a union member for half a century and president of the Teamsters for 
the past forty-two years; Robert Byron, a \'eteran of fifty-two years in unionism as a Sheet 
Metal "Worker, and Joseph D. Marshall who has been active in the Construction Labor- 
ers Union for better than fifty years. President Green himself holds a union card dating 
back sixty years, although serving as Federation president only since 1924. 



21 



Pensions in Canada 



LIKE MOST of their fellow workers south of the border, the vast ma- 
jority of Canadian wage earners is seriously pondering the tvvin prob- 
lems of old age and old age security through pensions. If anything, the 
Canadian toilers have wrestled with the problems e\en longer than their 
brothers in the United States. There are a number of pension plans inaugu- 
rated by Canadian companies which date back more than tsvent>^-five years. 
However, facts and figures on the overall pension picture in Canada are woe- 
fully lacking. Recently the Labor Gazette published a summarization of 
results obtained by a government survey of a number of existing pension plans, 
from which the following is gleaned. 



"There is little information avail- 
able on the cost and the adequacy of 
protection provided by employees' 
pension plans in Canadian industries," 
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
states in its reference paper, Em- 
ployees' Fension and Retirement Flans. 
A survey of industrial pension and 
welfare plans was carried out by the 
Bureau at the end of 1947, but was 
concerned mainly with the extent of 
coverage and certain other character- 
istics, and did not include data on 
amount of contributions and benefits. 
With a view to providing such infor- 
mation, the Bureau has made a sup- 
plementary study of existing plans. 

The information presented in the 
reference paper was compiled from 29 
booklets prepared by companies for 
the use of their employees, which were 
attached to completed questionnaires 
submitted in connection with the 1947 
survey. The Bureau explains that it is 
not possible to determine how many 
firms and employees are actually cov- 
ered, as no request had been made for 
such material and, also, not all firms 
have information in printed form 
available. However, because of a cer- 



tain amount of uniformity in some of 
the features, it is felt that the informa- 
tion is of interest. 

Ten of the plans studied were found 
to be non-contributory, i.e., plans 
where the employees do not contrib- 
ute to the cost, and one contributory 
for salaried employees and non-con- 
tributory for hourly-paid employees. 
Several firms have contributory annu- 
ity plans supplemented by company- 
financed pensions. In one case an 
annuity plan is financed by employees 
only, but supplemented by company- 
paid pensions. 

Only in some instances does the 
fact of a plan being contributor)- make 
for higher benefits than the usual 
for formula described below. 

In most cases the company bears 
the entii-e cost of contributions for 
past service. Only in one case is the 
cost for past service borne entirely by 
the employees. 

The amount of employers' contribu- 
tions is generally not stated; by 
some it is given as "not less" than a 
certain percentage ranging from 1 to 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



5). In one case employees' and em- 
ployers' contributions are equal. The 
amount of employees' contributions is 
usually a fixed percentage of earnings 
(3 to 7); in one case it varies also with 
the age at joining the plan, younger 
employees paying a lower percentage. 
In all cases the employees' contribu- 
tions are deducted from the wages. 

The most frequent formula for the 
calculation of benefits is one per cent 
(in some cases up to IV2 per cent) of 
the average annual earnings, based on 
the last ten or the highest paid ten 
years of service, for each year of serv- 
ice. In some plans the percentage for 
years of past service is slightly lower 
than for years of future service. Under 
one plan benefits are 13 per cent lower 
for women in view of their higher life 
expectancy. One company reports 
benefits as a fixed amount, instead of 
a percentage of earnings, for each 
year of service another sets an annual 
benefit of 1/60 of the total earnings 
since joining the plan, and under one 
contributory plan the annual pension 
is 45 per cent of the employee's total 
contributions. 

In spme cases a minimum benefit is 
guaranteed, mostly an amount of from 
S240 to S360 a year, but under one 
plan it increases according to length 
of service. A few non-contributory 
plans also set an upper limit ranging 
from $900 to $2,500 a year, or a cer- 
tain percentage of earnings. 

Where a pension plan is admin- 
istered by the Annuities Branch of the 
Government of Canada, benefits are 
in accordance with the schedules. As 
annunities are limited to $1,200 a year, 
they are in some cases supplemented 
by another pension plan. 

One contributory plan provides that 
pensions from other sources may be 
deducted, but generally it is provided 
under company-paid plans that other 



income is not deductible except ir de- 
rived from a competitive business. 

One non-contributory plan provides 
slightly reduced benefits for married 
males in order to cover survivors also. 

In cases where the employee leaves 
the employment before qualifying for 
pension the usual provision is that he 
is entitled to the benefits resulting 
from his own contributions. Under 
one plan an employee gets the bene- 
fits also from a certain percentage of 
the employer's contribution after at 
least five years' service. 

The normal retirement age is gen- 
erally fixed at 65 years but many plans 
provide for a lower age— 55 or 60 
years— for female employees. One 
plan extends the maximum up to five 
years for male employees who join 
the plan at a higher age. 

Another plan sets the normal re- 
tirement age at 70 for male employees 
and 60 for female, but voluntary- re- 
tirement is possible at 65 at lower 
benefits. Under this plan benefits are 
based on IVs per cent of average earn- 
ings for each year of service. Under 
the remaining plans provision is made 
for earlier or later retirement in cer- 
tain circumstances. 

Several plans, among them most of 
the non-contributory plans, require a 
certain length of service, ranging from 
15 to 25 years, to establish eligibility 
for benefits. After 30 years' service, 
age requirements are sometimes re- 
duced. Some plans provide for pen- 
sions regardless of age in cases of dis- 
ability after 15 years of service. 

Eligibility for participation in the 
plan in many cases is conditional 
upon a stated length of service, var}'- 
ing from three months to five years. 
In one case the period is three years 
for male employees and five years for 
female. Age appears also as a deter- 
mining factor in some plans, the upper 



THE CARPENTER 



23 



limit being the retirement age or other 
ages ranging from 40 to 65 years. In 
some cases this hmit is 5 to 10 years 
lower for females. Where a minimum 
age is required, it is between 20 to 
34^^2 years; in some instances it is 4 to 
5 years higher for females. 

Under some plans part-time and 
temporary employees, or those paid 
on a commission bases only, are ex- 
cluded from participation. 



Under all contributory plans par- 
ticipation is voluntary for employees 
on the staff at the time the plan is 
instituted. Under some plans partici- 
pation is compulsory for new em- 
ployees; one is compulsory for new 
male employees only. 

The plans are administered by com- 
mercial companies or a trust fund, 
and by the Annuities Branch of the 
Federal Department of Labor. 



LOCAL UNION 2094 PASSES 12th MILESTONE 

On the evening of Jan. 13th, Local 2094, Chicago, celebrated its 12th Anniversary at 
Eagles Hall, 3316 W. Madison St. 

In the presence of some 350 members, the pictures of "General Office" and the "Car- 
penters' Home" were shown and enjoyed, together with a buffet supper which was so graci- 
ously prepared by Anne Hetzel, wife of our Business Agent, Aleck Hetzel. A Barber Shop 
Quartette entertained the members M'ith some very fine selections which added to the en- 
jo>anent of the e^■ening. 




Seated: Frank Zelmar, Business Agent of Local 1307; Stanley Johnson, Secretary- 
Treasurer Chicago District Council; Leon Bruce, Business Agent of Local 141. 

Second Row: Edward Daley, Recording Secretary, Local 2094; Hjalmar Erickson, Busi- 
ness Agent of Local 62; Ralph Hansen, Business Agent of Local 181; Willard Thaisen, 
President, Local 2094; Aleck Hetzel, Business Agent of Local 2094; Chas. Marks. Financial 
Secretary of Local 2094; Chas. Thompson, Business Agent of Chicago District Council. 

Back Row: Oscar Swanson, Trustee of 2094; Martin Fischer, Trustee of 2094; Russell 
Frees, Trustee of 2094; Jack Hill, Secretarj^-Treasurer, Illinois State Council of Carpenters; 
Abe Thompson, Business Agent of Local 183, Peoria, 111. 

The Local was also honored with tlie presence of some visiting members of other organiza- 
tions; namely, Jack Hill, Secretary-Treasurer of the Ilhnois State Council of Carpenters; 
Stanley Johnson. Secretar>'-Treasurer of the Chicago District Council: Frank Zelmar, Busi- 
ness Agent of Local 1307; Leon Bruce, Business Agent, Local 141; Hjalmar Erickson, 
Business Agent of Local 62: Ralph Hanson, Business Agent of Local 181; Chas. Thompson 
Business Agent of Chicago District Council and Abe Thompson, Business Agent of Local 
183, Peoria, 111. 

Local 2094 wishes at this time to thank General President William L. Hutcheson for the 
pictures of "General Office" and "Carpenters' Home" which togetlier widi some able 
speakers and fine entertainment, made our 12th Anniversary a very successful one. 



Editorial 




Taft Is Out Of Step 

Like the flag-bearer who marched straight down the street while the rest 
of the parade turned the corner, the Taft-Byrd Senate combine seems to be 
marching by itself these days. Every piece of social legislation that has come 
up in the last two sessions of Congress has found Taft and Byrd in violent 
opposition. "Socialism" and "economy" are the two pegs upon which they hang 
their non-concurrence hats. Anything that tends to afford the common people 
greater security from the vicissitudes of old age and the uncertainities of our 
economic system Taft and Byrd seem to oppose almost automatically as being 
too sociahstic or too expensive. 

Xot many years ago that was the tune that business in general was singing. 
In recent months, however, many segments of business seem to have seen the 
light. \\'hen some of the nation's leading business magazines start plugging 
for liberalization of the Social Security program and passage of some sort of 
legislation to improve the nation's health at the low income level, it can hardly 
be said that all business is opposed to social legislation. These things have 
already transpired. Last month "Business Week," one of the foremost indus- 
trial publications in the nation, came out editorially and unequivocally for 
liberalization of the Social Securit}' program along the lines laid out in H. R. 
6000, which the House passed last year. This is a fight that labor has carried 
on for a long time. Now that labor's eflEorts seem close to success, "Business 
Week" climbs on the bandwagon. With the same arguments labor has con- 
sistenth' used in its fight for decent pensions, the business organ echoes labor's 
own words. 

"Why is there so much steam behind the drive to expand the Social Se- 
curity program?" the magazine asks, and then gives its answer: "The chief 
reason is that time has made the present Social Security pension plan, orig- 
inally passed in 1935, obviously inadequate." 

Even in 1935 the pensions were much too low "and the cost of li\'ing has 
risen almost 70 per cent since then," declares "Business Week." It cites the 
fact that average annuities under the act are far less than the "charit>-" pen- 
sions paid by states to needy aged. 

"The pension plan simply isn't doing the job it was designed to do," the 
magazine adds. "That was to provide an insurance plan that would make 
people who are too old to work independent of charity." 

Of course there may be an ulterior motive behind Business Week's a\-owed 
liberahsm in this particular case. A number of industries have conceded to 
their employes (at considerable prodding from the unions) pension plans that 
include Social Securit)'. The most common plan calls for a $100 per month 
pension including Social Securit}". Naturally, the higher the Social Security 
benefits go, the less employers will have to shell out to make up the SIOO. 
For all that, however, "Business Week" does admit that present Social Security' 
benefits are wholly inadequate. And it further admits that pensions ought to 



THE CARPENTER 25 

make people too old to work independent of charity. Since these are the things 
labor has long contended, there is no use delving too deeply into the motives 
that prompted the magazine's change of heart. 

But "Business Week" is not the only business publication that has seen the 
foolishness of fighting decent social legislation and thereby giving Communism 
additional ammunition for recruiting purposes among the least privileged. 
Recently the Luce publications, particularly "Time" and "Fortune," editorially 
recognized the necessity for adoption of a national health program. The mag- 
azines opposed socialized medicine but they recognized the need for some sort 
of program to make adequate medical service available to all citizens, and 
some sort of prepayment system for eliminating ruinous costs of serious ill- 
ness. Even in organized labor, few people are in favor of straight socialized 
medicine. What most working people want is adequate medical care for all 
under a system that places the cost within the means of the indi\'idual. 

With magazines like "Business Week" and "Fortune" recognizing the need 
for sound social legislation, it is clear that black reaction is fading out in some 
sections of business. Publications of this type seldom lead the parade. They 
do not make business policy. Rather they try to smell out trends and climb 
on the bandwagon. That they are now approving social reform may indicate 
better days ahead for all. 

However, Taft and Byrd and their followers are still marching down "Hold 
Everything Street" while the parade has started turning down "Progress 
Avenue." 



There Is Room for More Enlightenment 

One can seldom pick up a newspaper or magazine these days without read- 
ing at least one story about how "enlightened" business has become in recent 
years. According to these pieces, all the heavy-handed employers who ex- 
ploited, browbeat, and victimized their helpless employes in the pre-union era 
are now gone; consequently unions are not really needed any more. It sounds 
fine; but a look at the farm labor situation as it exists today in the Southwest 
proves otherwise. There the big farm corporations are legally importing thou- 
sands of Mexican peasants to work their fields at a time when many American 
farm workers are without jobs. Furthermore the legal quota is being evaded 
by importation of untold numbers of "wetbacks"-Mexican laborers who are 
illegally smuggled into this country. The result is the kind of a glut of labor 
that profit-hungry corporations like; several men, unschooled, ignorant of the 
language, and practically helpless, bidding against each other for each a\ail- 
able job. That is how "enlightened" the big agricultural corporations of the 
west are. Not only are American farm workers being demoralized and hurled 
into the lowest pits of poverty, but it is only a matter of time before the 
demoralizing effects will be felt in other industries as farm workers, in despera- 
tion try to invade other industries. 

It is incumbent upon the U. S. Government to avert further demoralization 
and impoverishment by formulating a workable and equitable system of re- 
cruiting, transporting, placing and housing American migrant farm workers. 

And in the meantime it looks as if unions v^ill continue being needed, for 
a few more years at least. 



THE LOCKER 

By JOHN HART. Local Union 366, New York, N. Y. 



Here are 50 more True or False questions taken from a test held recently by the City of 
New York for the position of carpenter. Take 2 points for each correct answer. Total points 
is your percentage. Passing mark 76^. .Answers on page 29. 

16 questions can be answered readily and \^'ith absolute certainty' 16 

20 of the remainder you are prett\- sure. Say you get three-quarters right 15 

14 are left,, of which you know nothing. By guess you should get half right 7 

Percentage 76% ~38 

True or False 

1. An arch center is a form used in concrete construction 

2. Wood screws range in length from ^4 inch to 6 inches 

3. The combined tliickness of 2 dressed 2x4's measures 8^4 inches 

4. Matched T and G flooring is always milled to standard lengths 

5. The molding on top of a baseboard is called a bed molding 

6. Rafters running from hip to plate are known as jack rafters 

7. A ribbon board and a ledger board mean the same thing 

8. Finished o-inch flooring measures 2^2 inches on the face 

9. A hanger bolt is used in furniture construction 

10. The brace table can be found on the framing square 

11. A dowel sharpener is a tool used to measvire tlie diameter of tlie dowel 

12. Tail joists are set between trimmers 

13. Floor beams are sized to even widtlis 

14. Beam tops in places where deafening occurs should be chamfered 

15. Sub flooring should be tightly dra\^-n together by toe nailing 

16. Trees are classified into tsvo groups 

17. Lagging strips are part of an arch center 

18. A semi-elliptical arch has only one radius 

19. A molding consisting of a cove and ogee is called a crown molding 

20. Flush girder construction requires the use of a ledger board 

21. Tlie plates at the comer of a building meet in a half lap joint 

22. A stor>- pole is used to support a girder 

23. Hot glue sets slower tlian cold glue 

24. Dowels are usually made of maple wood 

25. A bull nose plane is used for planing close to projecting parts 

26. A corona is a member of a cornice 

27. A take-apart framing square has tliree parts 

28. A queen truss has four sides 

29. Hard woods are generally sawn into standard ^\idths and lengths 

30. The bed of a jack plane is 16 inches long 

31. A turning saw and a coping saw can be used for the same t>"pe work 

32. Bar clamps and handscrews are iisually made of like material 

33. A mending plate is a flat piece of metal \\itli holes for wood screws 

34. A jig saw and a band saw have similar rotar>- action 

35. A bed molding is also known as a crown molding 

36. Casing nails and finishing nails are the same 

37. A segmental arch has two radii of unequal lengths 

38. A rabbet joint can be cut on a jointer machine 

39. Some circular saw blades have inserted teeth 

40. A tliumb latch is applied to the face of a door 

41. Sheathing appHed horizontally shrinks in a horizontal direction 

42. The length of a screwdriver is measured from the point to the top of handle 

43. A face plate is part of a latlie 

44. Through naihng of a finish floor is inferior to toenailing 

45. The teetli of a wood file are coarser than those of a wood rasp 

46. Laminated stock is stock which has been glued edge to edge 

47. X. C. pine is commonly used for exterior siding 

48. A T sill used in balloon frame construction requires no fire stops 

49. A muntin divides tlie panes in colonial type \^indow sash 

50. A bastard file is as effective as sandpaper to smooth a cur\"ed surface 



Official Information 




General Officers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



Gbneeal Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HDTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Acting Secretaet 

ALBERT B. FISCHER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill B. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, O. WM. BLAIBR 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District, ARTHUR MARTEL 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the Acting Secretary 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

We \\dsh to remind all Locals that the 26th General Convention of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America will be held in the Auditorium of the Cincinnati 
Masonic Temple, Cincinnati, Ohio, beginning September 5, 1950, at 2:00 P.M. and continue 
in session from day to day until the business coming before tlie Convention has been 
completed. 

The Convention Call was issued under date of March 4, 1950, by authority of tlie Gen- 
eral Executive Board. In accordance with tlie General Executive Board, as per tlie Con- 
vention Call, all Delegates and Alternates must be elected in the months of April and May, 
instead of June and July and the names of the Delegates elected to be in the General Office 
not later tihan June 15, 1950. 

The Recording Secretary must report at once to tlie Acting General Secretary the name 
and post ofBce address of the Delegate and Alternate under penalty of fine as provided in 
Paragraph F, Section 18 of our General Laws. When the name of tlie Delegate is reported 
to tlie General Office, blank credentials and further information will be sent to tlie elected 
Delegate. 

We also wish to call your attention to the following: 

All amendments to the General Constitution submitted by the Local Unions, District, State or 
Provincial Councils for the consideration of the Convention shall be forwarded to the office of the 
Secretary and in accordance with the action of the General Executive Board will be published in 
our journal, "The Carpenter," after the July 15th date preceding the Convention and no further 
amendments shall be considered by the Constitution Committee other than those submitted in 
accordance with the above, but amendments to any Section can be offered from the floor during th« 
report of the Constitution Committee. 

Fraternally yours, 

ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary. 



Ji n 0i 



Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 



i> tnttrtant 



They still live in our memory, 
And will forever more 



%tsi in ^tsctt 

The Editor has been requested to publish the nameB 
ef the following Brothers who have passed away. 



HENRY ALLABACH, L. U. 824, Muskegon, 

Mich. 
HERMAN J. AUBIN, L. U. 94, Providence, R. I. 
LUCIEN BERNIER, L. U. 94, PROVIDENCE, 

R. I. 
FRED BLOCK, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wis. 
CECIL BRIGHAM, L. U. 871, Battle Creek, 

Mich. 
JOHN B. BOITEAU, L. U. 801, Woonsocket 

R. L. 
JOSEPH A. BOUTIN, L. U. 94, Providence, 

R. I. 
ARTHUR BROWN, L. U. 544, Baltimore, Md. 
CHARLES J. BROWN, L. U. 322, Niagara 

Falls, N. Y. 
O. R. BROWN, L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Tex. 
JACOB CHRISTENSEN, L. U. 20, N. Y. N. Y. 
DANIEL COLE, L. U. 281, Binghamton, N. Y. 
PATRICK CORMIER, L. U. 94, Providence R. I. 
H. L. CROW, L. U. 1822, Ft. Worth, Tex. 
WILLIAM H. CROWELL, L. U. 40, Boston 

Mass. 
MARTIN CRUMM, L. U. 20, New York, N. Y. 
THOMAS DAY, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
MINOR i-DECKER, L. U. 281, Binghamton, N. Y. 
ABRAHAM DOBSON, L. U. 1677, Thorold, 

Ont., Can. 
WILLIAM DUGGAN, L. U. 35, San Rafael, Cal. 
JOHN W. ESTEP, L. U. 1202, Merced, Calif. 
KARL F. FEYHL, L. U. 1489, Burlington, N. J, 
MICHAEL FINNERAN, L. U. 20, New York, 

N. Y. 
THEODORE FUCHS, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
G. W. GIBSON, L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
CLYDE GILES, L. U. 11, Cleveland, Ohio 
PETER GINDT, L. U. 943, Tulsa, Okla. 
LOUIS GLASER, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
HERMAN A. GREENART, L. U. 500, Butler, Pa. 
JACK HANSEL, L. U. 1449, Lansing, Mich. 
JAMES L. HUGHLETT, L. U. 943, Tulsa, Okla. 
JOHN A. JOHNSON, L. U. 20, New York, N. Y. 
PAUL KELLER, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 
JOSEPH A. J. KING, L. U. 94, Providence, R. I. 
SAMUEL W. KIRBY, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
ISAAC KORPELA, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, Wis. 
EARL R. LIPPINCOTT, L. U. 1489, Burlington, 

N. J. 
W. A. LOVE, L. U. 618, Sikeston, Mo. 



PETER J. McLaughlin, L. U. S, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
L. O. MILLER, L. U. 943, Tulsa, Okla. 
KENDALL MONAHAN, L. U. 20, New York, 

N. Y. 
SIDNEY MORGAN, L. U. 94, Providence, R. I. 
EDWARD MURPHY, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
LOUIS NORDLE, L. U. 625, Manchester, N. H. 
FRED NUNNALLY, L. U. 1749, Anniston, Ala. 
JOHN J. OBERMEYER, L. U. 264, Milwaukee, 

Wis. 
ROBERT PALM, L. U. 2236, New York, N. Y, 
VERNON PASHOTE, L. U. 316, San Jose, Cal. 
J. HARRY REAGAN, L. U. 16, Springfield, IlL 
LOUIS REINSTEIN, L. U. 246, New York, N. Y. 
FRED ROBERTS, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
JOSEPH ROTHMUND, Sr., L. U. 6, Amsterdam, 

N. Y. 
HJALMAR SAAMANEN, L. U. 2236, New York, 

N. Y. 
C. J. SCOGGINS, L. U. 1683, El Dorado, Ark. 
DAVID SHARROW, L. U. 1154, Algonac, Mich. 
MICHAEL SHEEHAN, L. U. 281, Binghamton, 

N. Y. 
JAMES F. SIZEMORE, L. U. 60, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
CYRIL J. SMITH, L. U. 1426, Elyria, Ohio 
ISAAC W. STOCK, L. U. 298, Long Island City, 

N. Y. 
RAY F. STODDARD, L. U. 30, New London, 

Conn. 
PERCY STUART, L. U. 281, Binghamton, N. Y. 
CHARLES SWANSON, L. U. 625, Manchester, 

N. H. 
SAM TARDANI, L. U. 824, Muskegon, Mich. 
WILFRED TERRY, L. U. 94, Providence, R. I. 
LOUIS THEN, L. U. 488, New York, N. Y. 
FRANK TRETHRIE, L. U. 871, Battle Creek, 

Mich. 
LEE WALKER, L. U. 1692, Galesburg, 111. 
CORNELIUS WALRAVEN, L. U. 67, Boston, 

Mass. 

ROBERT E. WATSON, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
M. C. WELSH, L. U. 1692, Galesburg, 111. 
JOHN WESTERLUND, L. U. 316, San Jose, Cal. 
ROBERT WOODS, L. U. 16, Springfield, lU. 
ISRAEL YUM, L. U. 67, Boston, Mass. 
LEWIS ZAGERS, L. U. 2391, Holland, Mich. 
BERNARD ZIEFANG, L. U. 322, Niagara Falls, 
N. Y. 



THE CARPENTER 

ANSWERS TO "THE LOCKER" 



29 



the 



The answer is one word, eitlier True or False. 
right answer. What follows is added by way of 



If you'\e got the right word you've got 
comment. 



1. 


True. 


2. 


True. 


3. 


False. 


4. 


False. 


5. 


False. 


6. 


True. 


7. 


True. 


8. 


False. 


9. 


True. 


10. 


True, 


11. 


False. 


12. 


False. 


13. 


True. 


14. 


True. 


15. 


False. 


16. 


True. 



17. 


True. 


IS. 


False. 


19. 


True. 


20. 


True. 


21. 


True. 


22. 


False. 


23. 


False. 


24. 


False. 


25. 


True. 


26. 


True. 



Used in masonry work also. 
From Xo. to No. 30, screw 
gauge. 

Twice 1% ins.^3y4 ins. 
Random lengths generally. 
It is called a base molding. 
Also known as hip jacks. 
Broadly speaking. 
It measures 2V4 inches. 
Like the bolt that secures the 
leg in a knock-down table. 
On the back of tlie tongue. 
It is used in a brace like a pen- 
cil sharpener to chamfer dowel 
ends. 

That's the answer. 
When set on level beds. 
To reduce the surface area. 
Should be spaced slightly. 
Deciduous and evergreen. 
Broad leaf and needle leaf. 
Hardwood and softwood. Take 
your pick. 

Narrow, spaced strips nailed 
across the ribs. 

An approximate elliptic arch 
has 3 centers and 2 radii usually. 
That's near enough. 
See what your building code 
has to say about it first. 
That's the proper way. 
It is a heiglit rod used to carry 
various check marks from floor 
to floor. 

It sets much faster. 
We would say birch. 
The cutter is way up front. 
It is tlie projecting part under 
the cyina recta of a classic cor- 
nice. The bed mold goes under. 



27. False. 



28. True. 



29. 
30. 

31. 
32. 



False. 
False. 

True. 
False. 



33. True. 



34. 


False. 


35. 


False. 


36. 


False. 


37. 


False. 


38. 


True. 


39. 


True. 


40. 


True. 


41. 


False. 


42. 


False. 



43. True. 



44. True. 



45. False. 



46. 


False. 


47. 


False. 


48. 


True. 


49. 


True. 


50. 


False. 



2 parts. The tongue and blade, 
if you don't count tlie screw. 
Tie beam, collar beam, 2 main 
rafters. 

Random widths and lengths. 
Iron jack planes run from 11% 
to 15 inches long. 
The turning saw is much larger. 
A bar clamp is iron. A hand- 
screw is made of wood. 
You can buy them in the dime 
stores. Many a home is held to- 
gether with a dollar's worth of 
mending plates. 

The jig saw jigs up and down. 
See Question 19. 
A casing nail has a flared head 
and a heavier gauge. 
Being an arc it has 1 radius. 
By adjusting the table. 
Of extra qualitv' steel. 
Usually a batten door. 
It shrinks vertically. 
It is measured from the ferrule 
to the tip of the blade. 
The acti\e disc opposite the tail 
stock. 

Except when it is 5/16 inch 
square edged. 

The teeth of a wood rasp are 
punched in. 

Laminated means face to face. 
Could be used for sheathing. 
It acts as fire stop itself. 
Sometimes called a sash bar. 
Files are graded, coarse, bastard, 
second cut, smooth. A bastard 
file is rather coarse if compared 
to, say. No. 1 sandpaper. 



LANSING LADIES KEEP ACTIVE 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 545, Lansing, Mich. 

We are a small group but hope to get more members. ^ 

We meet the second and fourth Thvu-sday evenings of the month in tlie Carpenters 
Building. 

About once a month, we have a card party which is open to all carpenters and their 
families and friends. 

Recently Local 1449 piu-chased an electric range for the kitchen, which will enable us 
to serve suppers. We appreciate this very much. They have also built cupboards and 
tables. . . 

We invite all wives, mothers, sisters and daughters of members of Local 1449 to join 

us as members. 

Fraternally, 

Ethel King, Recording Secretary. 



CorrospondoncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

SCRANTON LOCAL HOLDS ANNUAL PARTY 

The banquet room of the Hotel Casey, Scranton, Pa., was never merrier than it was 
on the night of February 28th, last, when Local No. 261 held its annual dinner dance there. 
Some 250 members, friends and invited guests were on hand to help the union celebrate in 

grand style. Witli plenty of 
fine food and lots of good fel- 
lowship everyone was in a hoU- 
day mood and a great time was 
had by all. 

Alphonsus L. Ca.sey, prom- 
inent Scranton attorney, spoke 
on the dangers inlierent in the 
Taft-Hartley Law. Teddy 
O'Keefe, Wilham A. Kendrick 
and Daniel McKee, officers of 
the Pennsylvania State Council, 
were on hand to give a few 
\"ery brief remarks. Also pres- 
ent was E. J. Horo, Vice-Pres- 
ident of the Essex County Dis- 
trict Council, Newark, N. J. 
From the Scranton Building 
Trades Council, William F. 
Horan, Anthony Bonacuse, Ross Smirne, Al. Catarino, Phil Brady, Jack Harding. Joseph Cor- 
coran, and John Burke were on deck to extend felicitations from other building trades crafts. 
All in all, the e\ening proved to be a complete success and aU are looking forward to the next 
similar e\'ent. 




Pictured above is the arrangements committee responsible 
for the successful celebration. First row, left to right, Stan- 
ley Green, Matt Rossi, Richard Gohsler, Joseph Canterbury, 
Harry Hinkler, Joseph F. Bartell, Charles J. Harvey, Thomas 
F. Flynn. , 

Second row, left to right: Henry Skibinski, Joseph Marcin- 
cus, Patrick Armen, Robert Feguson, Joseph Fitterer, Kermit 
Pilger, Paul Ross, William Laffey, Albert Cetta. 



SPARTA, ILLINOIS, LOCAL JOINS GOLDEN CIRCLE 

Local Union No 479, Sparta's oldest labor union, \vith the possible exception of the 
United Mine Workers local, celebrated its 50th anniversary with a dinner and program 
at Calvin Hall, First Presbyterian Church, Friday, February 10th. 

About 35 members of Local No. 479, and their wives enjoyed a dinner served by 
ladies of the church and listened to an interesting program, with the financial secretary, 
Oscar Stahlman, as master of ceremonies. 

R. J. McMichael, a charter member, was the center of attraction and occupied a 
place of honor at the head table. Mr. McMichael was one of ten men who organized the 
local at Sparta on February 17, 1900. Previously, these men had belonged to the old 
Federation of Labor but saw the need of their own union and decided to organize. 

In a short talk, Mr. McMichael said that he started work as a carpenter at 15c per 
hour, working a ten-hour day. Finally, the daily wage scale was raised to $2 and members 
thought they had just about reached the peak. Mr. McMichael was presented a bouquet 
as a tribute from other members of the local. 

Minutes of Local 479 ha\e been kept intact since the organization and are in the hands 
of Mr. Stahlman. The membership has increased until today 72 members are enrolled, 
most of them being Spartans. 

The minutes show that as recently as 1911, the minimum scale for carpenters was only 
40c per hour and apprentices were paid 20c per hour. 



THE CARPENTER 



31 



CARPENTERS PLAN PARTICIPATION IN WESTERN CONFERENCE 0\ 

APPRENTICESHIP 

Tlie District Council of Carpenters of Portland and Vicinity at its recent meeting held 
at Portland, Oregon, January 12, 1950, passed a resolution which shows the keen interest 
in apprenticeship. Further evidence of this is that both Clell Harris and Lloyd Goodwin 
are on the Planning Committee. Clell Harris, Secretary-Treasurer of the District Council of 
Carpenters, is on the Finance Committee, and Lloyd Goodwin, Apprentice Coordinator, is 
on the Program Committee. 

The Western Conference on Apprenticeship will be held at Seaside, Oregon, during 
May 22-26, 1950. While planning this conference every effort has been made to preclude 
weak points which ha\'e been observed in previous conferences of tliis nature. Very gener- 
ous assistance has been given by other regions in the country- in assisting in the planning 
of this conference. The records of the experiences of other regions have been studied to 
insure the best results. 

The Oregon State Federation of Labor has been actively engaged in tlie promotion of 
tliis conference and tlirough its officials, information on the conference has been dissemi- 
nated to all local unions in Oregon. At recent conferences of state-wide trade groups reso- 
lutions have been presented and passed supporting tlie \\'estern Conference on Apprentice- 
ship. All those interested in participating are being notified that accommodations can be 
reser\ed through tlie Seaside Chamber of Commerce. 

The conference will consist of panel discussions led by leaders of tlie industries which 
nonnalh- benefit through apprenticeship. Anyone desiring further information on program 
planning ma>' contact Clell Harris, 310 Labor Temple, Portland 4, Oregon, or Lloyd Good- 
win of tlie same address. 



U. B. MEMBERS ALWAYS EXTENDING HELPING IL\ND 

The above carpenters of Local 525 
Coshocton, Ohio, played the part of the 
Good Samaritian, when the American 
Legion of West Lafayette, Ohio, made an 
appeal for some help in rehabilitating 
its quarters. They laid 2000 ft. of floor- 
ing and did other carpenter work that 
was needed. After the work was com- 
pleted they were served a fine meal by 
the Legion members. Tlie Legion ex- 
pressed their sincere thanks to the boys 
for their fine spirit and cooperation. 

Mr. Stoneburner, Business Agent of 

T „ 1 ,-.T- 1 1 1 r ,, 1 C. Parks, D. Cain, M. Christian, C. Stoneburner, 

Local d2o, had charge of the work. h. Harding, E. Strohacker and R. Strohacker. 




LOCAL UNION NO. 1006 APPRENTICE JOINT BOARD ^ ERY ACTRE 

The joint Apprentice Board of Master and JourneyTiien Carpenters, members of United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Local Union No. 1006. New Bruns- 
wick, New Jersey, are doing a remarkable job in operating the Apprentice program to 
the letter, all as per Apprenticeship Standards. 

Robert E. Ross. 2nd, Chainnan, \\'illiam Connolly Sr., and Louis Gons are the Master 
Carpenter members, and William H. Dunliam, Business Agent, Andrew Black and Nic- 
holas L. Arace, Secretan,', the Joumejiiien Carpenter members of this Board. 

All apprentices while attending school and working in the field, are imder constant 
and rigid supervision, and this Board feels that when their apprenticeship is completed, 
tliey will be skilled mechanics. 

OflScial classroom visits are made by this Board in a body, with Frederick Forges, 
Apprentice Coordinator, in charge, to secure first hand information on all apprentices. 

To a large extent the fine success achieved b>- Local Union No. 1006 in connection 
with tliis program, can be credited to tlie unselfish and untiring efforts of ever>- member 
on this Board. 



32 THE CARPENTER 

UTAH STATE COUNCIL HOLDS SPRING CONVENTION 

The Utah State Council of Carpenters held their Spring Convention at Brigham City, 
Saturday afternoon, March 25th. The Council is composed of nine affiliated locals, namely 
Brigham Citv, Logan, Ogden, Salt Lake City, Provo, Tooele, Price, Kamb, and Millmen's 
Local No. 725 of Salt Lake City. 

Ernest Cox, President, presided over the meeting which was in session from 1:00 P.M. 
Delegates from all of the Local Unions affiiliated with the Council were present. 

Sherman Lund, Apprenticeship Coordinator for the State of Utah, gave an interesting 
talk on Apprentices, and the need for skilled craftsmen in the Building Trades, in the 
U. S. today. 

Work problems throughout the State were discussed tiioroughly during tlie meeting. 

Election of officers was held and B. J. Wilson of Local 184, Salt Lake City, was elected 
President. William G. Ryan of Local 1498, Provo, was elected Secretary-Treasurer. 

Ernest Cox, the retired President, had been president for the past five years. Mr. Cox 
was elected President Emeritus of the Council and he was also elected an honorary dele- 
gate of the Council. Ernest Cox has carried a union card for the past fifty years, and has 
been a popular president with the State Council. A vote of appreciation and gratitude 
was given to Ernest Cox for his fine efi^orts in our behalf. 

The Ladies Auxiliary of Brigham City Carpenters Local No. 1886 entertained the 
delegates' wives in the afternoon by taking the ^■isiting ladies through the new Indian 
School, located at Brigham City. Later in the afternoon bridge and pinochle games were 
played. 

In the evening at 6:00 P.M. a banquet supper was served at the Howard Hotel. The 
food was evcellent. Fi\e local entertainers put on three acts of vaude\'ille, which was 
greatly enjoyed by all present. 

At 9:00 P.M. a dance was held in the Carpenters' Hall. Refreshments were served and 
a lovely time was enjoyed by everyone present. 

The officers of Local 1886, the Ladies Auxiliary, the arrangement conmiittee and all 
the members of Local 1886 have the thanks of the State Council and also the thanks of the 
delegates and their wives for a good convention. 

The mid-year convention of the State Council of Carpenters will be held in Salt Lake 
City, Utah the last Saturday in July, 1950. 



PROUD LITTLE CANANDAIGUA LOCAL MARKS 50th ANNIVERSARY 

Canandaigua, N. Y., area's oldest and for many years only labor organization cele- 
brated its 50th birthday anniversary early in March. 

About 50 officers and members of Canandaigua Local 502, celebrated the occasion 
during a banquet at Red Top Inn, East Bloomfield. Many of them were accompanied by 
their w)\es or other members of their families. District and state officers of the union 
were featured speakers. 

But by far the most honored of those attending was Bernhard (Ben) Nill, the local's 
only active charter member and now one of three trustees. 

Nill alone remains in good standing of those who on Feb. 26, 1900, gathered for a 
formal ceremony here that marked the initiation of the local. 

He still remembers well ceremonies that installed the local's first officers. They were: 
President, Bert H. Clark; vice president, Charles Freer; recording secretarj^ F. J. Fain- 
bairn, financial secretary, George Martin; treasurer, Henry Weller; conductor, William 
Palmer; warden J. E. Kimball; and trustees, Frank Perr>', John Barnett and William Smith. 

Present officers of the local are president, Herbert H. (Herb) Famsworth, of Chapin; 
vice president, Addison Huchins; treasurer, John Scammell: financial secretary, Lester J. 
Butler; recording secretary, W. E. Andrews; warden, Don Paterson; conductor, Harold 
Kimble; and trustees, H. S. Tiffin, Joe Muscato and Nill. 

Toastmaster for the event was Ralph Brye, Rochester, president of the Rochester Dis- 
trict Council. He was introduced bj' President Famsworth. 

Speakers were Anthony Schneider, Rochester, district business manager, and John 
O'Donnell, New York Cit>% international representati\e. 

All women attending the banquet were presented with corsages. It was followed by 
entertainment and dancing. 



THE CARPENTER 



33 



CLIFTON LOCAL MARKS 25th BIRTHDAY 

Last year Local Union No. 1939, Clifton, N. J. rounded out its twenty-fifth year of 
service to the carpenters of the community. The occasion was celebrated with a fine 
dinner dance which drew a large attendance and proved to be a great success. Special 
guests included members of the Passaic County and Vicinity District Council and their 
wives. Also present was General Representative Raleigh Rajoppi, who is also president 
of the New Jersey State Council. Brother Rajoppi gave a short but effective address. 

Brother Adolpli Zanetti acted as master of cermonies. After a short welcoming speech 
he gave a very enlightening history of the local. 

Following an excellent dinner, tlie members, wives and special guests present en- 
joyed the two colored movies "Carpenters' Home" and "This is our Brotherhood". The 
films were very well received. Following the showing of the movies, dancing and refresh- 
ments were made available to all who were interested. All who attended declared the 
celebration an unqualified success. 



RICHMOND CELEBRATES GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY 



On October 22nd of last year, Local Union 
Golden Anniversary. In the presence of a large 




Pictured above is the fine roster of old time 
members of Local Union No. 388, each with over 
thirty years of membership, who were honored 
guests at the union's Golden Anniversary cele- 
bration. Reading from left to right, they are: 
B. D. Motley and grandson, H. L. Sale, M. S. 
Morris, J. B. Berkison, D. C. Bailey, R. W. Flour- 
ney, H. A. Haurand, E. L. Reams, A. J. Eheart, 
J. M. Wade, W. H. Gaul, W. A. Moran, and T. A. 
Dewsberry, who between them make up almost 
500 years of membership. 



No. 388, Richmond, Va., celebrated its 
number of members, friends and guests, 
the local paid special tribute to the large 
number of old timers in the organization. 
Local Union No. 338 is extremely proud 
of its twenty old timers each of whom 
has more than thirty years of continuous 
membership to his credit. President 
George L. Turner acted as master of 
ceremonies and welcomed as honored 
guests the old time members. Brother 
Dan Bailey who has nearly half a century 
of membership to his credit responded 
for the old timers. At the present time 
some eleven members of the local are 
on the pension roll. 

A fine buffet supper was served, after 
which the two Brotherhood films "Car- 
penters' Home" and "This is our Brother- 
hood" were shown. The Films ehcited 
many complimentary remarks. Other en- 
tertainment rounded out the evening. 
Special guest at the event was General 
Representative Lee W. Sorrell. 



FULTON LOCAL DISPLAYS CHRISTIAN SPIRIT 

Two thousand >ears ago the Carpenter of Nazareth roamed the world preaching brother- 
hood and neighborliness. Down the years his teachings have pointed the way to build a 
better world. That his teachings have not been forgotten was recently proved by Local 
Union No. 887, Fulton, Ky., and the people of tlie community. When a flash fire late last 
year destroyed all the worldly goods of two widowed women and their five children, seven 
people were left absolutely destitute. Neighbors pitched in to give what aid they could 
but for all their generosity the aid they could give was limited. For the burned-out family 
the situation appeared to be black. 

But then the spirit of the Carpenter of Nazareth manifested itself. The community 
undertook to raise enough funds to procure a new home for the unfortunate fire \'ictims. 
Funds began to roll in. Small contributions and sizeable contributions rolled in. Soon 
there was enough to buy a place that had possibilities but was desperately in need of 
repairs. But that situation, too, was soon remedied, tlianks to the pubhc spiritedness of 
tlie officers and members of Local No. 887. Working in their spare time on a \ oluntary 
basis, members of the union got the house into liveable condition as quickly as possible. 
So a little group of people whom fate had dealt a hard blow quickly reco\ered from a 
tragedy that could have resulted in untold misery except for tlie Christian spirit of the 
people of tlie community. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



BARRE LOCAL PASSES HALF CENTURY MARK 

A banquet and social party at Elks Hall on the night of February 17th marked the 
fiftieth anniv-ersary of the founding of Local Union No. 481, Barre, Vt. Some hundred 
or more members, friends, and guests were on hand to help the union make its fiftieth 
birthday party a huge success. 

Irman R. Hill, secretary' of the organization, and a member for 38 years, served as 
toastmaster and recalled the early history of local No. 481. He introduced the speaker 
of the evening, William Francis of Boston, general representative. The latter spoke of 
union activities and congratulated the officers and members of the Barre area who still 
formed a strong representation of the carpenters and joiners in New England. 

Toastmaster Hill introduced all of the organization's officers, each of whom offered 
remarks appropriate to the anniversary occasion. He particularly cited some of the older 
members and officers who have rendered long service to the local. In this particular cat- 
egory he commended Harry Holt, who was financial secretarj' and treasurer for about 
27 years, until stricken ill last fall. Odiers who were presented as having long served the 
organization were Frank Colvin, a past president and trustee; Oscar Sla>ton of Mont- 
pelier, secretary, a member since 1901 and secretary for many years; Harlan Maxfield, treas- 
urer and secretary many years, and Henry Holt, long time president and a trustee. 

Oldest members and their date of joining were listed as Charles Rowell and Percy 
Ellenwood, both of South Barre, who joined in 1900; Oscar Slajiion of Montpelier and 
Frank Colvin, 1901; Alex McKenzie of Manchester, N. H., and Bert St. Cyr, 1903; Harlan 
Maxfield, 1905, Henry Lunde, 1906, and Henry Holt of \Mniamstown, 1907. 

The ladies and menfolk of tlie Cobble Hill Grange were caterers and servers of the 
delicious chicken pie supper which preceded the anniversary.' festivities. Ice Cream for 
the large helpings of apple pie, and after-dinner cigars, were donated by the Flint Lumber 
Companj', and a large specially made three-tiered anniversary cake was presented by 
the Allen Lumber Company. Mrs. Lucy Austin had charge of the catering. 

The affair was arranged for by Inin Hill, Robert Batchelder and Harold Thygesen. 



SAN MATEO LOCAL SPONSORS HALF-CENTURY PARTY 

With some 600 members, friends and wives present, Local Union No. 162, San Mateo, 
Cal., on the night of November 2nd celebrated the fiftieth anni\ersary of the granting of its 
charter with a long-to-be-remembered dinner dance. Superb food, good entertainment and 
fine speaking all combined to make the e\ent a successful one. 

Brodier U. S. Simonds, Jr., 
who acted as toast master, in- 
troduced the speakers and spe- 
cial guests to the audience. 
Among those whom he intro- 
duced were: Charles PhilHps, 
President of the Local; Mayor 
Daniel Creedon of San Mateo; 
Mayor Daniel Lo\e of Burfing- 
ame; Joe Cambiano, general 
representative and a member of 
Local No. 162. All gave short 
but informative addresses 
which were thoroughly enjoyed 
by all. However, the real guests 
of honor during the evening 
were Brothers Neal BurweU 
and Bert Miller, the two re- 
maining charter members of 
the local who helped to bring 
it into existence just before the 
turn of the century. The two veterans were given tremendous ovations. The dinner was 
followed by a champagne toast to the charter members. An address by Brother Cambiano 
on the past history of the local and the progress made by the International together with 
an address by C. J. Haggerty, State Federation President, on the need for increased po- 
litical action on the part of labor rounded out the evening. Dancing for young and old 
closed the affair. 




Seated from left to right: Andrew Ew^en, Trustee, Silas 
Hays, Vice-President; Neal BurweU, charter member, J. F. 
Cambiano, Representative; Fred Scroggins, Chas. Phillips, 
President, and James Warren Trustee. 

Standing: Roy Honerlah, Warden; A. H. Eikenkotter, 
Trustee; E. C. Peixton, Recording Secretary; Earl Honerlah, 
Business Agent; Geo. Brunner, Financial Secretary, and 
Fred Gillespie, Warden. 



THE CARPENTER 33 

BEDFORD, INDL4NA, LOCAL CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY 

Local No. 1380, held a chicken supper in honor of its 47th Anniversary, January 6, 1950, 
in the Odd Fellows hall, with an attendance of 76. Included were the wives of members 
and special guests and their wives. The Local was founded Jan. 6, 1903, with 18 members 
t\vo of whom still survive. They are H. ^^'. Green and 01i\er P. Hunter. 

Brother Green was selected Warden when tlie Local was organized and with the 
exception of six months, has held some office in this Local. Brother Hunter has always been 
a very faithful member but was unable to attend our anniversary' due to failing eyesight. 




Brother Green was introduced and presented with a cash token by the President, who 
acted as master of ceremonies. The Brothers who held membership for thirt\' years or 
longer, %\'ere recognized for their long service. 

Special guests of the evening were the Rev. and Mrs. A. N. Corpening. of the Baptist 
Church; Mayor Ivan H. Brinegar and wife; our International Representative, Cecil E. 
Shuev; a reporter of "Bedford Daily Times-Mail" with wife, and Photographer Dick Roberts, 
who proceeded to take a picture of the assembled group. 

The Rev. Corpening gave an inspirational talk on the Carpenter of Nazareth: die Mayor 
spoke briefly and Brother Shuey gave a ver>' interesting talk on the importance of attend- 
ing the meetings of tlie Local. 

Pictures of National Headquarters and of the Home at Lakeland were shown at the 
end of the meeting with vev}' gratifying comment. After viewing the pictures, Mayor 
Brinegar commented that tlie pictmres alone would make one want to become a carpenter. 



OYSTER SUPPER MARKS IL\NNIBAL'S 50th BIRTHDAY 

Over a hundred members of Local Union No. 607, Hannibal, Mo., witli families and 
guests attended a fine oyster supper at Eagles Hall on the night of February' 6tli. The 
occasion was a celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the local union. 

The highlight of the evening's program was when tlie master of cermonies called Joe 
^^'alker to the floor and presented him with a token pin in honor of his 50 years member- 
ship in the organization. 

Joe \^'alker is the only li\ing charter member of tlie Carpenters Union in Hannibal. 
He was present in 1900 when 17 journe>iiien carpenters united to form Local No. 60 1. 

In addition to being the only living charter member, Joe is also the oldest member 
of Local No. 607. He is 82 years old and he still is hving in tlie house on the South Side 
where he was born in 1868. 

In addition to the oyster supper, a fine musical program was carried out. 

I. H. White, chairman, Ernest Chamber, W. S. White, and L. P. Glascock consti- 
tuted the arrangements committee and opinion was unanimous tliat diey did a splendid 
job. The musical program over, tiie tables and chairs were folded and tlie floor cleared 
for dancing. Until a late hour the young and not so >oung danced to the tunes provided 
by a snappy orchestra. 

Good management and ^^'ise leadership enabled Local Union No. 607 to round out 
half a centur>' of active progress and members and oSicers are looking forward to a 
second fifty years of growtli and service. 




AUXILIARY 230 CELEBRATES 20TH ANNIVERSARY 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies' Auxiliary No. 230, Springfield, 111. 

We would like to tell you about our 20th Anniversary dinner, held December 10 at 

6:00 P.M., in I. O. O. F. Hall. There were 62 

present to enjoy the turkey dinner and all the 
trimmings which had been prepared by six of the 
members. Our Auxiliary was organized December 
4, 1929. We still have 9 of our 30 charter mem- 
bers and they were all in attendance but one. We 
had as our special guests, Mr. and Mrs. John Ott. 
Mrs. Ott is one of our charter members, and Mr. 
Ott wears a 50-year membership pin in Carpenters' 
Local 16. They celebrated their 65th wedding 
anniversary last November. 

A short history of our Auxiliary was given by 
the Recording Secretary. This was followed by a short program. 

Our Auxiliary is doing nicely, but we don't get as many new members as we should, 
according to the Carpenters' membership. 

We hold our meetings on the 1st and 3rd Fridays of the month at 2:00 P.M., but we 
meet every Friday all day and quilt. 

We are always glad to ha\'e visitors any time. 

Fraternally, 

Xenia Newlin, Recording Secretary. 




SIOUX CITY LADIES STAGE MEMBERSHIP CONTEST 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all our Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 307, Sioux City, Iowa. 

On February 16, we celebrated our 12th Anniversary with a dinner-dance at the hall of 
Carpenters' Local 948. We meet there on the first and third Thursdays of each month. 

A hard-time party was the highlight of our activities in March. We had fonned two 
teams (the Go-Getters and the Joinettes) for a membership drive. Competition was keen 
and wonderful— it added lots of zip to our meetings. At the termination of the contest, 
we boasted 36 new members, bringing our roll to a total of 87. The hard-time party was 
the treat for tlie Go-Getters, who won by 11 points. The party was given for the Auxiliary 
members and their husbands; the men nearly stole the show with their clever costumes 
and hilarious antics, which included a Kangaroo Court. We feel that these social events 
help the members get acquainted and promote a feeling of geniality. 

We also have Christmas parties, pot-luck suppers, picnics and sewing bees. 

To supplement our finances, we have sold vanilla and shampoo, and have had bazaars 
and bake sales. 

Our roster of officers is as follows: President, Mrs. M. J. Smith; Vice-President, Mrs. 
Gordon Moss; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Anthony Bolchunos; Financial Secretary, Mrs. 
Thos. Cullinan; Conductor, Mrs. Neil De Kok; Warden, Mrs. Geo. Barrett; Trustees, Mrs. 
Richard Downs, Mrs. Marion Stivers and Mrs. Glenn Edwards. 

We ai^e eager to hear what our Auxiliary sisters are doing, so will some members of 
our large "family" please write? 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Anthony Bolchunos, Recording Secretary. 



THE CARPENTER 37 

ENID LADIES SPONSOR BANQUET 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 203 of Enid, Okla., wishes to send Greetings to all Auxiliaries. 

We celebrated our anniversary on Feb. 25, 1950, by having a lovely banquet. Mr. 
Melvin Martin acted as master- of ceremonies. Music was furnished by Mr. Olen Pender- 
graft, steel guitar; Miss Elizabeth Martin, piano, and Lee Goodman, accordion. Members 
and their families were present. 

We now have 24 members and hope to have new ones. We ha\e gained 2 new mem- 
bers recently, and are very proud of oiu charter members. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Lee Goodman, Recording Secretary 



NAPA AUXILIARY GOING STRONG 

The Editor: 
5 For an organization tliat started less tlian a year ago, Ladies' Auxiliary 544 of Napa, 

!i Calif., has received much praise and interest from its large membership. At the present, we 
have about 60 members, of whom 36 are charter members. Four recently initiated ones are 
; Mesdames Marie Cole, Barbara Shram, Anne Hewitt and Bemice Atkinson. We hope that 
j^ with the new drive now being started, we can more tlian double our membership. 
i We meet the 2nd Thursday at the Labor Temple for our business meeting and the 4th 

Tuesday at a member's home for our social evening. 

Our President, Mrs. Alden Luntey, has kept us busily interested all tliese months witli 
her fine leadership— each montli, carrying out a montlily theme, relating to holidays, etc., 
either with a dinner, a party or some health or welfare work, or to raise funds for our 
treasury. We plan to be able to attend the State Convention next year. 

Our officers are: Mrs. Alden Luntey, President; Mrs. Harvey Platmaker, Vice-President; 
Mrs. Nels Hansen, Treasurer and Financial Secretary; Mrs. Herman Long, Recording Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Ray Lake, Mrs. Melvin Krenke, and Mrs. Fred Schoomnaker, Trustees; Mrs. 
James Breshears, Warden, and Mrs. Roy Dimmick, Conductor. 
We will welcome letters from any of our Sister Auxiliaries. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Wayne Hiserman, Publicity Chairman. 



BINGHAMTON AUXILIARY BUYS PL\NO FOR CLUB ROOMS 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all our sister Auxiliaries from AiLxiliary No. 490, Binghamton, New York. 
Our charter was inaugiu-ated on Nov. 13, 1947. Our membership is still small, but is 
growing. Last month, we welcomed three new members and at present we are fonnulating 
plans to increase our membership. 

We hold meetings the 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each montli except dining Jul\- and 
August, when we meet once a montli. The second Thursday is a business meeting and the 
I fourth a social evening. 

We ha\'e a Sunshine Fund and send flo\\'ers and cards to sick members and their fam- 
ilies. This fund is kept in operation by money taken in from our "Pink Elephant," which 
we have at each meeting. 

On December 22, we held our Christmas party for members and their families at which 
; gifts were exchanged and lunch served. 

In January, we drew names for "Secret Pals." Gifts are exchanged witli secret pals on 
special occasions. 

We had a Valentine party on February 23. Each member addressed Valentines to otlier 
I members and the men who attend our social gatherings. Recei\'er of tlie cards paid tlie 
\ amount of postage marked on tlie card. This money was put in our Sunshine Fund. 

After our meeting on March 22, we held a farewell party for one of our lo>al and faith- 
ful members, Mrs. Florence Reed, who is going to Hve in Spokane, Wash. She recei\ed a 
{ gift from each member and a gift from the Auxiliary was presented to Mr. and Mrs. Reed. 
We contribute to civic and charitable organizations and help any member in distress. 
Our most recent activity was the purchase of a piano for our club room. 
We would appreciate ideas and suggestions. 

Fraternalh', 

Leali Kelly, Recording Secrctar>'. 

i 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



PORT ALBERNI IS ONLY ACTWE B. C. AUXILIARY 

The Editor: 

Greetings from Ladies' Auxiliary No. 517, Port Alberni, B. C, Canada. 
We organized in No\ember, 1947, and had our charter installed one year later by 
Brother Wm. Page, International Representative. On this occasion, we had a birthday 

celebration with many guests from vari- 
ous Locals on Vancouver Island and the 
mainland of British Columbia. 

At present we are tlie only active 
Auxiliary' in British Columbia, and have 
on our membership roll a number of out- 
of-town members, both men and women. 
These members attend meetings when- 
ever possible and assist the Auxiliary in 
various capacities. 

We hold meetings once a month on 
the same night as Local 513. At the con- 
clusion of the meetings we serve lunch 
to both groups and ha\'e a social hour. 
This get-together seems to add a great 
deal in tlie way of fellowship. 
Our acti\ities include visiting any sick of the Auxiliary as well as the Brotherhood. 
Also, when required, we do welfare \A'ork among our own members. 

This p^st Christmas, we held a party for the children of Union Carpenters. With an 
attendance of upwards of 200, a veiy enjoyable evening was spent with a Christmas tree, 
Santa Claus, gifts and candy. 

We raise funds chiefly by dues and raifles. We are at present working on an afghan as a 
group project. 

Fraternall}', Lois Tassie, Recording Secretary. 




TORONTO LADIES SPONSOR ^L4NY GOOD TIMES 

The Editor: 

Friendly greetings to all Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 303, Toronto, Canada. 

Six months have elapsed since our last chat through "The Carpenter" and we have 
achie\ed quite a lot of activities since then. 




Our big e\ent for tlie year of 1949 was our bazaar which was held November 24, at 
The Sons of England Hall. This proved to be a big success. Besides being able to reim- 
burse our treasury, we were able to send some of the proceeds to the Children's Hospitals, 
enabling them to have a little extra good cheer for Christmas; also, to tlie children of 
Europe through the "Canadian Save the Children Fund." 

At intervals during the year, we gather up good used clotliing for this same source; also, 
knit or make little garments and needs for new babies. 

We had a lovely Christmas party for our members' children and grandchildren. 

We celebrated our thirteenth birtliday Feb. 24, 1950, by having a banquet in the King 
Edward Hotel, Toronto, ha\1ng as guests, our husbands, who, needless to say, are Brothers 
of Local 27, Toronto. There was no formality; therefore we enjoyed ourselves like one 
big family. 

^Ve meet on tlie second Thursday of every month for our business meeting and every 
fourth Thursday for our social activities. 

Fraternally, Doris E. Thorogood, Secretary. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 



By PI. H. Siegele 
LESSON 260 

Difference in Height of Walls.— The walls 
supporting an irregular pitch hip roof with 
a cornice must be built to accomodate 
tlie diflFerent pitches of tliat roof. For in- 
stance, you have an irregular pitch hip 
roof, in which a one-fourtli pitch and a one- 
half pitch are used, with the cornice over- 
hanging one foot. The difference in the 
height of the walls would be the difference 




•^11 Fig. 1 

il found in the two rises for the width of tlie 
cornice, or in this case, for a one-foot over- 
hang, it would be 6 inches. This problem 
and problems that accompany it will be 
covered in this lesson. 

Irregular Hip Roof Plan.— Fig. 1 shows 
an irregular hip roof plan, on which the 




problems of this lesson are based. Two 
dotted-line squares are shown applied to 
tlie drawing. The one to the bottom left, is 
apphed to a part of the roof that has regu- 
lar hips, while the square to the right is 



applied to the plan where the hip roof is 
irregular. The dotted hues show the rela- 
tionship of tlie outside walls to the roof. 
At A and A is shown how tlie seats of die 




valleys come to one side of the angle. At 
B is shown how tlie seat of tlie hip is offset 
from the corner, while at C and C tlie hips 
come directly over tlie corners, because the 
pitch of this part of tlie roof is regular. 

Run, Rise and Rafter.— Fig. 2 shows die 
same roof plan shown in Fig. 1, giving tlie 
run, the rise, and the rafter of. A, an irregu- 
lar valley, B, an irregular hip, and C, a 
regular hip. The difference in the height of 
the walls is pointed out at a and b with 
double indicators. Study the drawing. 




Fig. 4 
Details of Difference in Heiglit of ^^'alls. 
—Fig. 3 shows a dotted-line square applied 
to the tail of a common rafter of tlie steep 
pitch shown in Fig. 2, using 12 on tlie 
blade and tlie rise of the pitch on tlie 
tongue. The tail of the common rafter for 
the lower pitch is shown by dotted lines. 
Here again, 12 is used on the blade of die 
square and die rise of tliis pitch on die 
tongue, as shown. The points diat should 
be watched are the distances a and a, 
which must be tiie same. The distance 
marked b, is the difference in the height 
of the walls. The top of tlie rafter tails 
must meet at point 12 on die blade of die 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



square, as shown. In practice these points 
meet only in elevation. 

Fig. 4 shows a little different way to ob- 
tain the same results. Here a detail of the 




Fig. 5 C^ 

cornice is given of each of the pitches. The 
distances at a and a, again must be the 
same. Two ways of getting the difference 
in the height of tlie walls are sho\\"n at 
b and b. Study and compare Figs. 3 and 4. 
They deal wddi the same problem. 

Seat and Tail of Irregular Hip Rafter.— 
Fig. 5 shows a detail in plan of tlie irregu- 
lar hip rafter tail, shown to the right in 
Fig. 2. The comer of tlie cornice is shown 
off center on the tail. The dotted-Hne 
square shows why tliis is so— die two be\"els 
must fntersect tlie side comers of tlie tail 
exacth" square across from each other. This 
keeps tlie two upper comers of tiie tail cut 
on tlie same ele\"ation. If the comer of die 
comice would center the tail of tlie hip, tlie 
two side corners would come at different 
elevations. 



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How to obtain die points for marking the 
edge be\el for the hip seat cut, is shown by 
Fig. 6. The diagram shows a right-angle 
triangle representing the run, rise, and 
lengdi of rafter (tail) as if it were lying on 
die side. The side wall line is extended, as 
sho^^'n bj' dotted line, gi^■ing the tangent 




Fig. 6 

point on the tongue of the square. The 
rafter lengdi is transferred with, the com- 
pass to the seat line, as shown by the part- 
circle. Now die rafter length taken on the 
blade of die square and die tangent on the 




Fig. 7 5 ^ 

tongue ^^■ill gi^'e the edge bevel of the seat— 
the rafter lengdi giving die bevel. Because 
die rafter lengdi, as shown, is longer than 
die blade, both the rafter lengdi and die 
tangent should be divided by 2. which will 
give a reduced rafter length and tangent to 
use on die square. 

Fig. 7 slio\^'s a detail in plan, of the ir- 
regular hip tail, giving three views of the 
seat cut. At A die tail is shown in place; 



THE CARPENTER 



41 



at B it is shown on the side, giving a view 
of the seat and tail cuts; at C is a bottom 
view, looking straight at it, and at D is the 




Fig. 8 l\ 

other side view. In other words, if you will 
imagine that what is shown at D is rolled 




Fig. 9 

back to position A, you will have the right 
idea. The cornice is indicated by dotted 
lines. 

Seat and Tail of Irregular Valley Rafter.— 
Fig. 8 shows a detail in plan of the valley 
rafter tail, shown at the center in Fig. 2. 



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If this detail is compared with the one 
shown in Fig. 5, it will be seen that the 
valley tail cut and the hip tail cut are 
exactly in reverse order. In both instances, 
however, the tail cuts intersect with the 
side corners square across from each other, 
as the dotted-line squares show. 

Fig. 9 shows a right-angle triangle rep- 
resenting the run, rise and rafter of the 



EARN BIG PROFITS 

SHARPENING AND RETOOTHING SAWS 



Gain INDEPEND- 
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part time SAW 
SHOP BUSINESS 
OF YOUR OWN. 
Burr's precision saw 
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t better, faster Job, and re- 
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guarantee. WRITE FOR 
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Write For Valuable Book 
Send 2-')C In coin for 
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saw .=;liop rliarees and 
other raluable informa- 
tion. 




BURR MFG. CO., 



Dept. C-5, 8945 V 



WUV SlfOULDiV'T YOLI TOO 



BE WEALTHY 

THAT IDEA OF YOURS MAY BE 
WORTH A FORTUNE IF PROPERLY 
HANDLED. LEARN THE INTEREST- 
ING FACTS ABOUT CONCEPTION, 
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APPRAISING, DRAFTING OF 
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PATENTED OR UNPATENTED. 

ONE HUNDRED PAGES OF TEXT 
POSTPAID, LIMITED TIME, $1.00 




15 CHAPTERS 

Salisfaction Giiarjnleed 



ADDRESS- C. C. PALMER 
1709 W. COMMONWEALTH AVE., ALHAMBRA. CALIF. 



You Need an 

EMPIRE for 

Top-level Craftsmanship'. 



EMPIRE stands for extreme accuracy 
wherever good levels are used — and 
that's why craftsmen by the thousands 
consider it their first and only level. 
When you use Model 151. illustrated, 
you'll know the advantages of inter- 
changeable vials, accurate adjustments 
for pitch work, precision machined 
edges and easily read marks. Have 
your dealer show you Model 151 and 
other EMPIRE Levels, or write for 
details. 

Extreme g^riji p i isS?, 
Accuracy 



EMPIRE LEVEL MFG. COMPANY 



10930 W. Potter Rd., Dept. TC. Milwaukee 13, Wi$. 



^ 



42 



THE CARPENTER 



cornice, as if Ijdng on the side. In order to 
get this, the side of the wall under the steep 
pitch must be extended, as shown by dotted 
line, from c to d. Then make the rise equal 




Fig. 10 



to tlie rise of the steep pitch for the width 
of the cornice, in this case a foot run, and 
draw in the rafter hne. Now where the run 
line crosses the outside line of the wall, 
draw a perpendicular Hne, to point a. 'With 
a compass set at the toe, transfer the rafter 
lengtli from point a to point b. Now the 
tangent and the rafter length, as sho\\Ti 
will give the edge bevel of the valley seat— 
the rafter length giving the bevel. 

Fig. 10 is a detail in plan, showing the 
valley tail and three \iews of the seat and 
tail cuts. At A the valley is shown in po- 
sition, at B is shown a side \iew, at C is a 
bottom view, looking straight at the rafter, 



EVERY CARPENTER NEEDS AN 

' ACE KUTTER 

CUTS — NOTCHES — PUNCHES all 
sizes of Asbestos Siding and Shingles. 
All Steel— Lightweight— Ea«] 
to operate — Lasts ■ 
lifetime. 




$4.95 each 

In lots of 6 or 
more: $4.15 each. 
All prices f.o.b 
factory. Ft. 
Worth, Texas. 
Send only $1.00 for each Reduced from $II.S5 

cutter and pay balance Guaranteed against defec- 
C. O. D. or send check or live materials and work- 
money order In full. manehip. 

Address all inquiries to 

ROWLANDS >1FG. & SALES CO. 

712 Broadus St. Ft. Worth 10, Texas 



and at D is tlie other side \iew. Now im- 
agine that you are rolling what is shown at 
D, back to position A, and you will have a 
good idea of the three views. 

HOW TO CUT RAFTERS 



It's new . . . NOW 

New vest pocket books gives lengths, side cuts, plumb | 
cuts, deductions, for all rafters any building from one 
inch to forty feet wide. Gives nimibers to cut on 
square. All standard pitches from IJ" to 12 up to 17j 
and 12 rise. Any one can frame a roof with this grea: 
book. Just open book to your pitch page and there in 
plain print is your lengths cuts and deductions for any 
pitched roof. Also gives how to figure elevations. How 
to figure lumber. How to lay out window and door 
openings. 'Written by Harry (Dad) Bleam and it's a 
dandy. Price only $2.00 each. 

STRINGER LAYOUTS. ^ c\''^h^'¥: 

Its a simplified stair builders manual; Its a lay out book 
for carpenters that want a simple way to iay out stair car- 
riages and stringers. Just plain talk with illustrations that 
a worker can understand. Xo trigcnome-ry, obt'jse angles or 
other high fluting talk. Xot written for a iiair builder, but 
rather for the man who has little time to throw up a stair 
carriage and trot al ong w ith his other w ork , simple, con- 
cise, and practical. THE BEST FOR THE MOXEY. 72 
pages, size 4% x 6^ inches. Its a dandy says everyone that 
has It. Price ?2.0<J. Tliis is anotl.tr cf 'Dad Bleam'i 
Books." 

CARPENTRY ESTIMATING 
If you are an apprentice estimator you will want this man- 
ual on carpentry estimating by "Dad Bleam." Is just the 
McCoy for the person starting out to do estimating work. 
Gives costs in carpenter hours. Gives simple and easy to 
understand carpentry mathematics. Plenty of charts and s 
swell value, you will like this one if you want to learn. 
Price $2.00 




STEP BY STEP HOUSE FRAMING DETAILS 

Step by step house framing details is another of the 
"Dad Bleam manuals." It's crammed full of house fram- 
ing illustrations, from the laying out of the foundation to 
top of roof. Price $2.00 

^ BUILDERS' TOPICS 



1512 Market St. 



Seattle 7, Wash. 
NOTICE— ALL THE ABOVE FOUR MANUALS WILL 
BE SENT TO ANY ADDRESS AT SPECIAL PRICE OF 
$4 00 YOU SAVE $4.00. 



STAIR GAGES 

(Angle Gages) 

The handiest Utile devices you ever 
had in your tool box. Easily carried 
in the pocket. Used on square for 
laying out angle cuts on rafters, stair 
stringers, etc. 1^" hexagon brass 
with plated steel screw. Rust proof 
and will last a lifetiir.e. Ordertoday! 
\Vt. 4 oz. pr. 
Money back if not satisfied 

$1.00 Postpaid 

WELLIVER & SONS 
P. O. Box 278C 
Rockford, Illinois 





HANDY DROP-KLAMP 

Carpenter's Floor Vise 



For upright vising of doors, windows, boards, plywood. The weight of 
the object closes the clamp. Only one is needed, even for the heaviest 
door. Fiber-board liner set in 12-gauge steel prevents scratching. Mount 
once on a small board — no more installing to dol 9% X 7", weighs % 
pounds. If your dealer can't supply, order direct $4.95 postpaid. Money 
back if not satisfied. Dealer inquiries invited. 

LAKESHOREMFG.CO. • 428-G 2nd Ave. S. • Minneapolis!, Minn. 




IT'S THE H-066 
FOR HANDY "HOOK-OVER 
MEASURING! 

Patented sturdy metal end-hook 
makes the H-066 ideal for work 
beyond arm's length. Zero falls 
exactly at inside of hook that's 
riveted clear- through. Hook 
sets solidly against metal cap 
for "hook-over" measuring — 
neatlyfolds away forall gen- 
eral measuring. Check these 
finer features; 

• Solid brass concealed spring joints. 

• Lock joints reduce end-play for accuracy. 

• Hardwood ys-in. wide, 6-in. sections. 

• Marked consecutive inches to 16lhs on both 
sides, both edges. 

• Red ends — the mark of finest quality. 

See it— Buy it -at Your Hardware or Too/ Sloro 

^uu iUFK IN 

^ ' m^ O 

THE LUFKIN RULE CO. • TAPES • RULES • PRECISION TOOLS 
SAGINAW, MICHIGAN • NEW YORK CITY • BARRIE, ONTARIO 




The Greatest 

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Value Ever Offered 



New • Powerful 
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Weighs only 12 lbs. 
For Right or 
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Light, safe and easy to 

handle. Equipped with 

ball and needle bearings throughout. Capacity on 

straight cuts 11/16" to 3"; 45 degree bevel cuts 

to 1%" 

Furnished with combination blade, choice of right 
or left blade and 115V or 230V AC-DC motor. Ton 
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powerful models with 2" to 4-V2" capacities. 

32 Factory-Owned Service Stations from Coast to 
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1000 Mall Portable Power Tools for a million jobs. 
A dealer in any town can supply you. 

See your f^ordwore Dealer TODAY or write for 
FREE catalog "Mall Portable Power Tools." 



MALL TOOL COMMNY 

7751 South Chicago Ave. •Chicago 19, ILL. 




MODEL 87 57395 




SAVE A DAY 



ELIASON STAIR GAUGE 

1. Measures tread or riser 

(above) 

2. Marks board for perfect fit 
the first time (right) 

Dealers and Agents Wanted 

ELIASON TOOL COMPANY 



or 
more 
on Every Staircase You Build 

ELIASON STAIR GAUGE in 10 seconds gives 
j-oii both correct length and angle of stair 
treads, ri^er^. closet shelves, etc., ready to 
mark board. Each end piv- 
ots and locks at any length 
or angle. Adjustable from 
20" up. Saves a day or more, 
increases your profits $20 
or more on each staircase. 
Fully guaranteed. Only 
$12.95 cash with order, or 
C. O. D. plus postage. Order 
Today, or send for circular. 

2121 E. 56th St., MINNEAPOLIS 17, MINN. 




FOR YEARS OF FAST CUTTING 



ASK FOR SANDVIK HANDSAWS 




Mode of the finest Swedish Char- 
coal Steel, SANDVIK HANDSAWS 
hold their set and edge tONGER. 

• Sandvik's exclusive handio 
is made for the professional 
carpenter . . . MAN-SIZED FOR 
COMFORT. 

• Their perfect balance makes 
cutting EASIER. 

• Their exceptionally high 
crown makes cutting FASTER. 

• Sandvik Saws are fully 
tapered. 

• Best of all you'll be proud 
to own one. 

Ask your Dealer for Sandvik Sows 



r^^ORFT^y WARREN STREET, N. Y. 



*!M»S«3*£%L-»i5K^ ■** 




FASTENING DEVICES 
for EVERY PURPOSE 

Whatever your hanging or fastening problem 
is, Paine has the answer. Paine's complete 
line, with a full range of sizes and stj'les, in- 
cludes the famous Spring Wing Toggle Bolts, 
Expansion Anchors, Fixture Hangers, Clamps, 
Hanger Iron and a host of other handy devices 
that help you do your job better and easier. 

WK/rC FOR CATAIO* 

THE PAINE CO. 



2967 CARROLL AVE., CHICAGO 12, III. 



THf BfST CRAFTSMEN KlV/AyS TAKE PAINE'S 




CARPENTERS 
HANDBOOK 

consists of short but practical 
rules for laying out roofs, ceil- 
ings, hoppers, stairs and arches 
(vith tables of board measure, 
length of common, hip. valley 
and jack rafterSj square meas- 
ure, etc. — also, rules for kert- 
ing, laying off gamhrel roof and 
explaining the steel square. 
Money back if not satisfied 

$1.00 postpaid 

D. A. ROGERS 

5344 Clinton Ave. 
Minneapolis 9, Minn. 






t^>^ 



S^Sy-vg^- 




That extra length you've always wanted... 120 inches of accu- 
rate, more useful measuring ease. Jet black_marlcings on a 
weor-reslstant, acid-resistant snow white blade. Carlson quality 
throughout with famous 1 0-second blade change economy and 
the new convenient swing-lip . . .a real value at YOUR HARD- 
WARE DEALER. Just be sure it's the While Chief by Carlson. 
P.S. And don't forget to get on extra blo'de as a "spare." 
Blade produced under Pat. No. 20S9209 

Carlson Steel Tape Rules 



CARLSON & SULLIVAN, INC. 

MONROVIA, CALIFORNIA 



^ot-^ 




. ^ HANG THAT DOOR 
THE PROFESSIONAL WAY! 



clean-cut. deeply-etched profile on door. 

•liips. Bepeat operation on jamb. Hang 

Xo adjustments. Xo fussing. Precision made. 

forged, heat-treated steel. Comes in 3". SJ" 

.Std) sizes. 



ONLY $1.75 ea. — 13.50 a pair 
(any two) — $5.25 complete set 
of tliFPe. If dealer can't supply, 
send only SI. 00 with order and 
pav postman balance plus post- 
age C. O. D. In Canada. .25c 
higher per order. No C. O. D. 
State sizes wanted. 



USERS PRAISE 
HIGHLY 

"Really a help for the 
'old hands' and almoat 
a 'muBf for the new 
boys." 

S. H. Glover 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

"The greatest help in 
hanging doors I have 
erer £een." 

J. Allen Cliarles 
Mullins. S. C. 



Comes With 
Leatherette uase 



Coucpapa b.v carpenters to be almost indispensable, 
as hundreds of testimonials in file show. 
(."E-Z Mark" Trade Mark Reg.) 



E-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377 Dept. C, Los Angeles 16, Cal. 



I 

har 

I 




YOU DO THIS 



Clip and mail handy order form below. 



E-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377, Dept. C. 
Los Angeles 16, Calif. 

Gentlemen: Please send the following "E-Z" Mark Butt Gauges as checked below: 

Check Size 

[j one of any size ST. 75 

^ two of any size S3. 50 

n complete set of three any size $5.25 

I enclose check or money order l] 

Send C. O. D D 



Name:__ 
Address: 
State: 



City Zone. 





Air t^n<M^ /i^ (^f 

with New AMERICAN ZV^" SAW 

Here's the sweetest handling Saw you've ever used — the sensa-? 
tional new American! See it — try it — compare! Big capacity — 
^y-i' blade. Big power G.E. motor develops 2^8 H.P. Top 
speed cutting, any position . . . for wood, stone, tile, sheet metal, 
compositions. No jolt — no twist when starting — balanced torque 
principle. Saves time, saves labor, cuts costs! Send coupon for 
details and FREE demonstration. 




If you like 
fine tools 

...then you'll really enjoy the smooth, 
fast action of the "GREENLEE 22" 
Solid-Center Auger Bit. And you know 
it reaches you "factory sharp," 
for each is Plasiic-Sealed with a special 
protective coating. Ask your hardware 
dealer for "GREENLEE 22." 



GREENLEE 



SPECIAL OFFER . . . WOODWORKING 
CALCULATOR. ..104. Quick solutions to 
countless problems... converting linear 
to board feet, nail and bit sizes, etc. Send 10c to 
Greenlee Tool Co., 2085 Columbia Ave., Rockford, III. 

Ctffs fflosf ANYTHING 




Blade turns and 
locks in 8 
positions 



most 
ANYWHERE 



^ 



^ 



New rotatable blade 
metal-cutting Keyhole 

Saw — Steel, iron, nails, 
bolts, pipes, wood, plas- 
ter, metal lath — they're 
all one to Millers Falls new 
metal-cutting Keyhole Saw. 
Works swell in corners and 
ramped quarters. Ends 
skinned knuckles. Flexible, 
tough "Tuf-Flex" alloy steel 
blade — easily interchangeable. 
Get one today — only $2.00 at 
your hardware dealer's. Extra 10 
or 24 tooth blades, 50^ each. 



MILLERS FALLS 
TOOLS 



MILLERS FALLS 
COMPANY 



GREENFIELD 
MASS. 



NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reserve the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted svbject to the above 
reserved rights of the publishers. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

The American Floor Surfacing 

Machine Co., Toledo, Ohio__ 45 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 4th Cover 

Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 41 

Carlson & Sullivan, Inc., Mon- 
rovia, Cal. 44 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 48 

Dominion Sales Co., Inc.. New 

York, N. Y 41 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 43 

Empire Level Mfg. Co., Milwau- 
kee, Wis. . 41 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 44 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 48 

Greenlee Tool Co., Rockford, 

111. 46 

Heston & Anderson, Fairfield, la. 1 

Lakeshore Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 42 

The Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 43 

Mall Tool Co., Chicago, 111 43 

Miller Falls Co., Greenfield, Mass. 46 

Nicholas Wire & Aluminum Co. 

Davenport, Iowa 8 

The Paine Co., Chicago, 111 44 

C. C. Palmer, Alhambra, Calif.— 41 

Rowland Mfg. & Sales Co.. Ft. 

Worth, Tex 42 

Sandvik Saw & Tool Corp., New 

York, N. Y. 43 

Skilsaw, Inc., Chicago, 111. 2nd Cover 

Speedcor Products Portland, Ore. 47 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, Conn. 3rd Cover 

Welliver & Sons, Rockford, III. 42 

Carpentry Materials 

E. L. Bruce Co., Memphis, Tenn.3rd Cover 
The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._ 6 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, Chi- 
cago, 111. 47 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Builders Topics Seattle, Wash. 42 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

A. Riechers, Palo Alto, Calif 47 

D. A. Rogers, Minneapolis, Minn. 44 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. 40 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y 7 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo— 48 



Wearing Apparel 

Co., Los An- 



Brownstein-Louis 
geles, Cal. 

Albert H. Weinbrenner Co., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is V2 
inch rise to 12 inch run. Pitches in- 
crease V2 inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 2 4" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is % inch and they increase 
1/4" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9i/4" wide. Pitch 
is TV2" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks jj^ Qj^j, MINUTE 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 

Getting th« lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 &. 1944 Copyrights. 

Price $2.50 Postpaid. If C. O. D. pay $2.85. 

Californians Add 8c. Money back privilege. 

Canadians use Money Orders. 



A. RIECHERS 



p. O. Box 405 



Palo Alto, Calif. 



jt:(ir^m\ 7!:^ <\Y|U2th Edition for 

'^^'^m\ \ •^VvlJ EXAMINATION 

~ SEND NO MONEY 

Learn to draw plant, estimate, be a Uve-irlre builder, do 
remodeling, take contracting jobs. These 9 practical, pro- 
fusely Illustrated books cover subjects that will help you 
to get more work and make more money. Masonry, con- 
crete forms, carpentry, steel square, roof framing, construc- 
tion, plumbing, heating, painting, decorating and many 
other subjects. More than 4000 pages— 2750 illustrations. 

BETTER JOBS -■ BETTER PAY "P-^°-?i^S 

A nationwide building boom is in full ED I T I O N 
swing and trained men are needed. These books art 
Big opportunities are always for MEN the most up-to- 
WHO KNOW HOW. These books sup- date and complete 
ply quick, easily understood training and we have ever pub- 
handy, permanent reference Information Ushed on these 
Ihat helps solve building problems. many subjects. 
Coupon Brings Nine Big Books For Examination 

tMERICAlTTECHNiCAr SOciirY Publishers slUc" 1898 

Dept. G-536 Drexel at 58th Street, Chicago 37, III. 
You may ship me the TJp-to-Date edition of your nine 
big books, "Building, Estimating, and Contracting" with- 
out any obligation to buy. I will pay the delivery charges 
only, and If fully eatisSed in ten days, I will send you 
$2.00. and after that only $3.00 a month, until the total 
price of only $34.80 Is paid. I am not obligated In any 
way unless I keep the books. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Attach letter stating age, occupation, employer's name and 
address, and name and address of at least one business 
man as reference. Men in service, also give home address. 



SPBBVCOn TOOLS z 



IVUC SAVS YOU 
TtME ANPMONev 




SPEED SAW FILER 
Now file your own saws! Precision fil- 
ing easy without experience. Two sim- 
ple adjustments. Keeps any hand saw 
extra sharp and true cutting. Complete 
with file and ready to use $2.95 



SPEED GRIP PLANE 
Precision made, pocket sized plane 
as easy to grip as big one. S'A" 
X 11/4" face. Can't be beat for all 
around fittingand finishing. Blade 
guaranteed to hold edge. $1.95 




DRILL GRINDER 

Makes old drills cut like new. 
Sharpens 3/32" to \W drills with 
factory accuracy in 30 sees. No ex- 
perience necessary. Use with hand 
or power grinding wheels. S2.95 




srctL 

Holds files, razor blades, taps, drills, 
Allen wrenches, bits etc. Operates 
similar to drill chuck. Precision 
made. Handiest tool in tool box. Jl 





SPEED SAW CLAMP 
Grips full length of hand saws — 30 inches. 
Saves time. Attached or released from bench 
in 15 seconds. Lifetime construction. Holds 
entire saw true without vibration. $4.95 



CIRCULAR SAW FILER 

Sharpen circular saws like an 
expert. Adjustable for any pitch 
or angle. Complete with file and 
mandrels for blades with '/»". 
Va", %", 13/16" centers. $6.95 



Order Today! Cash with order, prepaid. COD postage extra. Money baek Guarantee 



SPEEDCOR PRODUCTS 



Dept.A«512N.E. 73rd Ave. 
Portland 16, Oregon 



YOUR skill 
helped by 

skill 










Skilled Disston veterans put Disston Saws through scores of tests 

Work faster and easier, save material, do 

less sharpening, by using Disston Saws. They're 

made of Disston Steel with Disston Skill. That 

means strictly uniform hairdness and temper, true 

taper grind, tooth edges that last longer — plus 

balance and flex that carpenters say is "just right." 

The economy that comes from quahty has made Disston 

the saw most carpenters use. 

HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC., 504 Tacony, Philadelphia 35, Pa., U.S. A. 

In Canada, write: 2-20 Fraser Ave., Toronto 3, Ont. 




^mabA 



$20 to $30 a Week 

^XXRf>. MONEY'. 



With the high prices of food, clothing and ererything 
else, just think what you could do with extra money 
every week: Turn your spare time into CASH — sliarp- 
ening saws with a Foley Automatic Saw Filer pays up 
to $2 or $3 an hour. Start in your basement or garage 
— no experience necessary. "Tlie first saw I sharpened 
with my Foley Filer came out 10(K', '■—writes Clarence 
E. Parsons. Xo Canvassing— "I advertised in our local 
paper and got in 93 saws" — says M. L. Thompson. 
With a Foley you can file all hand saws, also band and 
crosscut circular saws. 

FREE BOOK 

Shows How To Start 

"Independpnce After 
40'' explains how you 
can get business from 
home owners, farmers, 
carpenters, schools, fac- 
tories, etc. "I get ^^____„- 
•vork from 20 and W ->'- 
30 miles away" '' 
says Charles H. 
Smith. Investigate 
— no salesman will 
call — send coupon 
today. 



Se^ ^fMfuui 'Pf^x FREE BOOK 



FOLEY MFG. CO., 518-0 Foley Bidg., Minneapolis 18, Minn. 

Send FREE BOOK— "Independence After 40" 




.N'ame 
Address 



LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

If you are ambitious to have your own busi- 
ness and be your own boss tbe "Tamblirn 
System" Home Study Course in Estimating 
will start you on your way. 

If you are an experienced carpenter and 
have had a fair schooling in reading, writing 
and arithmetic you can master our System 
in a short period of your spare time. The 
first lesson begins with excavations and step 
by step instructs you how to figure tbe cost 
of complete buildings just as you would do 
it in a contractor's office. 

By the use of this System of Estimating you 
avail yourself of the benefits and guidance of 
the author's 40 years of practical experience 
reduced to the language you understand. 
You will never find a more opportune time 
to establish yourself in business than now. 

Study the course for ten days absolutely 
free. If you decide you don't want to keep 
it, just return it. Otherwise send us $8.75 
and pay the balance of $30.00 at $7.50 per 
month, making a total of $38.75 for the com- 
plete course. On request we will send you 
plans, specifications, estimate sheets, a copy 
of the Building Labor Calculator, and com- 
plete instructions. What we say about this 
course is not important, but what you find it 
to be after you examine it is the only thing 
that matters. You be the judge; your deci- 
sion is final. 

Write your name and addres^ clearly and 
give your age, and trade experience. 

TAMBLYN SYSTEM 

1115 So. Pearl St., C-41, Denver 10, Colo. 



fyr fine work 



— • ALL THE BEST IDEAS of skilled workers in 
wood for over 70 years have been built into 
these Stanley Planes. Naturally they feel 
right and work right. Stanley Tools, 163 Elm 
Street, New Britain, Connecticut 

TH E TOOL BOX OF THE WOR LD 

[STANLEY] 

Reg. U.S. Pal. OfF. 

HARDWARE • TOILS ■ ELECTRIC TOOLS 
STEEL STRAPPING - STEEL 




No 5 Plane 



BRUCE 

Hardwood Flooring 

BLOCK • PLANK • STRIP 




Tenn. 



» Co., lAemphv 




AUDELS Carpenters 
and Builders Guides 

4vois.$6 




InsldeTrade Inf ermatioa 

for Carpenters. Baildera, Join- 
ers, Building Mechanics and all 
Woodworkers. These Goid<<a 
give yon the short-cat Instmb- 
tions that yoo want— inclodin* 
new methods, ideas, solationl, 
plans, systems and money amv- 
tng suggestions. An easy pro- 
gressive course for the appren- 
tice and student. A practical 
daily helper and Qui(i Refer- 
ence for the master workef. 
Carpenters everywhere are a»» 
ing these Guides as a Helping 
Hand to Easier Work, Better 



Inside Trade Information On: 

How to use the steel square — How to file and 

set saws — How to build lumlture— How to use 

a mitre box — How to use the chalk line — How 

to use rules and scales — How to malie joints — 

Carpenters arithmetic— Solving mensuration 

problems — Estimating strength ol timbers — 

How to set girders and sills — How to frame 

houses and roofs — How to estimate costs — How 

to build houses, bams, garages, bungalows, etc. 

— How to read and draw plans — Drawing up 

specifications — How to excavate — How to use 

settings 12 13 and 17 on the steel square — How 

to build hoists and scaSolds — skylights — How 

to build stairs — How to put on interior trim — . 

How to hang doors — How to lath — lay floors — How to P&^t. 

■mMMB— —■■■■■■■■■■■—— —**^' — '**** ** * " **"^^'**" * "***'** 

AUDEL, Publishers, 49 W. 23rd St., New York 10, N. Y. 

Mail Audels Carpenters and Builders Guides, 4 vp'.s.. on 7 da}'!' fry 
trial. If OK I will remit $1 in Todays and $1 monthly uirtll $6 U.paW. 
-Otherwise I will return them. No obligation unless I am satistlco. 

Nam e ~* 




Occupation- 



Employed by- 



CAB 




them for life! 




ATKINS No. 400 

America's Finest Saw 

The saw any carpenter is proud to own— 
o tribute to his judgment and knowledge 
of fine tools! The blade of the Atkins 
No. 400 is crafted of the finest steel ever 
perfected for sawing purposes . . . tem- 
pered by Atkins' own methods for the 
utmost in edge-holding qualities . . . and 



Have you seenjh^ 



NEW J'- 65? 



^^■^■rTTTtomous ATKINS 
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o saw e^P^^'f y,,"^:, o big odvontoge. 
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true-taper ground for easy clearance. 
Solid rosewood handle in "Perfection" 
pattern prevents wrist strain and directs 
the full force of each easy stroke 
against the fast-cutting teeth, in ship 
pattern, rip or cut-off, 24 and 26 -inch 
lengths. 




ATKINS No. 65 



Tried-and-true, long-time friend of thousands of car- 
penters. A fine quality 'Silver Steel" saw. True-taper 
ground, carefully tempered and fitted with "Perfec- 
tion" pattern apple handle. Ship pattern; 20, 24 and 
26-inch lengths. 



E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY 

Home Office and Factory: 

402 So. Illinois St., Indianapolis 9, Indiana 

Branch Factory: Portland, Oregon 

Knife factory: Lancaster, New York 

Branch Offices: Atlanta • Chicago • New Orleans • New York 




EDUB 




MPENTER 



FOUNDED 1881 

Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 

JUNE, 1950 ~ 




g^ ^5^5^5^5^5^y^^?5^5^y5^5^ff:y5^^^ 



^OH^ Mf4%/ 




Be sure your 
Local Union 
books a showing 
of these two 
United Brother- 
hood films — 



THIS IS YOUR BROTHERHOOD 



and 



CARPENTERS HOME 



5\3v3srNJv£N>.3VX>>9v> 



Produced by authorization of the General Executive Board, 
these two films— in color and sound— show the General Office in 
action and the Lakeland Home taking care of old time members. 
There is no charge for the use of these films. They are loaned out 
by the General Office on a first come, first served basis, to Locals, 
Councils and Auxiliaries. If you haven't seen these films, urge your 
Local Union to book a showing as soon as possible. Take it up at 
the next meeting. Full details may be obtained by dropping a 
note to: 

Maurice A. Hutcheson, 

First General Vice-President, 

Carpenters Bldg,, 222 E. Michigan St. 
Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 



C,^^gsS^C^C^c^C^C^CN4^C^e^^^ 



RIGHTFULLY, THESE JOBS 
BELONG TO YOU! 



Look up! Look at the cracked ceil- 
ings in your commiuaity! See for your- 
self what independent siu*veys show! 

Two out of every three homes have one 
or more rooms with cracked ceilings in 
need of repair. 

Then remember — ^patching 
and makeshift plaster repairs 
seldom are satisfactory — 
seldom last. 

Remember — only you, as 
a carpenter, have the needed 
skill to fix those ceilings so 
they will never crack again.^ 
Only you can apply beautiful 
Upson Kuver-Krak Panels — 
right over unsightly and luisafe plaster 
— and give deHghted home owners the 
world's finest ceiling. 

Rightfully, these fobs 
belong to you ! 

They can be yours, if you will only 
step up and ask for them. 

You can save the housewife from the 
ordeal of re-plastering. You can save 
her from the seeping, floating gritty 
dust that causes needless houseclean- 
ing drudgery. You can build a beautiful 
ceiling that will remain crackproof so 
long as the house stands. 









Amazing Upson Floafing Fasteners 
anchor panels securing from the back. 
Eliminafe visible face nailing. Pro- 
vide for normal structural movement. 



It Is Pleasant 
Inside Work 

You will enjoy applying Upson Ceil- 
ings. It's work you can do the year 
'roiuid — regardless of weather. Upson 
Kuver-Krak Panels are clean, Hght in 
weight, easy to handle, and easj'^ to 
apply. Nearly all limiber dealers carry 
them in stock. Mouldings, fvirring 
strips, Upson No. 2 Floating Fasteners 
and nails are all you need. Be s\ire to 
insist upon and get Upson Kuver-Krak 
Panels }4" thick. They are the only 
panels designed especially for re-cover- 
ing cracked ceilings. Every panel is 
plainly marked "Kuver-Krak." 

We Can Help You Get 
Upson Ceiling Jobs! 

Inquiries from our national advertis- 
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constantly. If you would like to become 
an Upson CeiHng expert, send the cou- 
pon below. We'll put you in touch with 
the Upson Dealer in your community. 
Send coupon now! 



TH E UPSON COMPANY «6 Upson Point, Loekport, New York 

I would like to become an Upson Ceiling Expert. Send me Application Instructions and name of my 
nearest Upson Dealer. 



NAME- 



STREET- 
CITY 



STATE 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



A Monthly Journal, Owned smd Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 

of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor 
Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana 



Established in 1881 
Vol. LSX — No. 6 



INDIANAPOLIS, JUNE, 1950 



One Dollar Per Year 
Ten Cents a Copy 



— Con tents — 



Investments In Human Resources •- - - 5 

There was a day ^hen all money spent by the government, whether for schools or 
prisons or insane asylums, was considered "non-productive" and most people thought 
the least a government spent for any reasons the better ofF the nation would be. How- 
ever, experience shows that wise government expenditures pay handsome dividends. 

So Imports Won't Hurt? 9 

Last month the two top labor advisors to ECA Administrator Hoffman maintained 
that Hoffman's plan for helping Europe by letting down the tariff bars to foreign goods 
would not hurt American industry or American ■workers. Here is the other side of the 
picture. 



Better Break For The Jobless 



13 

With joblessness on the increase, increasing attention is focusing on the existing un- 
employment insurance program ^rhich v/as v^ritten when conditions ^ere far different 
from these prevailing today. A bill for revamping the program has been introduced 
by Representative McCormack. In this article his bill is analyzed. 



The Way To Better Schools 



21 

With the school-age population growing by leaps and bounds and many of our pres- 
ent school buildings becoming obsolete and dangerous, the nation must undertake a 
tremendous school construction program. However, taxes being vrhat they are, raising 
the necessary funds will be difficult. California's experience with the cheap but efficient 
one story school constructed of wood may hold the answer. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 
Plane Gossip 
Editorials 
The Locker - 
Official 

In Memoriam 
Correspondence 
To The Ladies 
Craft Problems 



16 

24 
28 
30 
31 
33 
39 
42 



Index to Advertisers 



4S 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress. Aiig. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



CARPENTERS 

BUILDERS and APPRENTICES 




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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE 

TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



Chicago Technical College 

G-123 Tech Bldg., 2000 So. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago 16, HI. 

Mail me Free Blue Print Plans and Booklet: "How to Read Blue Prints' 
with information about how I can train at home. 

Name Age 



Address Occupation 

City Zone State 



li 



;■!■• 



^%^ DANDEE REELS 

FOR ALL BUILDING TRADES 




No. 41 Reel and Plumb Bob. Use this new tool 
for a plumb line, mason line or chalk line. Iti 
has a spring bracket attached for the plumb bob 
when it is not in use. Anti-backlash, easy to 
add chalk, Nickle plated steel case and chrome, 
plated bob contains 100 ft, of No. 18 yellow 
mason line. 



No. 44 Chalk Line Reel. 50 

ft. of line is always chalked 
when drawn from the reel. 
Made so that the line cannot 
snarl or tangle within the 
case. Chalk lasts a year of 
ordinary use; can easily be 
reordered and reloaded. 




No. 44 



Plumbers* and Tinners' 

Furnaces... Circa Torches 

Furna Torches... Razor 

Blade Scrapers 




CEDARBERG MANUFACTURING CO., 561 So. 4th St., Minneapolis IS, 

Enclosed find $ for the following shipped pospaid: 

n No. 41 Reel (100 Ft.) @ $2.50 □ No. 44 Reel (50 Ft.) @ $1.00 

n No 43 Keel (100 Ft.) Similar to No. 44 @ $1.25 

Red, White, Blue and Dark Blue Chalk in 2 oz. Containers @ 15c. Color: 

Print Name: 



I 

I 

I Print Address: 



Write in Margin If Necessary 



l^O'^ 



.^ HANG THAT DOOR 
THE PROFESSIONAL WAY! 



USERS PRAISE 
HIGHLY 




"Really a help for the 
'old hands' and almost 

Makes a clean-cut, deeply-etched profile on door. ■ 'must' for the new 

Remove chips. Repeat operation on jamb. Hane "oys. 

door I No adjustments. No fussing. Precision made. 

Drop-forged, heat-treated steel. Comes in 3", 3i' 

and 4" (Std) sizes. 



ONLY $1.75 ea. — $3.50 a pair 
(any two) — $5.25 complete Bet 
of three. If dealer can't supply, 
send only $1.00 with order and 
pay postman balance plus post- 
age C. O. D. In Canada, .25c 
higher per order. No C. O. D. 
State sizes wanted. 



S. H. Glover 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

"The greatest help in 

hanging doors I have 
ever seen." 

J. Allen Charles 

Mullins. S. C. 



Comes With Conceded by carpenters to be almost indispensable, 
Leatherette case j^g hundreds of testimonials in file show. 
("E-Z Mark" Trade Mark Reg.) 



E-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377 Dept. C, Los Angeles 16. Cal. 



E-Z MARK TOOLS, Box 8377, Dept. C. 
Los Angeles 16, Calif. 



V 

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Clip and mail handy order form belovr. 



Gentlemen: Please send the following "E-Z" Mark Butt Gauges as checked below: 

Check Size 

n one of any size $1.75 — 

n two of any size $3.50 — 

n complete set of three any size $5.25 — 

I enclose check or money order O 
Send C. O. D D 

Address: City 

State: 



-Zone- 



Investments In Human Resources 

Editor's Note: "Socialism" and "Welfare State" are words that the American people will hear 
oftener and oftener as election day approaches. Reactionaries maintain that social legislation is 
bankrupting the nation and sapping the vitzdity of the people, while the more left wing elements 
work for the day when the government will be all things to all people. Who is right? The answer 
is neither. There is a vast middle ground within which the nation can work out a sound and 
stable future. The following excerpts from a recent speech by Mr. Thurston outline the problem. 

JOHN L. THURSTON, Federal Security Agency 
* * 

NOT SO VERY long ago, it used to be generally accepted that public 
expenditures were "nonproductive." Farmers and manufacturers and 
laborers produced the food, clothing, and shelter for mankind. Pro- 
fessional people produced the services. These were said to be "productive." 
Money put into farms, factories, transportation and communication, office 
buildings and the like— that was "productive" investment. But money put into 
paying for teachers, judges, policemen, legislators, and prisons— that was 
another story. Public expenditures didn't "produce" anything, it was argued. 
Public expenditures were merely that much taken out of what the economy 
produced. Everybody was poorer by the measure of every dime that went 
into the public coffers. That was a fairly common assumption fifty years ago— 
and there may be a few alive today who hold that view. 

According to this philosophy, the 
"best" public expenditure was the ample of nonproductive Government 
smallest that could possibly be made, expenditure. 

Prisons were good enough if they pre- Now experience has long since 
vented the escape of criminals. Men- demonstrated the fallacy of the nega- 
t^l hospitals were to keep patients out tive notion of Government expenditure 
of harm's way, and from banning -to most of us, at least. In the field 
others-at the least possible money of industrial safety, for example, in- 
cost. School teachers should be paid dustry itself has learned the lesson so 
the minimum going-rate, with no frills well that it pretty generally tends to 
and folderol added: no foolishness keep well ahead of the minimum 
like manual training and domestic standards established by legislation, 
science and art and music and citi- Recently the National Association of 
zenship. Manufacturers asked about 2,000 

This negative philosophy even ex- P^ant operators what their saxings 
tended to industry. What was tlie were, due to the establishing of medi- 
point in putting safety guards on ma- cal and safety departments. Prac- 
chinery, merely to prevent accidents? tically all of them reported that these 
The point was to get goods produced projects were paymg off handsomely, 
in largest quantities with minimum Here are the average reductions they 
cost. To set safety standards by legis- reported: 

lation, and then to establish a corps of In occupational disease 62.8% 

Government inspectors to swarm In absenteeism 29.7% 

through the factories to enforce those In compensation costs ^^-^^^ 

laws, was held to be one more ex- In labor turn-over 27.3% 



THE CARPENTER 



As this lesson has become clearer 
with the passing of the years, resist- 
ance to wise Government expenditure 
in programs of industrial health and 
safety has disappeared. Instead, we 
find today that there is the closest 
working cooperation between Gov- 
ernment and the general public, in- 
cluding management and labor, in 
pushing programs of health and safety 
in industry. All have learned that it 
pays oflF . . . handsomely. 

Much the same thing is true in 
other areas. Enlightened people no 
longer think of prisons just as places 
to lock up criminals at minimum ex- 
pense. Though we still have a long 
way to go, we really believe that they 
should be what the newer name says 
—"institutions of correction." And our 
thinking today goes even beyond cor- 
rection—our current concern with 
"juvenile delinquency" puts the accent 
on prevention. Experience has proved 
that the supervised playground turns 
out better citizens than the alley gang. 

Education is one of the crowning 
examples of the passing of the nega- 
tive notion of public expenditure. A 
century ago, as the idea of universal 
free compulsory^ schooling was bat- 
tling to win its way, there were those 
who condemned the whole notion as 
socialistic and dangerous. "What!" 
they cried, "Would you tax one man 
to pay for the education of another 
man's child?" But a century of the 
common school in America has dem- 
onstrated its value so conclusively 
that no responsible voice attacks the 
basic idea that it is wise to put public 
moneys into public schools for all the 
children. It pays oflF, in better citi- 
zens, better producers, finer people. 
It pays off, too, in dollars and cents, 
as any comparison of the man-hour 
productive efficiency of an educated 
labor force with an uneducated labor 
force shows. 



These examples only begin to sug- 
gest the reason why most of us have 
cast aside the ancient error that Gov- 
ernment expenditures are parasitic 
and unnecessary. All I have said up 
to this point is that we are no longer 
confronted vdth the erroneous as- 
sumption that public expenditures are 
"unproductive." We now know that 
they are productive. 

I must also dissociate myself from 
a second error which occasionally ap- 
pears in private and public discus- 
sions. Once in a while one meets some 
starry-eyed persons who see the truth 
that public expenditures pay off, and 
who go on from there to indulge in 
wild and speculative schemes of dan- 
gerous proportions. They are like the 
housewife who listened to a fast-talk- 
ing salesman's claim that the gadget 
he was peddling would cut her house- 
work in half. "Oh!" she said, brightly, 
"then I'll take two of them and cut out 
all my housework!" Just because pub- 
lic investment in human resources 
pays off, it does not follow that a lim- 
itless multiplication of that expendi- 
ture will be desirable for the individ- 
ual, or will be in the national interest. 

We must disavow this extreme just 
as clearly as we deny the assumption 
that public expenditure for human 
welfare is unproductive. We shall do 
well to recognize that public invest- 
ment, like any other investment, must 
be wisely made and guided by the 
rules of reason. This is a hard-boiled, 
realistic approach to the problem of 
human welfare. It supports all the 
finer ideals of humanity— and it keeps 
its feet on the ground as it moves 
forward. 

With that perspective, let's turn to 
the question of what public invest- 
ments in human resources actually 
cost— and why pay for them. Do we 
put more into them than we get out 
of them? Do public investments rep- 



THE CARPENTER 



resent a total waste, or a partial 
waste, or a net gain? What is the 
balance sheet? 

In general, I think we can say that 
much depends on what sort of public 
investment we are talking about, and 
the degree of adequacy of that in- 
vestment in the light of the need it 
tries to meet. 

If a man's roof is leaking, it will pay 
him to invest in more pots and pans 
to put in the attic to catch the drip. 
That saves the plaster and paint in 
the floors below. Even the minimum 
sort of public expenditure in picking 
up the pieces of wreckage left by the 
processes of history has a monetary 
justification of a sort. Property val- 
ues are higher and people rest more 
securely when everyone feels that the 
police system is doing an adequate 
job in restraining crimes of violence. 
The general economy has greater 
stability and continuing purchasing 
power when there is adequate unem- 
ployment insurance and when social 
security for the aged maintains the 
purchasing power of the older seg- 
ment of the population. A sick man 



who gets well quickly is a better pro- 
ducer than one whose absenteeism is 
high because of recurrent illness. 

But any wise householder knows 
that it is better to fix the roof than to 
run around the attic with pots and 
pans every time a shower comes. 
Whether he will put on a slate roof or 
use shakes or shingles or asphalt-and- 
gravel will depend on a lot of factors 
of judgment and pocketbook. But he 
knows that a tight roof is better than 
a leaky one, that a tight roof pays off. 
From year to year he cannot point to 
exact financial returns on a good roof; 
but he can know that he has not had 
to plaster the back bedroom after 
every spring rain. 

So it is with these investments in 
human resources. Certainly we shall 
never see the time when there will be 
no leaks in the roof, when we shall 
never need to spend something to 
help the afflicted and the unfortunate. 
But we also know that the wisest ex- 
penditure is that which reduces to the 
minimum the number of pots and 
pans we have to keep in the attic of 
the Nation, a policy which keeps the 
roof as tight as possible. 



SAN RAFAEL LADIES BACK MANY SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all from Auxiliary No. 495 of San Rafael, Calif. 

We are two years old but have had many successful projects and socials. Among the 
latter, the Auxiliary assisted the Brothers of Local 35 in the dedication of their new 
Carpenters' Hall on Lindero Street in San Rafael on November 5, 1949. 

We have enjoyed socials with other Auxiliaries in our town, believing that it will 
stimulate interest of all members of union auxiliaries. Our Members have taken an active 
part in all civic projects and donate to all worthy causes and also sponsor a Blue Bird 
Group of the Camp Fire Girls. 

Among the projects for raising funds, we have had a white elephant auction, food and 
apron sale, card parties, raffles, greeting cards, a dinner and box social. 

We meet the first and third Wednesdays and have a social and refreshments following 
the meeting. 

Our membership is 56 at the present time. We started vdth 44 charter members and 
we feel the Auxiliary can look forward to a successful and prosperous future. 

The officers are Mrs. L. Biasotti, President; Mrs. J. Cornwell, Vice President; Mrs. C. 
Nelson, Recording Secretary; Mrs. T. Perkins, Financial Secretary and Treasurer; Mrs. D. 
Myers, Warden; Mrs. E. Caswell, Conductor; Mrs. E. Kennedy, Mrs. C. Haskin and Mrs. 
H. Leard, Trustees. 

We would appreciate correspondence from other Auxiliaries and assure you of an answer 
to your letters. 

Here's to continued growth and success to all Union Auxiliaries. 

Fraternally, Mrs. Harriet Nelson, Recording Secretary 



P^ail| ($a^ilsr "^anrb 0itmhtx 0invitl 



DEATH CLOSED a long and honorable labor career when Arthur 
Martel, General Executive Board member for the Seventh District, 
passed away in a Montreal hospital on May 16th. Born at St. Urbain, 
Charlevoix County, Quebec on August 1, 1871, Brother Martel devoted all 
of his adult life to the advancement of organized labor's cause not only in 
Canada but in the United States as well. His unflagging efforts in behalf of 

the working man and his practical, down- 
to-earth approach to all problems earned 
him thousands upon thousands of firm 
friends from coast to coast on both sides 
of the border. 

Brother Martel became a member of 
the United Brotherhood away back in 1902 
when he joined Local Union No. 1127 of 
Montreal as a charter member. For many 
years he served as president of that union. 
For some six years he served as president 
of the Montreal District Council. Largely 
through his efforts the Quebec Provincial 
Council was organized in the City of Sorel 
in 1906. For some twelve years he served 
the council as president. 

During the Sixteenth General Conven- 
tion in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1910 he was 
elevated to General Executive Board Mem- 
^ ber for the Seventh District, a position to 

which he was consistently re-elected ever since. In this capacity he assisted 
in the organization of the greater number of local unions now existing in tlie 
Seventh District. He also helped to organize many of the Building Trades 
Locals which are functioning today in Canada. 

Many signal honors have come to Brother Martel in his labor career. For 
six years he served as vice-president of the Trades and Labor Congress of 
Canada. In 1919 and 1920 he was elected delegate to the International Labor 
Conferences which were held in Washington, D. C, and Geneva, Switzerland. 
In April of last year. King George VI, recognizing Brother Martel's many 
contributions to the welfare of Canada, bestowed upon him the honorary title 
of Member of the British Empire. 

With the advice and guidance of Brother Martel, the workers of Montreal 
and the entire Province of Quebec have made rapid and consistent progress 
through their labor movement. When the Carpenters of Montreal dedicated 
their great new headquarters building on November 11, 1946, a long cherished 
dream of Brother Martel came true; which explains why it is often referred 
to as "Martel Building." 

The passing of Brother Martel left a gap that will be hard to fill. Funeral 
services were held at Saint Ambrose Parish Church, Friday morning. May 19th. 




So Imports Won't Hurt? 

* * * 

OUR TARIFFS used to be set and revised in accordance with the needs 
of our domestic economy. Now they are talked of as expendable or, 
to be more exact, the American industries that depend on tariffs are 
now being treated as expendable, in the effort to foster imports and so balance 
our foreign trade at current abnoi-mal export levels. Some of these industries 
are being marked for sacrifice and when they go, men lose jobs, investors 
lose money, suppliers lose customers and the country loses some of the 
elements in a diversified economy. 

Can we stand the loss of the Waltham Watch Company? The Waltham 
Co. recently closed its doors because of inability to compete with foreign 

goods flooding the market. Thousands 

lost their jobs as a result. We have 
only two old-line watch manufactur- 
ers left. Who bene- 
fits from liquidating 
Waltham? Switzer- 
land perhaps? That 
admirable, demo- 
cratic country is 
worth having as a 
friend, but is she 
making reciprocal 
sacrifices on the al- 
tar of friendship? 

Here is what Prof. 
Friederich A. Lutz 
of Princeton said about the Swiss at 
the last annual meeting of the Acad- 
emy of Political Science: "Switzerland 
has no shortage of dollars, and yet 
she adheres to a system of bilateral 
trade agreements, chiefly because she 
aims at preserving a certain structure 
of her exports by making the partner 
countries to these agreements import 
watches and other Swiss export goods 
and allow their citizens to travel in 
Switzerland. She has even gone so 
far as to make balances of Swiss 
francs accumulated by Argentina and 
the Bizone of Germany inconvertible 
into dollars, so as to force these coun- 



With Uncle Sam now proposing to 
boost imports of foreign goods through 
tariff reductions as a means of helping 
the European economy, the tariff ques- 
tion becomes an extremely important one. 
In last month's issue, the two top labor 
advisors to the Economic Cooperation 
Administration, in an article entitled 
"Imports Won't Hurt Us", endeavored to 
show that the EGA program for lower- 
ing the tariff bars to European goods 
will not hurt our economy. In the fol- 
lowing article, Richard H. Anthony, sec- 
retary of the American Tariff League, 
shows the other side of the picture in 
a condensation of an article which ap- 
peared in The Commercial and Finan- 
cial Chronicle. 



tries to use the balances for purchases 
or travel in Switzerland." 

Perhaps Switzer- 
land must resort to 
these measures to 
protect her econo- 
my and her demo- 
cratic processes. 
Whatever the an- 
swer, these Swiss 
measures are re- 
strictive and discrim- 
inatory, whereas our 
low-average tariffs 
are the mildest kind 
of trade regulation. 

Let's get down to fundamentals. 
We need certain raw materials and 
we like certain finished products that 
come from abroad. In order to induce 
the foreigner to send them to us we 
must send him what we have that he 
needs or wants. You can disguise and 
complicate the problem ad infinitum 
by the introduction of currency, ex- 
change, etc., but the basic fact is that 
our foreign trade starts with a de- 
ficiency on our part which must be 
paid for by transfer of a portion of 
our production. The latter day idea 
that the amount of goods we can or 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



want to ship abroad should be the 
measure of what we take in, even 
though some domestic producers go 
bankrupt in the process of balancing 
income and outgo, puts the cart half 
a mile ahead of the horse. 

The latest agency to urge that we 
should artificially foster our imports 
at the expense of certain of our do- 
mestic producers is the Economic Co- 
operation Administration. 

The EA had two jobs to do: (1) geo- 
graphical containment of Commun- 
ism, and (2) fostering economic re- 
covery of foreign nations. In Europe 
both goals have been accomplished. 
Communism has made no further en- 
croachment to the west: and the Euro- 
pean EC A countries, except Germany, 
have either surpassed or achieved 
approximately their pre-war produc- 
tion and export positions quantita- 
tively. 

Now ECA says, in effect: We are 
getting ready to pull out of Europe 
and when we go we want the in- 
coming and outgoing elements in the 
U. S. -European trade to balance, and 
furthermore to balance at the current 
U. S. export level. Translated into 
figures, ECA's suggestion means that 
Europe must expand its exports to 
the United States by $3.5 billion, an 
increase of 300% or more. Clearly, 
Europe is in no position to meet this 
extraordinary^ demand, no matter 
what inducements the United States 
may offer. Yet, ECA publishes a list 
of U. S. commodities on which there 
are individual tariffs of 25% or great- 
er and says, in effect: Slash those and 
help close the gap. 

We say it misleads the American 
public and lays the ground-work for 
international ill-will to offer any such 
illusory hope that further slashing of 
our tariffs, which, at an average of 
13%, are the lowest in our history, or 
even eliminating them entirely, will 
have any appreciable effect on closing 



the trade gap. Cutting tariffs in such 
an indiscriminate fashion can ruin in- 
dividual companies or even whole in- 
dustries in the United States, but it 
will not close the foreign trade gap at 
the current export level. 

The tariff has no measurable im- 
portance in the overall trade picture 
an\^way. Our imports rise and fall 
with our national income, despite the 
level of tariff at any particular time. 
Over the long years our imports have 
shown a general upward trend that 
echoes our increase in population. 

It so happens that the amount nec- 
essary to balance the current ERP 
dollar deficit is roughly the same as 
the value of the products of the entire 
pulp and paper industry in the United 
States for 1947, i.e., $.3 billion. I as- 
sume you would not be willing to sac- 
rifice your industry, employing 200,000 
wage earners, in order to bring in im- 
ported commodities sufificient in value 
to equal that figure. 

If you have any doubts about the 
misleading nature of the ECA recom- 
mendations, let me suggest that you 
read what the experts say and apply 
every statistical test of which you 
know. I have done both and the 
answer keeps staring me in the face- 
slashing tariffs is of no avail in tack- 
ling the trade gap problem. 

Here is what Professor Seymour E. 
Harris of Harvard told that same 
Academy of Political Science meeting: 
"Despite the large reduction in tariffs 
here and increased restriction abroad, 
which should have facilitated Eu- 
ropean exports and depressed their 
imports, despite the widespread use of 
controls abroad to raise exports and 
reduce imports, despite the much 
larger rise in money wages here— 
despite all of these, the United States 
has been flooded with gold and the 
world is short of dollars." 

Now, just a few figures to docu- 
ment the League's conclusions. The 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



data are for 1948, but preliminary 
1949 reports indicate no substantial 
change in the size of oui foreign trade 
gap. According to ECA's own figures, 
we imported from ERP countries in 
1948, $2.4 billion of goods and serv- 
ices, of which $1.2 billion consisted of 
merchandise. We exported to those 
countries $5.9 billion of goods and 
services, resulting in an export-over- 
import imbalance of $3.5 billion. That 
$3.5 billion is the gap. When people 
talk of cutting U. S. tariffs in order to 
bridge that gap they are suggesting 
that we expand $1.2 billion of mer- 
chandise imports from Europe to $4.7 
billions, a 300% increase. If they ex- 
pect services, such as tourist expendi- 
tures abroad, to increase also, they 
may have that merchandise figure, but 
still it is going to be close to 300%. 
Professor Harris says that should de- 
valuation reduce dollar prices of 
Western European products by a fifth, 
the required increase would be 400%. 
According to a year-end International 
Monetary Fund report, such dollar 
prices are nearing that margin of 
decline. 

I won't bore you further with fig- 
ures provided you will take on faith 
that to ask a 300-400% increase in pro- 
duction for export in Europe is a fan- 
tastic demand, particularly when 
EGA is asking Europe to integrate its 
economy and step up its internal trade 
as well. 

Actually there is surprisingly little 
dispute over the figures or the facts. 
Practically everyone who has studied 
the "trade gap" problem realizes that 
tinkering with the cmrrently low-aver- 
age U. S. tariff is not going to solve 
it, but what puzzles us in the League 
is why, with this general acceptance 
of the facts, there is the iUogical de- 
mand to go ahead and cut tariffs 
across the board anyway. We suspect 
that those who make this proposal are 
motivated not so much by a desire to 



close the trade gap as by a desire just 
to slash tariffs. 

The favorite argument for tariff-cut- 
ting as a desirable operation per se, is 
that it will foster the importation of 
goods from low-labor-cost foreign 
countries and thus save money for the 
American consumer. Let me give you 
the latest illustration of how wrong 
this argument can be. 

We have had a dwindling wool- 
raising industry in the U. S. for some 
years. Dm'ing the war it was essen- 
tial, ff not vital, because hauling wool 
from Australia through submarine-in- 
fested waters was uncertain and dan- 
gerous. Since the war the argument 
that the wool tariff was adding pen- 
nies to the price of \our winter suit 
came to the fore, and, despite the 
pleas of the American wool growers, 
the tariff on raw wool was cut at 
Geneva in 1947 for the benefit of 
Australia. Since then our western 
herds have dwindled still more and 
Australia has virtually cornered the 
market. Last month at the wool auc- 
tion in Sydney, private buyers from 
the United States and Great Britain 
found themselves bidding against 
state trading company representatives 
from a number of countries for the 
wool clip, with the result that the 
price of wool has gone soaring and 
you may have to pay a little more for 
your next suit as a result, and despite 
the lower tariff. 

While we are considering object 
lessons, I also would like to say that 
coffee, on which there is no "wicked" 
tariff whatsoever, is fast becoming a 
luxury in many households, indicating 
that free trade is not exactly a solution 
to the problem of the high cost-of- 
living. 

The tariff still has a part to play in 
our economy. It is, by universal ad- 
mission, the mildest, and fairest regu- 
latory measure in international trade 
and we need it to preserve competi- 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



tive conditions in our domestic mar- 
ket as betAveen foreign producers and 
certain of our industries with a high 
labor element in their total produc- 
tion costs. It is as unrealistic to de- 
mand the ehmination of tarifFs because 
most of those industries are not now 
being injured, as it is to demand the 
ehmination of the fire department 
because the cit\"'s fire record has im- 
proved. There is nothing in the pres- 
ent state of affairs that gives us a.ny 
confidence that the ciurent abnormal 
level of domestic demand and pro- 
duction will continue in its present 
pattern. Indeed the pattern is begin- 
ning to change, and as it tends toward 
the normal situation, injuries due to 
unwise tariff slashing will come for- 
cibly to pubhc attention. Ahead}' a 
number of danger flags are fluttering. 

Under a flexible tariff system we 
could var\- our rates to match chang- 
ing situations, but we have no flexible 
system at present. Om: tariffs are be- 
ing continuously cut b\- international 
agreement. Anv move toward subse- 



quent upward readjustment of a rate, 
however just, creates an international 
incident and so is avoided b\" our gov- 
ernment, although foreign govern- 
ments can take such unilateral actions 
with impunit\'. We have also seen 
that the philosoph\- of downward re- 
\^sion only of tariffs has so permeated 
our government departments and 
commissions that the trade agree- 
ments escape clause, which was sup- 
posed to safeguard our domestic 
producers from injurious dut}' cuts, 
has not once been invoked nor has 
any of the many showdngs of injury 
e\-en been followed by recommenda- 
tion that the clause be invoked. Some 
ha\-e not even been thoroughly in- 
vestigated. 

The tariff is important to certain 
domestic industries. It is not a tool 
with which you can tinker our inter- 
national trade account into balance. 
I urge you to let the tariff perform 
the function for which it is best fitted, 
and to tackle the trade gap problem 
with tools better adapted to the pur- 
pose. 



POTTSVELLE GR.\DUATES LARGE APPPiEXTICE CLASS 

On Tuesday evening, April 11th, at Reilly Hall, a well-attended meeting saw a fine 
group of young men receive their Joume^Tnen Certificates attesting to their completion of 
four years of apprenticeship study. V»'ith appropriate ceremonies the young men were 
welcomed into tlie union and into the carpentr>' craft. Virtually all of them are veterans 
of one or anotlier branches of tlie armed forces. 

Lower Left to Right: Stanley 
Galavage, under Schneider & 
DaWs; Joseph Hollick. under 
Diamond Home & Improve- 
ment Co.: Guy Ir\-ing, Pres. of 
Local 228; James Deibler, un- 
der Chester Cooper; Benjamin 
Rosenberger. under MaUck and 
Lewars. 

Middle Row. Left to Right: 
Daniel Basgil, under Schneider 
& Davis; George Schultz, un- 
der Kingston Contracting Co. 
& Arthm- A. Johnson Inc.; 
Homer Riegel. under Burton 
Cooper: Robert Sterner, under 
Schneider 6c Da%"is, missing. 

Top Row, Left to Right: Clark Lewars. Vice Pres.; John McCready. Recording Sec'y; 
G. Edward Ossman, Business Agent and Financial Sec'y; George W. Houser, Treasurer. 




13 



Break For The Jobless 



WITH unemployment climbing despite continued high business ac- 
tivity, increasing attention is focusing on the existing unemployment 
compensation program. Pressure for extension and improvement of 
the program is mounting. Since construction work tends to be seasonal and 
subject to economic fluctuations, construction workers have a vital stake in 
any revisions which might be made in the program. Recently Representative 
John W. McCormack introduced in the House a bill to revamp the unemploy- 
ment compensation program and bring it more nearly into accord with current 
conditions. Principle provisions of the bill (H. R. 8059) are herewith outlined: 

I— Extension of Coverage 

A. Coverage under the Federal Un- 
employment Tax Act of employers 

I who have one or more individuals in 
employment at any time, thus extend- 
ing the protection of the employment 
security program to employes of small 
firms. 

B. Coverage of Federal civilian em- 
ployes under the unemployment in- 
surance laws of the states where 
employes perform federal services, 
the costs to be financed by the federal 
government. 

C. Redefinition of agricultural labor 
to bring v/ithin coverage of the pro- 
gram certain employes who are not 
ordinarily thought of as performing 
"agricultural labor" and employes 
who perform certain operations of an 
essentially industrial nature on farm 
commodities for employers other than 
farmers. 

D. Redefinition of the term "em- 
ploye" to bring within the coverage of 
the program certain individuals who, 
although economically dependent 
upon the employer, fail to meet in 
some respects the technical common 
law definition of the term "employe." 
The bill also removes the exemption 
relating to insurance salesmen. 



E. Puerto Rico to be defined as a 
state under Title HI and the Federal 
Unemployment Tax Act, subject to 
Puerto Rico's acceptance of coverage. 

H— Minimum Benefit Provisions to Be 
Incorporated into State Laws 

A. Benefit payments to individuals 
without dependents to be substan- 
tially equal to 50 per cent of weekly 
wages up to at least $30 a week; for 
individuals with one dependent, ben- 
efits to be substantially equal to 60 
per cent of weekly wages up to at 
least $36 a week; for individuals with 
2 dependents, benefits to be substan- 
tially equal to 65 percent of weekly 
wages up to at least $39 a week; and 
for individuals with 3 or more de- 
pendents, benefits to be substantially 
equal to 70 per cent of weekly wages 
up to at least $42 a week. 

B. Benefit duration of at least 26 
weeks in a benefit year, uniformly 
available to all insured unemployed 
persons. 

C. Qualifying requirements of not 
more than (1) wages equal to 30 times 
the benefit amount; or (2) wages equal 
to IV2 times high-quarter earnings; or 
(3) 20 weeks of employment in the 
base period. These qualifying require- 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



ments are in common use in the 
states. 

Ill— Provisions to Assure Prompt and 

Full Payments of Benefits to 

Multistate Workers. 

In order to assure that persons who 
work in several states during their 
base period shall receive full and 
prompt payment of benefits to which 
they are entitled, the bill contains 
provisions directing the Secretary of 
Labor to withhold from a state ad- 
ministrative grants unless the state 
law contains pro\'isions for participa- 
tion in plans and methods of combin- 
ing wage credits of multistate workers 
and for handling interstate claims 
which the Secretary of Labor finds 
are reasonably calculated to assure 
the prompt and full payment of bene- 
fits to workers who move from one 
state to another. 

IV— Provisions Designed to Preclude 

Abuse of the Program by 

Fraudulent Claimants 

In order to prevent fraud and to 
eliminate all t\'pes of unwarranted 
payments, the bill contains pro\'isions 
directing the Secretary of Labor to 
withhold from a state administrative 
grants unless the state law contains 
provisions for methods of administra- 
tion which the Secretary of Labor 
finds are reasonably calculated to pre- 
vent misuse of the unemplo^Tnent in- 
surance program by fraudulent claim- 
ants and to assure the payment of 
compensation only to individuals en- 
titled thereto. 

V— Provisions Relating to Waiting 
Period and Disqualifications. 

Benefits are to be payable to all un- 
emplo\ed insured claimants who are 
able and willing to work except that a 
state may postpone the payment of 
benefits for the first week of unem- 
plo\"ment in a benefit year; it may 
postpone the payment of benefits (but 
not reduce the benefits potentially 



payable) up to 6 weeks if the claimant 
voluntarily quits work without good 
cause, or w^as discharged for miscon- 
duct connected with his work, or re- 
fused suitable work without good 
cause. 

A state may deny benefits to strik- 
ers, but not to employes who are 
"locked-out" by their employer. It 
may postpone, or reduce the amount 
potentially payable, or cancel the 
wage credits, of any individual who 
makes a false claim for benefits. A 
state may, if it so desires, postpone 
for the duration of his unemplo>TTient 
the payment of benefits to any indi- 
vidual who has been discharged for 
misconduct connected with his last 
employment which has resulted in his 
conviction of a crime. 

VI— Financing Provisions (Including 
Reinsurance Grants) 

A. Automatic appropriation of pro- 
ceeds of the Federal Unemployment 
Tax Act to the federal unemployment 
account in the Unemployment Trust 
Fund. The federal unemployment Ac- 
count is to be used (1) to provide 
grants to states to defray the costs of 
administering their unemployment 
compensation laws and their public 
employment oflBces; (2) to defray the 
costs of the federal administration of 
the employment security program; 
and (3) to provide reinsurance grants 
to states. 

The bill also authorizes contin- 
gency appropriations to be available 
to states for the administration of 
their employment securit}' programs 
in the event of unforeseen changes in 
conditions, such as an unexpected in- 
crease in the number of claims filed. 

B. Substitution of reinsurance 
grants for present provisions for loans 
to states which have expired. The bill 
pro\ides that a state shall be entitled 
to a reinsurance grant for any calen- 
dar quarter beginning after June 30, 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



1950. whenever on the last day of a 
calendar quarter the funds available 
to the state for the payment of unem- 
ployment compensation fall below the 
amount of compensation paid during 
the preceding 6 months. 

However, in order for a state to be 
eligible for reinsurance grants after 
the computation date for the first tax- 
able year beginning after December 
31, 1952, it must have levied a tax rate 
of at least 1.2 per cent on all covered 
employment if on the computation 
date for such taxable year the state's 
unemployment fund has fallen below 
a specified margin of safety; namely, 
below 6 per cent of the most recent 
annual taxable payroll or below the 
amount of compensation paid during 
the two years immediately preceding 
such date, whichever amount is 
greater. 

The amount of the grant is to be 
an amount estimated by the Secretary 
of Labor to be equal to three-fourths 
of the compensation which will be 
payable during the quarter for which 
such grant is made which exceeds 2 
per cent of the taxable payroll for 
such quarter. The bill contains ap- 
propriate safeguards against the pos- 
sibility of a state unduly liberalizing 
its unemployment insurance law with 
the expectation of defraying the in- 
creased cost occasioned thereby with 
funds obtained from a reinsurance 
grant. 



VII— Definition of Wages. 

A. The upper limit on earnings sub- 
ject to the Federal Unemployment 
Tax Act during a calendar year is in- 
creased from $3,000 to $4,800. The 
taxable wages limitation is made ap- 
plicable, under certain conditions, to 
wages paid either by the employer or 
by a predecessor employer. 

B. The term "wages" is defined to 
include tips, but only in the amount 
that the employe reports in writing, 
within a specified time, to the em- 
ployer as having been received by 
him during the calendar quarter. 

VIII-EflFective Dates. 

A. The provisions relating to bene- 
fits would become effective July 1, 
1952. '■ 

B. The provisions relating to exten- 
sion of coverage (except for federal 
employes) and definition of wages 
w^ould become effective January 1, 
1952. 

C. Federal employes would become 
entitled to benefits beginning January 
1, 1951. 

D. The automatic appropriation of 
the proceeds of the Federal Unem- 
ployment Tax Act to the federal un- 
employment account would become 
effective January 1, 1951. 

E. States would become ehgible for 
reinsurance grants with the quarter 
beginnmg July 1, 1950. 



CANADA'S FINANCES COMPARED WITH OURS 

Canada's budget and finances are analyzed in a study recently prepared by tlie staff 
of the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation. Comparisons with the Umted 
States are made in certain salient respects. 

One of the marked diflFerences between the two countries is that Canada is operating 
at a budget surplus though its expenditures are currently higher tlian in the 1949 fiscal 
year. On a per capita basis, Canada's expenditures, tax receipts and the pubhc debt 
burden are very much lower than in the United States. The Canadian funded debt 
currently is the equivalent of $1,109 per capita as compared witli nearly $1,700 per 
capita in the United States. 

Sales and excise taxes represent the biggest single source of Canadian Government 
receipts in the 1951 budget, rather than individual income taxes as is the case m the 
United States. 



-5 IP 



SLIGHTLY CONFUSING 

Is there danger of a shooting war with 
Russia in the foreseeable future? It seems 
as if your guess is as good as anybody's. In 
the past few weeks various high Brass in 
Washington have predicted: 1. there will be 
no war for ten years; 2. the war is prac- 
tically on right now; 3. there may never be 
a war. Apparently all you have to do is 
make your own guess and in a day or two 
you will have some Brass Hat backing you 
up. To our way of thinking, the whole con- 
fused situation is reminiscent of the depart- 
ment store floor walker. 

Anxious to buck up business, the proprie- 
tor of a large store engaged an "efficiency 
expert" whose chief delight was changing 
the departments around. 

One day a section would be at the top 
of the building; the next it would be in the 
basement or else where the restaurant used 
to be. 

After three weeks of this, an old lady 
approached a worried-looking floor-walker 
one morning and asked if he could tell her 
where the kitchen utensils were. 

"No, madam," repUed, wearily; 'Taut if 
you stand here for a few minutes, I'm sure 
you'll see them go by." 




"If you were Union, Pop, you 
wouldn't have to supplement your 
wages this way!** 



WHAT'S SAUCE FOR THE GOOSE 

Last month the United States Supreme 
Court upheld the constitutionality- of Section 
9 (H) of the Taft-Hartley Law which re- 
quires all union officers to sign a non-com- 
munist affida\"it before the union is entitled 
to use of the ser\'ices of the National Labor 
Relations Board. \\Tiile we have nothing 
but the highest respect for the integrity and 
ability of the Supreme Court, it seems odd 
that communists can sit in Congress, they 
can engage in business, or they can enter 
the professions (and sometimes probably 
do) because nobody checks on these areas 
of otir economic Life. But let some poor old 
wood butcher or pile driver get elected 
warden of his local union and immediately 
he has to satisfy Uncle Sam that he is not a 
Red. If non-communist affida\its are okay 
for union officials, why not for Congressmen 
and employers and professional men too? 
What's sauce for the goose certainly ought 
to be sauce for the gander. The same for 
each customer ought to be the rule— which 
brings to mind an old one. 

An Eastern planned to move to the West 
for his health and, before deciding on a spe- 
cific location, visited several communities to 
check on conditions. In one small town he 
encountered an old-timer sitting on the steps 
of the general store and, during a short 
chat, he asked: 

"What is the death rate here?" 

To which the oldtimer replied: "Same as 
anv place, bub. One to a person." 
• • • 
TL\IE TO LEA\'E THE AX 

Despite the billions of dollars that have 
been poured into European rehabilitation 
since the end of the war, few of the coim- 
tries are as yet able to stand on their own 
feet. Current European appropriations under 
consideration still run into bilhons and al- 
ready there is plenty of talk that the aid pro- 
gram will have to be carried beyond 1952, 
the original goal set for discontinuing all aid. 

A wood butcher can hardly be expected 
to know very much about international fi- 
nance. However, from where we sit, it 
seems to us that the time has come for a 
iittle reviewing of our whole program. 
Maybe the time has come for Uncle Sam to 
remember the old storv about Zeke, the hill- 
biUv. 



THE CARPENTER 



17 



Zeke got a job in the city. As he was 
taking leave of his family, his wife came to 
the door and called after him: 

"Come back here, Zeke," she bellowed. 
"You haven't split a stick of wood and the 
Lord knows how long you will be gone." 

Zeke turned around, and spitting out a 
generous gob of tobacco juice, he yelled 
I back: 
' "Hush your mouth, woman. The way 

■ you talk a body would think I was taking 
' the ax with me." 

* * • 

THE ONLY QUESTION 

Witli election day drawing closer. Senator 
'Taft's advisers are trying to picture him as 

■ a true liberal. However the Ohio Senator 
is tied too closely to a thoroughly reaction- 

• ary record for the <;ampaign to achieve much 
success. To oiu: way of thinking, he is in a 
position about like the young lady who went 
to a fortune teller; 

' "Very shortly," droned the mystic, "you 
'will meet a tall handsome man, who will 
' sweep you off your feet. He will shower you 

■ with gifts, take you to breath-taking night 
spots and the two of you will drink a toast 
to yo\ir everlasting love." 

"Has he lots of money?" she asked. 

"He is president of a large concern and 
heir to a million dollars." 

"Gosh," she stammered. "Now tell me 
ftist one more thing. How do I get rid of 

my husband and the two children?" 

I - 

• • • 

SORT OF SLOW 

The current session of Congress was going 
to rewrite the Social Security law to bring 
benefits more into hne with today's inflated 

(Conditions. To date, however, talk has been 
about the only thing that has emerged from 
Congress. If ovu" legislators intend to do 
an>i:hing about the unrealistic Social Se- 

iCurity benefits that exist today, they cer- 

.tainly are slow about getting around to it. 
Ip fact they sort of remind us of the farmer 
who crossed verbal swords with the truck 

.•driver. 

i The long distance van driver was grow- 
ing a little road- weary, so he pulled the unit 
safely oflE onto the shoulder of a pleasant 
stretch of Veiniont country road. Lighting 
up a fag, he gazed aromid about him and 
saw a farmer over in a field removing rocks. 

Thinking to have a little fun, he stepped 
rrom his cab, walked over to the fence and 



said: "Nice crop of rocks you raised here, 
Hiram. Where did they come from?" 

"Glacier brought 'em," grunted the farmer 
without even turning. 

"Oh, the glacier, eh?" the van driver 
teased. "Where's the glacier, now?" 

"Well, if you're really interested, sonny," 
snapped tlie farmer, "I'll tell you. It's gone 
back after more rocks." 

* * • 

PAUP ON ECONOMICS 

Prices have started spiraling upward 
again, but Joe Paup, the George Bernard 
Shaw of the Skidroad, is not worried. 

"It's easy to get along on a modest in- 
come," says Joe, "so long as you don't spend 
too much trying to keep it a secret from the 
neighbors." 

• • * 

COULD BE 

A recent survey indicates that the nation— 
particularly in the riural areas— is alarmingly 
short of qualified doctors. Strenuous work- 
ing conditions, vast amount of training re- 
quired, and exceptionally heavy cost of ac- 
quiring a medical degree are given as rea- 
sons for the existing scarcity of doctors. 

Maybe tliere is anotlier reason; maybe 
some of them get more money for endorsing 
cigarettes than they could make practicing 
medicine. 




*My boss presented it to me as a 
ward for i^ joinwig the ■nieiL'' 



18 



360 Per Cent In 15 Years 



Nr ORTHWESTERN Council Lumber and Sawmill \\'orkers, speaking 
for the vast bulk of the Douglas Fir belt emplo\-es. late last month 
— announced it has reached a proposed settlement with a large part of 

the Douglas Fir area for an across the board wage increase of 10/2 cents an 
hour, retroactive to May 1, 1950, according to Kenneth Da\ds, Executive 
Secretary. 

The proposed settlement establishes a minimum of 81.55)2 within the 
industry, up from S1.45, the previous scale. All wages will be increased 
accordingly. Executive Committee of the Council is recommending to all 
Local Unions and District Councils 



that if any emplo>er in the North- 
west lumber industr}- refuses to grant 
the lOM cents increase retroactive to 
May 1, "With absoluteh' no strings 
attached," that strike action be taken. 

The recommended agreement 
covers approximately 22,000 workers 
in the Douglas Fir belt. 

The Brotherhood Lumber Worker 
negotiators rejected all offers of wage 
increases which would be deducted 
by the employer to be turned over 
to insurance companies for welfare 
benefits, it was announced. This was 
done, it was explained, because such 
deductions would increase income tax 
and other withholdings, an increase 
which the emplo\'es would never re- 
ceive, causing an actual wage reduc- 
tion and "because it would place the 
entire obligation of establishing a wel- 
fare program on the union and em- 
ployes only." 

The Northwestern Council an- 
nouncement said that Brotherhood 
and Sawmill Workers also rejected 
all other settlements oflFered in lieu 
of wage increases because there were 



strings attached that would make the 
value of such offers, including paid 
holidays, more favorable to emploj-ers 
than to the workers. 

"The Council did not agree to with- 
hold any further demands for pen- 
sions for any period of time, and in- 
tends to make further studies along 
this line," according to Kenneth Davis, 
Executive Secretary. "We still believe 
a pension in which the emplo\"er is 
obligated is a definite benefit to th| 
industry." 

"This establishes 81.55)2 per hoi 
as the minimum in Western WasW, 
ington and Oregon or 812.44 -pei day.| 
The average for industr}^ now is Sll 
per hour or 814.80 per day. Not bad! 
when )ou consider it was 8 .42M mini-^ 
mum in large operations and less m\ 
others when we joined the Brother- 
hood in 1935, an increase in 15 years! 
of $1.13 per hour, plus paid vacation,! 
overtime, improved conditions, restj 
periods, seniority, safet}' programs,' 
and job security— all this in spite ofl 
a dual movement within our industr}''! 
called the C.I.O. which is still largely! 
controlled by fellow travelers here in| 
the Northwest." 



19 



■-Because-- 

The following piece was written by Richard S. Kaplan, historian and 
service officer of Gary (Indiana) Memorial Post 17, American Legion. It ap- 
peared in the March issue of "Hoosier Legionnaire." No one can read it 
without realizing what a privilege it is to be an American. 

* * * 

DAY BY DAY, my heart has been growing heavier and heavier, and 
inside of me I've been getting sicker and sicker. Reading the audaci- 
ous boasts and pledges of the leaders of the Communist Party in the 
United States, most of whom are now on trial before Judge Medina, that in 
the event of a war between the United States and Russia, they will support 
and aid Russia, simply nauseates me. 

How in the name of heaven can one 
possessing the brain of an ant live in 
these United States and support the 
ideologies of communistic Russia? As 
a democracy, why should we continue 
to harbor, protect and tolerate these 
disloyal creatures? 

Why do I feel so bitter about these 
men and all their ilk? Because I love 
America . . . love these United States 
with all my heart and with all my 
soul. Why do I love my country as 
I do? 

BECAUSE ... My father (God rest 
his soul) came here from Russia as a 
young man, fleeing from persecution 
and Czarism. He had nothing but his 
hands, his mind, and a will to learn 
and work. He found both here. 

Attending night school (at no cost 
to him) he learned the English lan- 
guage and the history of this country. 
He was given the chance to earn his 
living without let or hindrance, the 
whole world before him, handicapped 
by nothing and no one other than his 
own will and ability. 

BECAUSE . . . Given the chance, 
my father was able to own his own 
little business, practice his religion in 



his own temple, and raise four chil- 
dren to manhood and womanhood. 

BECAUSE . . . Those four children 
were given a free education, a chance 
to obtain college educations, a chance 
to travel and know this country. 

BECAUSE ... All through our 
lives we went to bed at night safe and 
secure in the knowledge that police 
were in the streets, not to knock at 
our doors, not to search our homes or 
to grab any of us and throw us, willy- 
nilly, into a dungeon-BUT TO PRO- 
TECT US AGAINST EVILDOERS. 
Asleep or awake, each of us KNEW 
that the power of our town, our 
county, state and nation was behind 
us, watching over us, protecting us 
like a loving mother ready to spring 
at the throat of any who would harm 
us and to avenge an injury to us 
through its police and courts. 

BECAUSE ... In spite of my re- 
ligion (or because of it), I was able to 
achieve an honored profession and, 
like my parents, bring my daughter 
and grandchild into this world blessed 
and protected by this same country. 

BECAUSE . . . When my father-an 
orthodox Jew-died in AUsten, Mass., 
he was carried to his grave by ten 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



pallbearers . . . police ofiBcer friends 
of his in life . . . ALL RO^L\X 
CATHOLICS, come to say their last 
farewells to their friend, 

BECAL'SE ... I was gi\-en an op- 
portunit}" to ser\'e ni}' country in time 
of peace and in the .Irrned Forces in 
time of war. not because I was forced 
to do so. but because I wanted to 
do so, 

BECAL'SE . . . Xone of the events 
and conditions abo^'e presented could 
have occurred in Communist Russia. 
where the indi\'idual is but a grain of 
sand to be blown hither and \"on by 
the faintest breath of the Politburo 
and its stooges, where the STATE is 
God and all, and where the individual 
is but a ser\-ant of the STATE. Be- 
cause . . . commmiism is the drug that 
destro}'s the ver>' soul of men, dwarfs 
the mind of man, and leaves him a 
pliable tool. 

BECAL'SE . . . Having; knowm 
FREEDOM ah my life, I tr'easure it 
. . . and FREEDOM is an unkno\^Ti 
thing in communistic Russia, or an\' 
countr}" dominated by communism. 
An\"thing ... or anyone who would 
take away my freedom . . . freedom 
of thought . . . freedom of worship 
. . . freedom of expression . . . free- 
dom to Ih'e m}' life as I \\'ish to li\"e 
it so long as I do not hiui: my feUow- 
man , . , I repeat . . . anything; that 
would destrov that freedom. I HATE 
\ATTH ALL THE HATRED IX MY 
HEART. 

BECAL'SE . . . Communism, evil 
thing that it is, wilL if allowed to 



spread and grow in this countn', de- 
stro}' the breath of life as we .Ameri- 
cans know it. And though the stooge 
leaders of communism in this coun- 
tr\- don't realize it, they. too. will be 
destroyed, for they will outli\"e their 
usefulness to the communistic state. 
and communism has alwa>"s preached 
that that which is not useful to the 
State MUST be destroyed. 

If m\" father were alive today he 
would sa\', as he said 100 times over 
in his life' "THERE IS XO GREATER 

or better couxtry ix all 
the world th.\x the uxited 
states, i kxow; you who 
\at:re borx hepuE doxt .ap- 
preciate A GOOD COUXTRY. 
LVE SEEX THE SLEET AXD THE 
STORM .\XD THE KlIX. I C.\X 
-\PPRECIATE THE SUXSHIXE . . . 
REPRESEXTED BY THE UXITED 
STATES.'-' 

Let us all sa}' arnen to his words. 

To those who prate of their love 
for communism, all I can say is, '1 
pit)' }"0u, Ma\' I. however, suggest 
that we in the United States can 
spare your presence here. Go . . . 
join the countr." }'ou lo\'e so much 
, . . practice \'our communistic ide- 
ology there. ^"\'e want no part of it 
here. 

I lo^"e rm" 

I HATE 
MUXISM . 
BROUGHT 



countr}", 

. . AXD FEAR COM- 
. , BECAUSE IT HAS 
FEAR WHERE OXLY 



LOVE EXISTED BEFORE, 



QUESTION OF PATRIOTISM 

The "\^'all Street Journal" is not likeh' to question the patriotism of Big Biisiness, but it 
reports this strange situation: 

An increasing number of large British companies are lea\'ing England and incorporating 
in Argentina, South Africa, and other countries. By doing this the companies avoid pa>ing 
British taxes on their profits. 

Strange still, the "Journal" says "American banking houses are insisting" that a big 
mining company move its oflSce from London to .Africa, to avoid taxes. Otherwise, the 
American bankers will refuse to bu>- shares in the company. 

Through the Marshall plan and otherwise. Uncle Sam is pro%iding dollars to help 
England get back on her feet. Is it patriotic for ".American banking houses" to '"insist" on 
something that makes British recover.- more difficult? 



21 



The Way To Better Schools 

* * * 

ACCORDING to a recent survey, the United States needs at least ten 
billion dollars worth of elementary and high school construction dur- 
ing the next few years to take care of the growing crop of youngsters. 
This would merely put our school system in shape to take care of our bumper 
crop of youngsters in something like adequate standards. In addition thou- 
sands upon thousands of youngsters attend school in buildings which are 
obsolete, unsanitary and downright dangerous. Added together, this means 
that hundreds of new schools must be built annually during the next decade. 
Our elementary and high school students now number something like twenty- 
five million. By 1960 that figure is expected to climb to better than thirty- 
four million. 

The job of getting our youngsters housed in decent schoolrooms is going 
to be no easy one. There is hardly a community existing in the United States 
today which is not already heavily burdened with a tax load of sizeable 
proporations owing to the inflationary spiral of the last decade. With Federal 
taxes constituting an increasingly heavy drain on the earnings of all individ- 
uals additional school revenues are not easy to raise. 

In the broadest sense the quality of education obtainable in our school 
buildings is related only remotely, if at all, to the cost of the buildings. But 
the cost of the buildings must be related to tlie ability of the taxpayer to 
pay for them. . 

The first necessity in planning a school building is to accommodate the 
expected school population, the second is to stay within a budget which will 
not impose an unbearable burden on the taxpayer. 

On the average, about 80% of the cost of a school "plant" goes into 
foundations and superstructure of the buildings, as distinguished from 
grounds, lighting and heating, landscaping and other facilities. 

Building costs consequently require a large portion of the tax dollar, and 
therefore, methods of holding down building costs are of major concern. 
Two important means of minimizing building costs are: (1) use of the most 
modern methods of design and construction, (2) use of the most economical 
materials of construction. 

The period following World War I will likely be marked in the field 
of architectLue as the age of monumental schools and tall apartment build- 
ings. Similarly the postwar period we are now in may well be designated 
as the down-to-earth period of one story schools and suburban single family 
dwellings. 

Architects, school boards and taxpayers throughout the country are 
tending rapidly toward the one story school because: 

1. Direct exits from each classroom provide for maximum safety. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



2. With smaller schools, the smaller ground sites are easier to ob- 
tain 

3. Better class and community facilities are provided. 

4. Mobile type of structures may be provided with ease of addi- 
tion and subtraction as needs grow and decline. 

5. Sound, versatile wood frame construction provides economical 
costs. 

California has long recognized the advantages of the one story school 
building constructed of wood. The state is noted for its progressive and up- 
to-date school system. Fine, modem, low-cost school buildings dot the state 
from border to border. By utilizing the great advantages which have been 
made in timber engineering, these schools have been built at a minimum 
cost to the taxpayers. School construction costs have been cut almost a 
third in some instances through the use of modem wood construction. 

If the last ten years taught us anything, it is that school plants ought 
to be as flexible as possible. Not only does the national birth rate fluctuate 
widely decade by decade, but population shifts also greatly affect tlie school 
load in any given area from year to year. A school plant capable of ser\ang 
the needs of the community in which it is located ought to be flexible. On 
this score, nothing can take the place of wood construction. This is another 
reason why so many of California's newest schools are constructed of wood. 

Laminated arches, ring binders, and other advances in timber engin- 
eering have made possible the construction of large, unsupported areas which 
gymnasiums and assembly halls require. Technology has also greatly in- 
creased the safety factors in wood construction, so that practically any and 
all of the questionable features of wood construction have long since been 
eliminated. Whether safety, beauty, or flexibility is the yardstick, wood con- 
struction can more than hold its own. In the area of construction costs, it 
stands alone, as the following table indicates: 

, TABLE I\'-Building \'aIuations* 









Cost per 


Occupancy Group 




Type of Construction 


Sq. Ft. 
July 1949 


Groups A, B and C— Public Assembly 


Type 


I— Concrete or Steel 


$13.90 


including schools. 


Type 


H— Wood and Masonry 


8.20 




Type 


I— Concrete or Steel 


15.30 


Group D— Hospitals, Jails, etc. 


Type 


V— Wood Frame 


6.45 


Groups E, F, G— Retail stores, public 


Type 


I— Concrete & Steel 


6.40 


garages, warehouses, industrial 


Type 


HI- Wood & iMasonr^' 


4.50 


buildings, office buildings. 


Type 


W— Steel frame— unplastered 


3.95 




Type 


IV— Steel frame— plastered 


4.30 




Type 


V— Wood Frame 


3.25 


Group H— Hotels & Apartment Houses 


Type 


I— Concrete or Steel 


11.75 




Type 


IH— Wood & Masonry 


7.60 




T^'pe 


V— Wood Frame 


5.45 


Group I— Dwellings. 


Type 


IH-Concrete Block 


7.35 




Type 


V— Wood Frame Siding 


6.50 




Type 


V— Stucco 


6.90 




Type 


V-Brick 


9.30 



^Territorial modifications vary from plus 14% in the Eastern Indiistrial Area to 0% for 
Southern California and minus 6% for the Southern States. Data was obtained from 
Marshall and Stephens, valuation engineers. 



THE CARPENTER 23 

Come what may, children in every area of the United States must be given 
an opportunity to get a decent education in a safe and comfortable school 
building. Needed dollars to provide such school houses will not be easy to 
raise. But the economies inherent in modern, one-story school construction 
may point to the answer. Every community considering the construction of a 
new school building ought to look carefully into the money-saving possibilities 
of wood construction. 



KODIAK HONORS RETIRING OFFICER 

At tlie March 17tla meeting of Local Union No. 2162, Kodiak, Alaska, the body pre- 
sented its retiring financial secretary. Brother Charles Skinner, with a suitably engraved 
gold watch as a slight token of the great esteem in which he is held by all members. Brotlier 
Skinner filled the office of financial secretary for twelve consecutive years in a manner that 
evoked nothing but the highest praise from all who had dealings with him. Mixing kind- 
ness and consideration with efficiency, he kept things moving smoothly without resorting 
to harsh words, tlireats or bulldozing. 

The great influx of construction workers dming the war made his Job a particularly 
arduous one during much of his term in office. But Brother Skinner never allowed the great 
rush of work to get him down or to keep him from giving a courteous answer to a decent 
question. In addition to his work-schedule as financial secretary of Local No. 2162, Brother 
Skinner also found time to capably fill the office of vice-president of the Alaska Federation of 
Labor. The union is proud of the fine record he made in the latter capacity. 

The resignation of Brother Skinner was accepted with great regret and the good wishes 
of his union brothers go with him wherever he may go and whatever new pursuits he may 
take up. 



LOCAL No. 1312 HONORS OLD TIMERS 

Local Union No. 1312, New Orleans, is justly proud of its fine roster of old time mem- 
bers. Recently the union sponsored a party and dance to pay tribute to its long time mem- 
bers who contributed so much to the advancements which have been made in wages and 
working conditions Particulary honored was Brother John L. Hubert a pensioned member 
now eighty years old. Brother Hubert has been a member in good standing continuously 
since 1903. Through the years he has been a staunch and unselfish member, always batt- 
ling for the betterment of the lot of his fellow workers. 

Away back at the turn of the century. Brother Hubert was being paid the munificent 
svim of $1.75 per week for running a shaper ten hours a day, seven days a week. When 
he asked for a slight increase in pay he was fired. This caused him to do some serious 
tliinking, and the conclusion he came to was that the employer could not fire his whole 
crew if they all asked for an increase at the same time. He began preaching this gospel 
to his fellow workers and presently enough of them were convinced that a charter in tlie 
United Brotherhood could be applied for. Thus old Local Union No. 732 was bom. 

After a time and against the advice of Brother Hubert the union went on strike. Times 
being exceedingly hard, the strike failed and the union fell by the wayside. Brodier Hubert 
transferred to Local Union No. 76. But this union too went out of existence. Shortly after, 
Brother Hubert became a charter member of Millmen's Local Union No. 1312. 

Following World War I, hard times again plagued the area. Like many otlier unions, 
Local 1312 found the going hard. But Brother Hubert never stopped fighting for die 
preservation of his union. He made many personal sacrifices to keep tlie union in existence. 
At one time he even donated a chest of tools to be raffled off to help less fortunate brothers. 
It was nip and tuck for some time, but the union weadiered the storm because men hke 
Brodier Hubert were backing it with everything they had. The decent wages and working 
conditions of today were made possible by the sacrifices of old timers such as Brodier 
Hubert. 

Over eighty years old today. Brother Hubert is still actively interested in the welfare 
o£ his union. 



Editorial 




Conditions on Overseas Construction 

Reliable reports indicate that there are at present from 180,000 to 185,000 
building tradesmen now employed by private contractors on overseas jobs. 
Much of this work is being done with Federal funds, yet the situation in which 
these men find themselves is comparable to that which existed a century or 
more ago, before workers had organized and gained the right to protect their 
working conditions through concerted action. 

Analysis of a contract entered into between the contractor on a Navy job 
in Africa and the men he hired to do the work indicates what these overseas 
workers are up against. The contract stipulates that the employe may not 
legally terminate the contract for 12 months, for any reason. He literally con- 
tracts himself into servitude for 12 month. He can, however, be discharged 
at any time, either with or without cause. If he does quit before he has 
worked for a year, he loses all his rights under the contract. After one year 
the employe may give notice to the employer, in writing, that he wants to 
end his employment. 

Not only is there not included in the contract a limitation upon the hours 
of work, but one provision of the contract which the employe is required to 
sign says that "The employe agrees to work whatever hours are required for 
the performance of his work and position, it being understood that no over- 
time will be paid under any circumstances." Cases have been reported in 
which building tradesmen have been forced to work as long as 84 hours a 
week, without overtime payment. 

In-order to enforce the provisions of the contract, the employer is entitled 
to withhold from each man's pay an amount equal to one-quarter of the man's 
gross weekly pay, until the sum of $400 has been withheld. If the employe is 
either discharged or quits, the contractor deducts from this sum the cost of 
transportation, food, and other expenses necessary to ship the man back to an 
agreed-upon place, usually the place of hire. In addition, the contractor may 
withhold payment of all wages or salary due the man who quits or is dis- 
charged until he has reached the point of return. At that time the man is 
supposed to be paid anything left over in the fund held by the contractor. 

The employe must also agree, in the contract, not to sue the employer for 
any reason. This leaves the employer free to do as he pleases and if he 
chooses he may charge the employe with having breached the contract and 
thus relieve himself of the responsibility of paying transportation and other 
costs in retLirning the worker to the place of hire. A contract of this kind 
invites such abuses, since it take away from the worker any right of redress. 
Men who fall sick have been forced to pay their own way home; men who 
complained about the insanitary living conditions provided for them, or the 
bad food supplied, have been discharged and forced to get home at their own 
expense. Other men, when the job was nearing completion, were discharged 



THE CARPENTER 25 

by the contractor upon one excuse or another, and the contractor was thus 

relie\'ed of the necessity of paymg return transportation. 

Many of the contractors who do work outside the continental United 
States employ only union building tradesmen in their work in the United 
States. When they do foreign work, howe\'er, they employ their labor through 
private employment agencies and it is customary for the men hired to pay 
such private agencies 5 per cent of their annual wage for referral to jobs. 

These thousands of men who are willing to go outside the country for work 
on necessary construction projects are in need of protection from their unions. 
The difficulty is to find a means by which such protection can be given. 
Ob\iously it is not possible for a union to investigate individual complaints of 
its members who may be at work on such projects. It does seem possible, 
however, to improve the hiring practices for such work and to secure a more 
equitable contract. The situation is most certainly one which requires our 
careful thought and study.— B.T.D. 



"Statisticalitis" is a Dangerous Disease 

In the last t\vo issues, we have published pro and con arguments regard- 
ing EGA Administration Hoffman's proposal to lower the tariff bars on 
foreign-made goods as a means of helping to rehabilitate Europe. These 
articles were written by supposed experts in the field. In their o\\ti wa>', each 
of them made a good case. It may be presumptions of a wood butcher to 
voice an opinion on the matter but so much is at stake that not to comment 
would constitute an evasion of a responsibility. 

Hoffman claims that a sizeable increase in imports would not harm 
American industry. On the other hand, he seems to lack conviction in his 
own arguments because he winds up by saying that men thrown out of work 
by imported goods could be retained in other lines of work much as was 
done during the war. Frankly, we think Hoffman is way off base. Imports 
do not have to be substantial to hurt. To simplffy the problem, if there are 
a hundred pair of shoes and a hundred buyers, everyone stays reasonably 
happy. But let somebody else come up with another pair, and what happens? 
The buyers start working the sellers against one another until the weakest 
seller is eliminated. We all saw the reverse work out dru-ing the war. Then 
there were more buyers than sellers. If there were a hundred car buyers in a 
town and only ninety-nine cars for sale, the buyers bid against each other 
and the fellow with the least money ended up without a car. In view of this 
simple fact Hoffman's argument that a slight increase in imports wiU not 
hurt the economy hardly seems valid. It takes only a slight shortage or 
surplus to create havoc in an industry. In fact, he must realize as much 
othervvise he would not be suggesting new training for victims of his scheme. 

Hoffman is undoubtedly a brilliant man; other\\dse he would not be 
able to hold down the many important jobs that come his way. However, 
like many important men in both government and industry, he possibly 
suffers from what we call "statisticalitis". This is a disease peculiar to indi- 
\dduals with great authority over the fortunes and welfare of large numbers 
of human beings. Its chief symptom is a tendancy to reduce everthing to 
statistics. To victims of statisticalitis, unemployment does not mean hungry 



26 THECARPEXTER 

kids, worried wives and discouraged men; rather it means such and such 
a percentage of unemployed as compared to such and such a percentage 
last month or last year or ten years ago. All human values statisticalites can 
reduce to percentages or charts or graphs. The suffering and misery and 
privation that accrue to individuals are lost in the mathematical maze they 
work out to show this or that result in terms of percentages or comparative 
tables. 

The plain facts of the case are that Hoffman's proposal to retrain men 
forced into idleness by increased imports is no good. There may be some 
merit to taxing American workers to provide dollars to European nations 
so that they can purchase the things they need, but we can certainly see 
none is turning over American jobs to European workers. In the first place, 
almost all European nations have already achieved production peaks equal 
to or considerably above those prevailing before the war. This was accom- 
plished through the help of American dollars extracted from the pay enve- 
lopes of American workers. If we had any obligation, it was to put our allies 
into as good shape as they were in before the war. Now that has been 
achieved, it is time to start thinking of our own welfare. A reduction in 
foreign aid appropriations would mean a reduction in taxes, and a reduc- 
tion in taxes would give American workers more purchasing power with 
which to buy foreign goods as well as to take up any slack that developed 
from a shrinkage of sales abroad. This angle of the situation has never 
been mentioned. 

Talk of retraining men made idle by imports is sheer nonsense. What 
about men in their fifties and early sixties. Could they be trained to do 
new t}-pes of work? We hardly think so. How many such men, too old to 
hire and too young to die, would be doomed to waste away the best years 
of their lives in enforced idleness and misery? In statistical charts it might 
not appear to be much more than a small fraction of one per cent of our 
working force, but interpreted in terms of human misery and privation, the 
cost to unfortunate individuals can be appalling. But even to younger men 
unemployment is no picnic. Retraining may sound simple in statistics, but 
to men whose roots are tied deep to a community, who have a house haff- 
paid for, whose kids are established in a school, it can be sheer tragedy. 

But even aside from these humane considerations, the proposal to yield 
American jobs to European workmen is unsound. It can mean permanent 
damage to our economy, as witness the following observ^ations which ap- 
peared in a recent issue of the Indianapohs Times: 

Malaya is a case in point. This year 25 to 30 per cent of 
Malaya's total export production is expected to come to the 
United States. But imports from the United States are to he 
shaved to less tlian 4 per cent of the goods Malaya must buy. 
We submit that is making too much of a good thing. 

In 1947, our exports to Malaya were worth almost $175 
million. The figure dropped to $71 million in 1948, and to $39 
million in 1949. Import restrictions, now reported to be planned, 
will cut the total well below $35 million. 

In the pre-war period Britain's empire preference policy 
barred most of our goods from the empire market, and Britain 



THE CARPENTER 27 

seems to be reverting to that policy under the guise of a tempo- 
rary relief measure. But isn't such a policy, once re-established, 
likely to become permanent? 

In a nutshell, these are the reasons why we look askance at Hoffman's 
proposal to step up imports of European goods. Hoffman insists that import 
increases will be limited, but, as we have tried to point out, imports do not 
have to be substantial to hurt. If it takes more American dollars to keep 
anti-communist Europe going, let us keep supplying them even if it hurts. 
But thumbs down to any proposal to give our jobs as well as our dollars 
to rebuild Europe. After all, the chief hope of stopping communism rests 
in maintaining a strong, prosperous America. The anti-communist cause 
cannot be furthered by weakening the main bulwark against it. 



What Real Unionism Can Do 

Elsewhere in this issue is a story announcing a new increase of ten and a 
half cents an hour for the United Brotherhood lumber workers in the Douglas 
Fir Belt of Oregon and Washington. This new increase brings to $1.13 cents 
an hour the wage increases these workers have secured for themselves since 
becoming a part of the United Brotherhood only fifteen years ago. However, 
decent wages are only a small part of the benefits these men have derived 
from belonging to a stable and progressive organization. Paid vacations, job 
security, seniority, and rest periods are all advances they have made in an 
industry which traditionally in the pre-union era showed its workers less 
consideration than the average farmer shows his work animals. If any union 
in any period of history has chalked up a more creditable record than the 
lumber workers under the United Brotherhood banner it has not come to our 
attention. 

Understandably enough, the industry itself has prospered fully as much as 
the workers have. Never in its history has the industry been as prosperous 
as it is today. The cut-throat competition, double-dealing and underhanded 
tactics that characterized the industry a couple of decades ago have given way 
to keen orderly competition that makes for stability. No longer are un- 
scrupulous employers able to undercut competitors by beating out of the backs 
of their workers special cost reductions through arbitrary wage cuts, a pro- 
cedure that was all too common whenever conditions were right. In few 
industries is competition keener today than it is in the West Coast lumber 
industry, yet now it is an orderly competition. And workers and emplojers 
alike are benefitting, thanks to the stabilizing influence of the union. 

To both workers who think they can get along without a union and to 
employers who spend large sums of money and acquire stomach ulcers try- 
ing to avoid unionization of their plants we recommend a little study of what 
has been accomplished in the Northwest lumber industry under the banner 
of the United Brotherhood. Both could profit thereby. 



T HE LOC KE R 

To give Brother Hart a chance to cool his brain cells for awhile. Brotlier Joseph K. 
Kohorst of Springfield, 111., and Ye Editor combine talents to present the following hodge 
podge of hard and not-so-hard material. The first questions are the contribution of Broth- 
er Kohorst, while the remaining five are the brain children of Ye Editor. The total point 
value is 200. Anything over 150 ought to be pure gra\'y. Next month old Professor 
Hart will be back slinging them at you in his iisual fascinating and informative style. 

Answers on Page 29. 

CARPENTRY 

1. The plancher is part of a stair, mitre box, flooring, cornice? 10 

2. What is meant by the term "mitre angle"? 10 

3. (a) What is another term for threshold? 5 

(b) What is another term for head casing? .5 

4. In stair building, what is meant by the term "half space"? 10 

BUILDING 

5. Can you name the primary and secondary colors? 5 

6. A mahl stick is used by an architect, a carpet layer, a painter or a welder?_ .5 

7. A vernier is part of a milling machine, an architect's le\'el, or a steam 

valve? 10 

8. Chamfer strips are usually used in form work, trimming windows, or 
flooring? 5 

9. Name the three general methods by means of which heat transfer can 

be accomplished. 10 

MATHEMATICS 

10. (a) The square of 3 plus the square of 4 equals the square of 5. True or 

false. 5 

(b) The cube of 3, plus the cube of 4, plus the cube of 5 equals the cube 

of 6. True or false. 5 

11. What number is it which its double, its half, and its third are equal to 

34? (Tr>' yom: algebra.) 10 

12. In the equation (Area^Pi r^) what is the value of Pi? 5 

13. What formula would you use to find the area of a circle? 5 

14. A perfect nvunber is one which is equal to the sum of its divisors: (viz: 1 
plus 2 plus 3 equal 6 and 1, 2, 3, are the divisors of 6.) What are the next 

two perfect numbers? 15 

BRAIN TEASER 

15. Three cows eat in two weeks all the grass on two acres of land, together 
\Vith all the grass which grows there in two weeks. Two cows eat in four 
weeks all the grass on two acres of land, togetlier with all the grass which 
grows there in the fovir weeks. How many cows then wiU eat in six weeks 
all the grass on six acres of land, togetlier with all the grass which grows 
there in the six weeks? It is understood that the quantit>' of grass on each 
acre is the same when the cows begin to graze and the rate of growth 

is uniform. 25 

16. In carpentry, what is a duck? (P. S. It has nothing to do with the hospital 
version.) 5 

17. Do you know what devex means? And no fair peeking at the answers 5 

18. Now try yom* luck with "fiUistered joint." Would 30U know one if it 

looked you in the eye? 10 

19. If you were working on grillage, would >'Ou be working on the roof, top 

floor, or foundation of a building? 10 

20. There is nothing to the following little puzzle. By a little reasoning the 
answer can be arrived at through simple deduction. A carpenter starts 
out on a hxonting expedition. He starts walking due south from point A. 
After walking three miles due soudi to point B he makes a 90 degree turn 
and walks three miles due east to point C where he shoots a bear. At point 
C he is exacdy as far from starting point A as he was at point B. The 
hunter is 45 years old and uses a ^\"inc■hester rifle. What is the color of 

the bear he shot? 25 __ — 

Total point 200 



THE CARPENTER 29 

ANSWERS TO "THE LOCKER" 



1. Cornice. 

2. Means the angle formed by the mitre cut and edge of moulding. 

3. (a) Saddle. 

(b) Architrave. 

4. The interval between two flights of steps in a staircase. 

5. Primary: red, blue ,yellow. 
Secondary: purple, green, orange. 

6. A painter. 

7. Architect's level. 

8. Form work. 

9. Conduction, radiation, convection. 

10. (a) True. 
(b) True. 

11. 12. 

12. Pi=3.1416. 

13. Area=Pi r2. 

14. 28-496. 

15. 5 Cows. 

16. A weight attached to a cord used for tlireading sash pulleys with sash cord. 

17. A downward bending; as, the bending of joists that are overloaded; a downward 
sloping. 

18. A joint made by means of rabbets cut on the edge of tlie members. Sometimes the 
tongues lap onto each other and sometimes the tongues are fitted to each other with 
tlie rabbets closed with a fillet; a sort of shiplap joint; a groove joint with a false 
tongue. 

19. Foundation. Grillage is a base made of lumber in a cribbed manner for building 
foundations on in quicksand or otlier soft bottom. 

20. The clue lies in the fact that the hunter at point C was exactly as far from the 
starting point as he was at point B. in order for a man to be able to walk three miles 
south and tliree miles east without getting more tlian three miles away from the 
starting point would have to start from the north pole; which means any bear shot 
would have to be a polar bear and therefore white. 

♦ 

25th ANNIVERSARY AND DEDICATION AT BERKLEY, MICHIGAN 

Six hundred of the 1300 members of Local 998, Oakland County, Michigan, were 
banqueted at tables decorated with spring flowers and laden witli food, on March 11, 1950. 
The occasion marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the organization of tliis Local as well 
as the dedication of their new $87,000 hall, at 1949 W. Twelve Mile, Berkley, Michigan, 
planned and built by tlie membership. 

Mr. Ronald Swanson acted as master of ceremonies for the program which was carried 
on during and after the Jjanquet. The large auditorium, which is on the floor abo\e tlie 
banquet room, comfortably accommodated the crowd both during the program and for 
the dancing which followed. 

Among the special guests, who brought greetings from their organizations were Mr. C. 
O. VanHorn, of the General Office at Indianapolis; Mr. Finlay Allen of tlie Detroit Building 
Trades Council; Mr. Archie Virtue of the Oakland County Building Trades; and Mr. \'ern 
Lough of the Carpenters District Council of Detroit. 

Each of the speakers stressed tlie importance of the building of such a splendid home 
for tlie local and the benefits which tlie community received from such a project. 

Congratulatory telegrams were read from Gov. Mennen Williams and Mr. Jacob Kaller, 
who were unable to be present. 

Presentations were made to four retired members for lengdi of membership; Brother 
FRANK STELTZNER, aged eighty, initiated July 22, 1901; Brodier EDMUND H. 
TAYLOR, aged 80, initiated October 24, 1902; Brotlier NELIUS JORGENSEN, aged 80, 
initiated August 27, 1906, and Brother EDWARD ROSELAND, aged 65, initiated June 
25, 1913; and to MR. and MRS. JOHN NAUMAN, organizers of tlie union and auxiliary 
a quarter of a century ago. 

President of Local 998 is Mr. Chester Jacobs, Sr., and the business agents are Mr. 
Clarence Lumley and Mr. Edgar E. Harper. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 



Gbneral Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 
WM. L. HUTCHESOX 
Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis 



Ind. 



First General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Acting Secretaet 

ALBERT E. FISCHER 

Carpenters' Building, IndianapollB, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENS ON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Executive Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JE. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District. O. WH. BLAIEK 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



SLsth District. A. 'W. MUIE 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif, 



Third District. HARRY SCH-WAEZEK 
1248 "Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District. ROLANTD ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON. Chairman 
ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the Acting Secretary 

SPECL\L NOTICE 

We \-\-ish to remind all Locals that tlie 26th General Convention of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of .America v^iM be held in tlie Auditorium of the Cincinnati 
Masonic Temple, Cincinnati, Ohio, beginning September 5, 1950, at 2:00 P.M. and continue 
in session from day to day until the business coming before the Convention has been 

completed. 

We also \^ish to call your attention to the following: 

All amendments to the General Constitution submitted by the Local Unions, District, State or 
Provincial Councils for the consideration of the Convention shall be forwarded to the office of the 
Secretary and in accordance with the action of the General Executive Board will be published in 
our Journal, "The Carpenter," after the July 15th date preceding the Convention and no further 
amendments shadl be considered by the Constitution Committee other than those submitted in 
accordance with the above, but amendments to any Section can be offered from the floor during the 
report of the Constitution Committee. 

Fratemall}' yours, 

ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary. 



NEW LOCAL UNIONS CH.\RTERED 



JANUARY 19.j0 

31S1 Bishop, California 

FEBRUARY 1950 

1703 Penn Yan. New York 

1711 Scottsboro, Alabama 

1726 Laredo, Texas 

1756 Kennett, Missouri 

1850 Chattanooga. Tenn. 

1910 New Castle, Indiana 

1928 Vancouver, B. C, Can. 

1950 Covington, Louisiana 

1979 Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

1641 Naples, Florida 



MARCH 1950 

19S1 Jacksonville, Arkansas 

2003 St. Thomas. Ont.. Can. 

3188 Forest HiU. California 

2031 Ft. Edward, New York 

2045 Jackson, Mississippi 

3192 Malvern. Arkansas 

3193 Jamestown, New York 

APRIL 1950 

3183 Concrete, Washington 

3176 Cascade Locks, Oregon 

2054 Horseheads, New York 

2062 Jackson, Kentucky 



3104 
2070 
3195 
3196 

2081 
2115 
2116 

2120 
2392 
2153 
2185 
2187 
2501 



Jamestown, New York 
Park Falls, Wisconsin 
El Paso, Texas 
Socorro, New Mexico 

MAY 1950 
Pine Bluff, Arkansas 
Ft. Pierce, Florida 
Seeley Lake, Montana 
Owatonna. Minnesota 
Cadillac. Michigan 
Medford, Wisconsin 
Kingsland, Georgia 
Pensacola, Florida 
Warm Springs, Oregon 



^ rt 0.ttntfviHnt 



Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 



They still live in our memory. 
And will forever more 



%t^i in l^tsctt 

Th9 Editor has been requested to publish the namea 
•/ the following Brothers who have passed away. 



ROBERT ADAMS, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
A. D. ADAMSON, L. U. 1976, Los Angeles Cal. 
C. N. ALLEN, L. U. 1800, Shelton, Wash. 
FRITZ ANDERSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
LEONARD H. ANDERSON, L. U. 792, Rock- 
ford. III. 
NELS ANDERSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
CARL ANDRE, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
RICHARD ARZIG, L. U. 1367, Chicago, 111. 
JAMES D. BAHRT, L. U. 129, West Hazleton, 

Pa. 
CORTLAND BEAULIEU, L. U. 177, Spring- 
field, Mass. 
GEORGE BECKEL, L. U. 298, Long Island 

City, N. Y. 
C. A. BENSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
CARL BENSON, L. U. 51, Boston, Mass. 
ABE BERMAN, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 
ARTHUR E. BOOCK, L. U. 129, W. Hazleton, 

Pa. 
G. S. BROADFOOT, L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
WILLIAM S. BURNS, L. U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 
DANIEL CAMPION, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
ADOLPH CARLSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
G. H. CHRISTY, L. U. 1207, Charleston, W. Va. 
N. J. COLLINS, L. U. 1339, Morgantown, 

V/. Va. 
DWIGHT A. COPELAND, L. U. 98, Spokane, 

Wash. 
FRED CORNISH, L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
JOSEPH C. COSTA, L. U. 51, Boston, Mass. 
JOHN H. CRAWFORD, L. U. 626, Wilmington, 

Del. 
JOE O. CRUZ, L. U. 1976, Los Angeles, Calif. 
WILLIAM CUMMINGS, L. U. 177, Springfield, 

Mass. 
L. W. DAZIEL, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
F. A. De MARS, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
ISADORE DOLNICK, L. U. 366, Bronx, N. Y. 
STANLEY DRINSKY, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
CLYDE DUCKWORTH, L. U. 1976, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
MARTIN DYKEMAN, L. U. 51, Boston, Mass. 
FRED ECKERT, L. U. 1407, Wilmington, Calif. 
CHARLES ECKLUND, L. U. 177, Springfield, 

Mass. 
DAN ECKSTRAND, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
THOMAS J. EDWARDS, L. U. 177, Springfield, 

JOHN H. eLsHOFF, L. U. 4, Davenport, la. 
ERICK ERICKSON, L. U. 30, New London, 

Conn. 
J. P. FABER, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
FRANK R. FANN, L. U. 586, Sacramento, Calif. 
WILLIAM FEDORKO, L. U. 608, New York, 

N. Y. 
HARRY FRANK, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
PATRICK T. GARVEY, L. U. 177, Springfield, 

PAUL GEGZNAS, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
FERRY W. GIDDINGS, L. U. 337, Detroit, Mich. 
W. C. GOODNOE, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
AUGUST GRAMLING, L. U. 298, Long Island 
City, N. Y. 



MARTIN GREGOR, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
W. G. GROSS, L. U. 1339, Morgantown, W. Va. 
N. H. HAGUE, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
O. M. HARPER, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
LEONARD HARTMAN, L. U. 87, St. Paul, 

Minn. 
JACOB HEFNER, L. U. 298, Long Island City, 

N. Y. 
JOHN D. HENRY, L. U. 90, EvansvUle, Ind. 
JAMES E. HESS, L. U. 768, Kingston, Pa. 
OTTO HEUER, L. U. 1292, Huntington, N. Y. 
JOSEPH HIZSNYIK, L. U. 746, Norwalk, Conn. 
GERHART HOFFMAN, L. U. 87, St. Paul, 

Minn. 
J. R. HOGAN, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
LOUIS HOUDAK, L. U. 98, Spokane, Wash. 
J AS. HUXTED, L. U. 1940, Kitchener, Ont., 

Canada 
CECIL P. JAMISON, L. U. 792, Rockford, IlL 
HUGH JAMISON, L. U. 206, New Castle, Pa. 
WILLIAM JENCKEN, L. U. 608, New York, 

N. Y. 
PAUL JENKINS, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
H. M. JENSEN, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 
CARL JOHNSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
EDWARD JOHNSON, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
J. H. JONES, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
VERNON JONES, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 
W. H. KELLY, L. U. 329, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
JAMES KINSELLA, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
HARRY C. KNUDSEN, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 

111. 
FRANK KORUSEK, L. U. 388, Richmond, Va. 
LOUIS LARIO, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
WM. LARSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
ROBERT A. LEE, L. U. 808, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CLYDE LITTLE, L. U. 213, Houston, Texas 
E. A. MC MANUS, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Cal. 
HENDERSON MC NEIL, L. U. 1029 Johnston 

City, 111. 
GEORGE MC WILLIAMS, L. U. 608 New York, 

N. Y. 
HARVEY MARTIN, L. U. 177, Springfield, 

HORACE J.'mATHIS, L. U. 1335, Wilmington, 

Calif. 
JOHN W. MAUERER, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
JULIUS H. MEGGERS, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
WILLIAM MICHAELIS, L. U. 60, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
BEN T. MILLER, L. U. 2088, Port Royal, S. C. 
JOHN W. MOLLOHAN, L. U. 1207, Charleston, 

W. Va. 
C. P. NORDEHN, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
ELDRED E. NORRIS, L. U. 1335, Wilmington, 

Calif. 
ALVIN ODNESS, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
OLAF N. OLSEN, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
FRED PAINTER, L. U. 1339, Morgantown, W. 

Va. 
C. A. PETERSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
GEORGE PETERSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
NELS PETERSON L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
J. E. PIERCE, L. U. 515 Colorado Springs, Colo. 
JOHN POLLOCK, L. U. 301, Newburgh, N. Y. 



32 



THE CARPENTER 



^rt ^etnaviatn 



GEORGE POWELS, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
GEORGE PRIBITSCH, L. U. 1784, Chicago, 111. 
GUST PUNDY, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
FRED RASMUSSEN, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
WILLIAM H. RAYNER, L. U. 608, New York, 

N. Y. 
ANDREW REVIE, L. U. 440, Buffalo, N. Y. 
C. O. RINKE, L. U. 98, Spokane, Wash. 
A. RODRIQUES, L. U. 316, San Jose, Calif. 
J. H. RONK, L. U. 316, San Jose, Calif. 
JOHN ROSEGRANT, L. U. 1335, Wilmington, 

Calif. 
JOHN SAHLIN, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
JOHN A. SAMUELSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, 

Minn. 
JOHN SANDRIK, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 
DAVID SARVETNICK, L. U. 626, Wilmington, 

Del. 
LOUIS T. SCHMIDT, L. U. 101, Baltimore, Md. 
R. F. SCHROEDER, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
MAX SILVER, L. U. 13, Chicago, 111. 
C. H. SMITH, L. U. 1768, Jacksonville, Texas 
JOHN SMITH, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
J. L. SOUMMEROUR, L. U. 225, Atlanta, Ga. 
OTTO SOVA, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
JOHN SPENCE, L. U. lOl, Baltimore, Md. 
THOMAS SPITTLE, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 
BYRON STOUT, L. U. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 



W. G. STUART, L. U. 1800, Shelton, Wash. 
JESSE STULLER, L. U. 186, Steubenville, Ohio 
CHAS. W. TAYLOR, L. U. 1207, Charleston, 

W. Va. 
JOSEPH THELAN, L. U. 177, Springfield, 

Mass. 
VAUGHN THOMAS, L. U. 626 Wilmington, 

Del. 
EDWARD E. THOMASON, L. U. 98, Spokane, 

Wash. 
CHARLES THOMPSON, L. U. 87, St. Paul, 

Minn. 
ERNEST THORNELL, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
VERNON E. TILTON, L. U. 101, Baltimore, 

Md. 
WILLIAM D. URBAN, L. U. 2079, Houston, 

TEXAS 
FRED WAHL, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
JOHN FRANKLIN WALLEN, L. U. 1407, Wil- 
mington, Calif. 
ELI AS WELLMAN, L. U. 301, Newburgh, N. Y. 
VICTOR WESTIN, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn. 
PETER WESTMAN, L. U. 87, St. Paul, Minn, 
GEO. WILLIAMS, L. U. 329 Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
CHAS. WILSON, L. U. 60, Indianapolis, Ind. 
JOHN WOHLLEBEN, L. U. 210, Stamford, 

Conn. 
MAX ZEIFMAN, L. U. 946, Los Angeles, Calif. 
BEN ZIVOF, L. U. 1922, Chicago, 111. 



$50,000 TO AID WINNIPEG FLOOD VICTIMS 

To the thousands upon thousands of citizens of Winnipeg, Canada, who were made 
homeless by the worst flood in recent history, the word "Brotherhood" in the name United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America must carry real significance. Meeting in 
Indianapolis while the flood was still at its crest, the General Executive Board unanimously 
voted a $50,000 donation to the Manitoba Flood Control Commission to help rehabilitate 
the victims of the flood. Within a matter of hours, the check was on its mission of mercy. 

The following wire was sent to Hon. Louis S. St. Laiu-ent, Prime Minister of the Domin- 
ion of Canada, by General President William L. Hutcheson: 



WESTERN UNION- 

THE HON. LOUIS S. ST. LAURENT, PRIME MINISTER DOMINION OF 

CANADA 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO, CANADA 

HONORABLE SIR. THE GENERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD OF THE UNITED 
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA WHICH HAS 
LOCALS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION OF CANADA AS WELL AS THE 
USA AT A SESSION HERE IN OUR GENERAL OFFICE IN INDIANAPOLIS, 
INDIANA MADE A DONATION OF FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS TO THE 
MANITOBA FLOOD CONTROL COMMISSION FOR THE BENEFIT AND BE- 
HOOF OF THE RESIDENTS OF THE CITY OF WINNIPEG. YOU WILL 
UNDERSTAND HONORABLE SIR THAT NEITHER MYSELF NOR OUR GEN- 
ERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD IS TRYING IN ANY WAY TO INTERFERE OR 
EVEN SUGGEST ANY PROCEDURE IN YOUR DOMINION GOVERNMENT, 
BUT I THOUGHT PERHAPS YOU MIGHT APPRECIATE THE LNFORMATION 
PERTAINING TO THE ACTION OF OUR BOARD IN MAKING THIS DONA- 
TION AS WE ARE INTERESTED IN THE WELFARE AND WELL BEING OF 
THE CITIZENS OF THE PROVINCES IN YOUR DOMINION AS WELL AS BE- 
ING INTERESTED IN THE WELFARE OF THE CITIZENS OF THE USA. 
RESPECTFULLY YOURS 
WM L HUTCHESON 

GENERAL PRESIDENT UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS 
AND JOINERS OF AMERICA. 



CorrQspondQncQ 




This Journal Is Not Responsible for Views Expressed by Correspondents. 

ILLINOIS STATE COUNCIL ENTERTAINS HOME GUESTS 

Through its president, George Ottens, who was visiting in Lakeland at the time, the 
Illinois State Council of Carpenters on the night of March 11th entertained the guests 
from Illinois now residing at the Home with a gala banquet and social evening in com- 
memoration of the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Samuel Gompers. International 
officers and representatives who were in the area at the time in connection with the 
regular meeting of the General Executive Board were in attendance as were a number of 
other visiting friends. 

In welcoming the guests, President Ottens stated that it was a pleasure to entertain 
the old timers, many of whom knew Gompers personally and worked and talked with 
him on many occasions and looked upon him as a friend and advisor. 

Featured speaker of tlie evening was General Secretary Emeritus Frank Duffy who 
was colleague and close personal friend of peerless Gompers for many years. Brother 
Duffy gave a brief outline of the history of the labor movement— how, why and when the 
American Federation of Labor was organized; how Gompers was first elected presi- 
dent and retained that position for nearly half a century; the great things he accomplished 
in his long and honorable career. When Gompers assumed the presidency of the 
Federation, child labor was widely prevalent and exploitation of both men and women 
by unscrupulous employers was the rule rather than the exception. In his lifetime, 
Gompers lived to see strong, independent unions grow up in virtually all industries and 
humane wages and working conditions result from their efforts. Always the United 
Brotherhood considered Gompers the right man in the right job and when in 1904 the 
Socialists threatened to unseat him, the rallying of the Carpenters around him dispersed 
the opposition. Duffy made Gomper's nominating speech at that time. 

The New Florida Hotel extended itsefl to make the dinner a success. The food was ex- 
cellent and the old timers who hail from the State of Illinois had a grand time reUving 
and talking over old times. 



LYNBROOK LOCALS HELP WORTHY CAUSE 

The Long Beach Hospital in the Lynbrook, N. Y., area is going to serve the community 

as thoroughly as possible. Members of the United Brotherhood have done their bit to make 

sure that such is possible. 

On a recent Saturday, seventy members volunteered to erect a one-family "Dream 

House" for the benefit of the 
Long Beach Hospital in a fund- 
raising drive. The volunteers, 
members of Locals 353 and 950, 
under the direction of Brother 
Joe Schmitt, Business Agent, 
and Brother Charles Sussner, 
who was superintendent, erect- 
ed the six-room house in eight 
hoiurs. 

A local restaurant supplied 
hot coffee and sandwiches all 
day. The Ladies' Auxiliary of 
the Long Beach Hospital served 

a turkey dinner with all the trimmings. 

During the progress of the building, television cameras were clicking and five hundred 

to a thousand people watched and applauded as each wtrll went up. The house will 'bo 

raffled off. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 



READING, PA. CELEBRATES FIFTIETH BIRTHDAY 

Local Union No. 492 of Reading Pa., celebrated its fiftieth anniversary on Friday, 
Feb. 24, 1950, in the Orioles Hall. Music, entertainment, refreshments and a buffet 
lunch were enjoyed by everyone present. 

Business Agent L. E. Ross served as toastmaster for tlie occasion. In his introduction, 
he extolled the virtues of Brothers James R. Schearer, George H. Boyer and William 
Hanuf, the three remaining Charter members who are still active union members. Brother 
Ross cpmplimentes these members and their associates for their fortitude and loyalty to 
the Local Union, making it possible, through collective bargaining, to increase the hour- 
ly rate from 18c in 1900 to $2.15 in 1950, and to enjoy working conditions second to 
none. 

Twenty-four apprentices were congratulated and were presented with their certificates 
of completion, supplied by the United Brotherhood and the Pennsylvania Department of 

Labor. Toastmaster Ross introduced 
many special guests, including Mr. Her- 
bert Kissinger, Director of Vocational 
Training of the Reading School District; 
Mr. Horace Heist, Field Representative 
of the Pennsylvania Apprenticeship 
Training Service; Edward A. Reider, 
President of the Joint Apprenticeship 
Council and the Teachers of the classes. 
Mr. Kissinger made the presentation 
speech to the apprentices, in which he 
stressed the importance of school train- 
ing by professional teachers. 

Among the guests present were Rich- 
ard O'DriscoU, President; John Creagan, 
Secretary; Chas. Shedaker, and Thos. 
Smith, Business Agents of the Philadel- 
phia District Council; Jean Considine, 
President of the Pennsylvania Highway 
Organizing committee; Carl Engel, Spe- 
cial Organizer on Highway; Ralph Lyons, 
Business Agent, Harrisburg; H. Scleicher, Business Agent, Allentown; John Wilhelm, 
Business Agent, Bethlehem; Rudolph Sterback, Business Agent, and Chas. Nieman, Presi- 
dent of Lancaster, Pa. The Ofiicers and Business Agents of the local Building Trades were 
also present. 

A silent trbiute in memory to the late Brother Mayberry Mengel, who passed away on 
February 13, 1950, was added to the affair. Brother Mengel was the oldest member in 
years of membership in the Local Union up to his demise, having joined No. 8 in 1899, 




Charter members James R. Schearer, George H. 
Boyer and William Hanuf confer with Business 
Agent L. E. Ross during the celebration. 



CANADIAN LOCAL CELEBRATES ANNIVERSARY 

Local 498 celebrated its fiftieth Anniversary on Thursday, Feb. 16th, when a success- 
ful banquet and dance were held in the Coronation Room of the Brant Hotel. 

President George Emsley welcomed members and guests, including representatives of 
the painters, plvunbers, bricklayers and electricians. Mr. Emsley pointed out that not a 
single strike marred tlie 50 years' history of Local 498. 

Leonard R. Lear, National Representative of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada, 
conveyed best wishes and congratulations on behalf of President P. R. Bengough and the 
executives of the Congress. 

Brother Andy Cooper, Toronto, General Representative of the Brotherhood, was the 
guest speaker of the evening and in his remarks appealed to the younger members to 
faithfully attend the meetings of tlie Local and fight for legislation which would result 
in benefits to all. "I hope that the people of Canada may never again be faced with such 
conditions as existed during the years 1930 to 1939. I appeal to Dominion governments 
to join with the imions in devising ways and means of avoiding a recurrence of such 
conditions. Local 498 is to be congratulated for the progress it has made during the past 



THE CARPENTER 35 

50 years. Now, more than ever before, it is essential that the unions be maintained, and 
it is the responsibihty of the younger members to carry on the traditions of the Brother- 
hood." 

During the evening four members, with records of membership of 30 years or more, 
were introduced to the gathering. 



CORPUS CHRISTI INAUGURATES "FAMILY NIGHT" 

In order to stimulate greater interest in meetings, and bring members into closer con- 
tact with each other. Local Union No. 1423, Corpus Christi, Texas, has inaugurated a novel 
program which merits consideration. In a letter to The Carpenter, RoUa H. Watson, 
financial secretary, describes the activities of his union as follows: 

"Our Local Union has purchased a 16mm sound movie projector and we have set 
aside our fourth meeting night of each month as "Family Night". At this time we show 
a full length feature picture, short subjects and comedies after which we have light re- 
freshments and then play records over our PA system for dancing, both modem and 
square. 

"It appears that our members have enjoyed these programs immensely and are fast 
becoming acquainted with each other and it has been a great help to our Ladies' Auxil- 
iary. They appoint a committee from their ranks to aid in the serving of refreshments 
and it has meant that through the contacts made they have gained a goodly number of 
ACTIVE MEMBERS. We feel that our Ladies' Auxiliary has done an outstanding job 
in assisting us to make our programs a success and they have also done a fine job in 
educating our women folks to purchasing UNION MADE GOODS. 

Local Union No. 1423 has taken a bold step. Anything that brings members closer 
together and unites them more solidly in a common bond is highly commendable. The 
success the Corpus Christi Union achieves with its experiment will be worth watching. 



ROSWELL LOCAL ACHIEVES GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY 

March 25th, members of Local 511, Roswell, N. M., together with friends and labor 
leaders from throughout the state, gathered at the Knights of Pythias Hall, to commemorate 
the founding of this Local Union fifty years previously. 

Local 511 was chartered on March 14, 1900, and holds the distinction of being the 
oldest Carpenter Local in the State of New Mexico. At the time the Local was chartered, 

it had 17 members, all of whom have 

2^ ^ ^ ~ T^ passed away, although Brother G. N. 

Amis, who joined the Local in June, 1900, 
was an honored guest. 

After a delicious banquet, which put 
everyone in a jovial mood, speeches were 
enjoyed by the Honorable Lake J. Fraz- 
ier. Mayor of Roswell; Brother Charles 
W. Parcell, Secretary of the State Coun- 
cil of Carpenters, and Brother Alex Si- 
mon from Hobbs Local Union, who has 
held 50 years' continuous membership. 
The principal address was delivered by 
Brother A. W. Muir, General Executive Board member of tlie Brotlierhood. He gave a 
very inspiring speech, speaking on Unionism in general and of the United Brotherhood in 
particular, which has become knovioi as one of Labor's best friends throughout the State of 
New Mexico. 

Speeches were also given by Brother John Murray, International Representative; Brother 
Joe Rivera, Secretary of the State Council of Savraiill Workers and President of the State 
Federation of Labor; Brother Earl J. McDonald, Secretary of the State Federation of Labor. 
Brother J. C. Cummins, member of Local 511 and President of the State Council of Car- 
penters. Brother Gene Burgoon, President of the Local, ably presided. 
Following the speaking, dancing was enjoyed by everyone. 

The occasion was a great success and one that the Carpenters of Local 511 wall long 
remember. 




36 THE CARPENTER 

WEST VIRGINIA STATE COUNCIL HOLDS BUSY MEETING 

Meeting in Morgantown March 26th, the West Virginia State Council of Carpenters 
held one of the most profitable conclaves in its history. With all members present a 
full agenda was disposed of in an expeditions manner. 

Among the prominent visitors on hand to welcome the officers was G. Clifford Hough, 
Mayor of the City and a member in good standing of the Lathers Union. Mayor Hough 
extended a warm welcome to the visitors and wished them every success. Other dis- 
tinguished guests included Volney Andrews, treasurer of the West Virginia State Fed- 
eration, Thurmond L, Radford, president of the Building Trades Council, and O. Wm. 
Blaier, General Executive Board Member. All delivered interesting talks, especially 
Board Member Blaier who presented a good deal of useful information regarding the 
United Brotherhood and the carpentry trade. 

Among the business transacted by the meeting was a vigorous protest over the use 
of non-union labor on the Star City Boulevard and certain bridge projects. The Council 
endorsed a four-year medical school for the state university and adopted a resolution 
urging all union members to vote for their friends and against their enemies at the 
primaries. The chairman appointed a committee to work with the contractors association 
to draft a state building code in order to promote safety in construction and to protect 
all concerned from gyp building and wage chiselling. The chair also appointed a 
committee to work out ways and means among affiliated locals for facilitating the moving 
of millwrights and millwright apprentices from area to area in order that they might 
follow their line of work more easily. By the time all the business was disposed of, the 
visitors were ready to start home secure in the knowledge that their time was very 
profitably spent. 



RACINE HONORS GRADUATING APPRENTICES 

Fifty-five Racine, Wisconsin young men, twenty-two of whom are members of Local 
Union No. 91, were honored Tuesday night, February 14th at a dinner in Memorial Hall 
marking the official completion of their apprenticeship training. 

The dinner was jointly spon- 
sored by the Building Trades 
Employers' Association of 
Racine and the Racine Build- 
ing and Construction Trades 
Council. 

M. M. Hanson, assistant di- 
rector of the bureau of appren- 
ticeship of the U. S. depart- 
ment of labor, spoke on the 
progress of apprenticeship in 
the construction industry. He 
pointed to 55 journeymen train- 
ed by the Racine program as 
tlie dividends resulting from 
the joint efforts of labor, man- 
agement, apprentices, the apprentice bureau and the Vocational School. 

Congratulations were extended to the graduates by George Nelson on behalf of the 
Racine contractors and by Peter T. Schoemann, president of the Milwaukee Building 
and Construction Trades Council, on behalf of the building trades unions. 

Lester G. Kieffer, one of the graduating apprentices, extended the thanks of his 
group to the joint committee, the employers, the other journeymen and to the Vocational 
School instructors. 

The Industrial Commission apprenticeship diplomas were distributed by Walter F. 
Simon, director of apprenticeship for the Wisconsin Industrial Commission, and Silas 
V. Moote, field representative of the U. S. Department of Labor, bureau of apprenticeship. 

Carpenters and Joiners Journeymen certificates were distributed by Walter Dunn, 
international representative of the carpenters union, Rex Fransway distributed the 
electrical industry diplomas and Chip Ebert distributed tlie bricklayers citations. 

John Grant, secretary of the Racine Building and Construction Trades Council, was 
chairman and George Nelson, co-chairman. W. C. (Tex) Reynolds was master of ceremonies. 




r 



THE CARPENTER 



37 



IOWA STATE COUNCIL'S 36th ANNUAL CONVENTION 

The 36th Annual Convention of tlie Iowa State Council of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America was held at Ottumwa, Iowa, on April 12 and 14, 1950. 

The local unions in Iowa were well represented and fraternal delegates from 
Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois and Kansas State Council were in attendance. 

Local Union No. 767 of Ottumwa, Iowa celebrated its 50th Anniversary of the char- 
tering of that local union in conjunction with the Convention of the Iowa State Council. 

The convention committee of the local union and the ladies auxiliary completed 
elaborate plans for the entertainment of the delegates and their wives. The delegates 
to the convention, the members of Local Union No. 767 and their wives were entertained 




Seated: S. P. McKenzy, Marshalltown, Secretary-Treasurer; O. F. Sellers, Marshalltown, 
President; C. L. Fulton, Sioux City, Vice-President. 

Standing, Board Members: L. M. Blitsch, Waterloo; W. R. Traver, Blue Grass; C. E. Pittman, 
Morning Sun; V. I. Morehead, Sioux City; W. E. Shay, Des Moines; W. O. Brown, Council 
Bluffs; H. P. Schmidt, Ottumwa; R. D. Hesley, Fort Dodge. 

by a banquet, floor show and dance on the evening of April 13tli. 175 guests attended 
the banquet and many more were present for the showing of the motion pictures of our 
Home at Lakeland, Florida, and the International Office in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

The Delegates presented Local Union No. 767 with a black walnut Conference Chair 
and an Electric Wall Clock, to be used in the Meeting Hall of the Local Union, as a 
token of their 50th Anniversary and for being Hosts to the State Council Convention, 

Muscatine, Iowa, will be the Host for the State Council Convention in 1951. 



EVERETT, WASH., CELEBRATES GOLDEN JUBILEE 

Some 500 members, friends and guests lilled Normanna Hall, Everett, Washington, 
to capacity on the night of April 28th when Local Union No. 562 celebrated its golden 
jubilee. Despite tlie huge crowd, a fine dinner was served to all in less tlian an hour. 

Royce Yeomans, President of Local 562, who was master of ceremonies introduced 
Brother L. L. Helland, the only living charter member residing in Everett, and present- 
ed him with a 50 year Membership Pin. Mrs. Helland was also introduced and presented 
with a bouquet. 

A letter was read from Brother Harry Chapman, tlie other living charter member. 
Harry who resides in California said he was unable to be present owing to poor health. 
He sent his best wishes. A fifty-year membership pin has been sent to Brotlier Chapman. 

President Yeomans introduced A. F. of L. Organizer, John S. Thornbtirn; International 
Representative Walter S. Hankins; Nelson Lowe, President of Washington State Council 
of Carpenters; Brother Fisher, Secretary of Seattle District Council of Carpenters; Sid 
Hansen, former B. A, of the Seattle District Council of Carpenters; and otlier visitors 
from Seattle, Tacoma, and other places. 

A. F. of L. Organizer, John S. Thornburn congratulated the Local on its good record 
and expressed the greetings of President WiUiam Green. 



38 T H E C A R P E X T E R 

IritemaMcnal Representative Walter S. Hankins brought the greetings of General 
President. Williain L. Hutcheson, who was tmable to be present. 

Xelscr. L ve. President of the State Council of Carpenters also spoke briefly. 

H. G. ^^.'i]:er. Treasurer of Loc-al 562. gave a brief history of the Local and its 
acti^-ities during the past 50 years. 

• 

LOCAL UMON 246 PAYS TKIBUTE TO ITS YETS 

In 'keevin'Z v.-^t?. .-. vi—y-yfir cl£ -.r,^d:T::r., Lzzil Union No. 246, New York City, 
recer.t'y ■ :r.:rvd ::_- " vTt: r : . :::' :_; v/ : 5i'' 5er :;e in either World War I or World 
\\'^ II •■:::-: i z?.l:-. z -^—y \r.d 5:::^: rVrr^r.-. Av.iy back after the close of World War I, 
Fir. r. :-_ Srirri^ry Gm- D.^rristadt conceived the idea of honoring the veterans among 
t^.T . .vi.. rr; .iy " ::/. i syriirJ night. The first party veas such a success that it became 
an inr.Mil ifr^ir ' il. "_.v un: n, So active has been Brother Darmstadt in promoting 
thr v,r-r;.rr :f ■ r: vr;.r.i ■-::!-.:- ir.:- union that these ariTinal affairs have come to be known 
as Dar:- _:id: Xir :. This years y r: ' as among the best. 

Many g-aei" syrakers were prt-rn: to honor and pay homage to the veterans along 
v.iah added words of praise for Gus Darmstadt for his ^wholehearted efforts in insti- 
tiating an honor night for our respected veteran brothers. 

General Representative Sam Sutherland gave an instructive and enlightening address 
on :::e cenefits of lardonism, and like many great organizers, had some good stories to telL 

Mr. r . ' li y . of the American Red Cross, addressed the members on the value 
ana neieiiny :: re Red Cross Blood Bank. His talk was ■well rendered and a donation 
oi ilOi L J V. =? y en in response to his appeal for the Red Cross. 

President Dcrnnar;-: MandagHo and his staff of Offic-ers of Local Union No. 385 ex- 
pressed the good wishes of tiieir Local Union to Brother Darmstadt and the \''eterans 
present. 

E inneis Agent James Ctmnin^iam also commended Brother Darmstadt for what he 
has dene in behalf <rf the Veterans ■welfare. \^'ith their many years of friendship and 
cooperation, he stated that no man could do more to bring harmony into his Local Union. 

The speakers, the oflBcers and members were thanked for their fine cooperation in 
making this night a grand success; after which aD. were invited to partake of a buffet 
Inndi. « 

0-\L\IL\ D. C. DEDICATES NEW HOME 

In the presence of himdxeds c: n er .ders and a host of distinguished guests, the 
Omaha District Council on Satard^; . Ayrd 15. dedicated its fine ne^w- home at Nineteenth 
and Califonria Streets to the advancement and progress of organized labor in Nebraska. 
The Onnaha carpenters have a long and proud histor\' of unionism. For over sixty-five 
>ear5 d =^ United Brodieifaood has had representatives in Nebraska's No. 1 citjn Through 
all './..- ; ars, tiirou^ good times and bad, Omaha has kept the United Brotherhood 
baraaer tljing. Acquisition of its own home brought to reality a dream of the Omaha 
Disrrict Council tiiat began ■when it was first organized some thirty-one \-ears ago. 

Present at the dedicatory- ceremonies were Glenn Cimnin^am, Mayor of the Cit>y 
and WiUiam Schribner who represented the General Contractors of Nebraska. Both paid 
high praise to the patriotic and fair-minded way in which the carpenters of Omaha have 
conducted their business. Featured speaker of the occasion was John R. Stevenson, 
Second General Vice-President, who conveyed the congratulations and best wishes of 
the General Office. In a few words. Brother Stevenson outlined the philosophy of the 
Unired Eritherhood when he said: "We ask nothing of anyone except the right to do 
tinnr; ::r c-orselves." 

Jr ; - : r d.e Americanism of the Omaha District Council and its affihates came from 
\y- : n.er _i_::nguished guests; A. M. Witzling, president, Omaha Federation of Labor, 
and Gordon Preable, president, Nebraska Federation of Labor. Both organizations 
have their offices in the building. 

Other speakers wer Elmer DoweU, Nebraska AFh organizer, and Walter Andrews, 
Beatrice, President, State Council of Carpenters. The Rev. Francis Belote, Lowe Avenue 
Presb>i:erian Church, gave tiie opening prayer. Clarence Johnson, Carpenters District 
Council president, presided. 

The Council purchased the structure, a former office and warehouse, last year. It 
has been remodeled and decorated at a cost of more than fifteen thousand dollars. 

Besides the Council and its four locals, it houses 10 other labor organizations and 
serves as a meeting place for 40 additional groups. 




McCOOK LADIES USE NOVEL FUND RAISING PLAN 

The Editor: 

Hi! tliere, all sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 568 of McCoolc, Nebraska. 

We organized and received our charter March 1, 1950, with 20 members. We urge all 
wives, motliers, sisters and daughters to join as members. 

Our roster of officers is as follows: President, Mrs. Pearl Stilgebouer; Vice-President, Mrs. 
Roy Little; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Opal Casper; Financial Secretary, Mrs. Mabel Yoos; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Hazel Ruby; Conductor, Mrs. Thelma Ruby; Warden, Mrs. Maude Squires; 
Trustees, Mrs. Imia Adams, Mrs. Emily Swendenburg and Mrs. Howard Goble. 

We meet the second and f oiurth Wednesday of the month in the home of a member until 
we are financially able to rent a hall. 

Since we had no funds, v^'e hit on the idea of charging each member, present at the 
meeting, a dime for her lunch. This created quite a lot of fun and laughter. 

To increase oiur treasury, we recently held a bake sale; also we are planning a benefit 
card party which we hope will net us a good sum. 

We would Uke to see this in "The Carpenter," and would enjoy any suggestions from 
other sister Auxiliaries. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Opal Casper, Recording Secretary. 



FORT SMITH LADIES GET AUXILIARY UNDER WAY 

rhe Editor: 

Hello to all our Sister Auxiliaries from newly fonned Auxiliary No. 71 of Fort Smith, 
Arkansas. 

We have a membership of 15 and have just received our charter and installed our 
officers. 

Our meetings are held in a beautiful hall which was prepared for us by the Carpenters. 

We have elected delegates to attend the convention which meets here in Fort Smith 
)n the 15tli, 16tli and 17th of May. 

I We would appreciate ideas and suggestions from you older Auxiliaries. 
I Fraternally, 

Mrs. W. W. Duncan, Recording Secretary 



FAR NORTH GOING STRONG 

rhe Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 527, Anchorage, Alaska, sends greetings to all Sister Auxiliaries. 
1 Our Auxiliary, the first organization of its kind in Alaska, was formed a year ago with 
;leven members. The membership has now grown to sixty. Thirteen of our Brotliers of 
he Union were initiated into tlie Ladies' AuxiUary at our Januar>' meeting. 

We have had several fund-raising projects, among which were two bingo parties, a 
)ake sale and refreshments sale at the benefit dance given by tlie Carpenters' Local to 
aise fvmds to help finance tlie new Carpenters' Hall. 

We have a committee that takes care of sending cards and flowers to the sick. 

Fraternally, 
I Ellen Curtiss, PubKcity Agent. 



40 THECARPEXTER 

BUFFALO LADIES EN'JOY \L\XY FINE E\"ENTS 
The Editor: 

Le.dies' Av.Tiliar}- Xo. 125 of Buffalo, Xew York, takes this opportumt>- to say "Hello" 
to all Sister Auxiliaries and to extend a cordial in\'itation for ^lsits or correspondence 
vn^ vs. 

We meet on the fourdi Thursday of each month at Carpenters' Hall. 

Our annual banquet, which is held in March with our husbands as guests, is a really- 
grand affair. 

Ehiring the summer, our family picnic with entertainment for children and adults is 
eagerly anticipated. 

We have our in^romptu parties for raising funds and a dark horse and blanket club 
are regvilar items of our monthly meetings. 

Our Christmas party, with exchange of gifts, decorations and special buffet supper, is 
financed by Christmas stocking offerings, starting at one cent to twelve cents, acciimulative 
monthly. 

We remember tiie local men at Lakeland, Florida, at Christmas. 

Recently our A uxili ary attended a local breakfast radio broadcast and as winning con- 
testant, our President Rosalie ^IcCoy, had the opportunitj' of broadcasting one of our ainn; 
—■"the purchase at Union-made goods." 

Fraternally, 

Helen M. Hanssel, Recording Secretary. 



TEX.ARK\XA LADIES FORM AUXLLLARY 
The Editor: 

On May 4, 1950, Mr. JoVq Howat, of Shreveport, Louisiana, came to Texarkana, Texas, 
to in^ ran the charter of the newly organized A uxi l ia ry' Xo. 576. 

Mr. Howat was certainly splendid and the laxhes received him w^arm-heartedly. The 
information which he gave to us on organizing was gratefully received since we are just 
a beginner. Meedless to say, \Fe truly appreaate the time and effort he spent on preparing 
£or this occasion. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Jack Tallant, Secretar>? and Reporter 



MADISOX AUXILL\EY SUPPORTS \L\XY WORTHY CAUSES 
The Editor: 

Greetings to all Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 430, Madison, Wisconsin. 

We were organized X'ovember 3, 1944, and now have a membership of about 95 mem- 
bers. 

We meet everj' second and fourth Wednesday at the Labor Temple. The first is a 
social evening, the second a business meeting. After each meeting, we ser^e a lundi to 
which the men are in\ited. 

At one of our first meetings, we had a kitchen shower. Eadi member brought kitchen 
ntensik, dish towels, etc. The men of Local 314 built cupboards for their storage. 

The Hattie Dunn Memorial Fund is our birthday club, which is named in memory ol 
oiu- oldest, and also one of our best-loved charter members. Each month, those ha\ing 
birthda>-s, c-ontribute one penny for each year of their age. We have contributed to many; 
worth\rhile charities from this fund. To mention a few— Cancer Research, Heart Associa- 
tion, Crippled Children, and European ReUef . 

Our Sunshine Fund is for cards, handkerchiefs, and plants for oiu" members who are ilLf 

Tw^o of our most interesting projects this year have been making layettes for need}' 
famihes for the Visiting Nurses' Association and cancer dressings and slings for a local' 
hospital. 

Each year, we cooperate with the men in staging a Christmas pariy^ for the childre 
We also have several card parties, help the men with their anmial picnic for the familie: 
and with the Labor Day parade. 

We read "The Carpenter," and enjo>- hearing about the acti^"ities of other Auxiharies. 

Fraternally. 

Mrs. Mar>- J. Ehoshan, Recording Secretar>- 



THE CARPENTER 41 

GARY LADIES HOLD 3rd ANNIVERSARY PARTY 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 471, Gary, Indiana, held its 3rd Anniversary party on Thursday, 
April 20, 1950, at the Labor Temple. 

Bunco was played and prizes were won by Mrs. Hugh Washburn, Mrs. Earl Wilson 
and Mrs. Edward Fliegle. Door prizes were won by Mr. and Mrs. Frank Schwartz. 

A buffet lunch was served. A tliree-tiered birthday cake, topped with three candles, was 
placed in the center of the attractively decorated table. The husbands of the members were 
invited in for refreshments after their meeting. 

The regular business meetings are held the first Thursday of each month at the Labor 
Temple and on the third Thursday, a social meeting is held. 

Fraternally, 

Mrs. Zelva Jarabek, Recording Secretary' 
• 

SACRAMENTO AUXILIARY ROUNDS OUT 20 ACTIVE YEARS 

The Editor: 

Hello to all our Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary 240 of Sacramento, Calif. 

We are just a small group, but hope to get more members as time goes by. 

Our meetings our held in different homes of the members on the first and third Friday 
of each month. On the third Friday, we serve refreshments to our husbands. 

We have made two quilts. On one of them is inscribed the names of almost all the 
Auxiliary ladies and their husbands. We have also made dish towels, tea towels, pillow 
cases and aprons. Now we are planning a card party for the last of this month. 

On the 29th of April, we had our 20th birthday dinner which was well attended. Our 
master of ceremonies was Brother Ted Westerman who called on all the officers for a short 
speech. We were honored in having eleven charter members with us. At the close of the 
evening, we raffled off our Friendship quilt. This was won by one of our members. 

We would like to exchange letters and ideas with our Sister Auxiliaries. 

Fraternally, 

Ida Bryan, Publicity Chairman 



HERMISTON AUXILIARY KEEPS ACTIVE 

The Editor: 

Greetings to all our Sister Auxiliaries from Auxiliary No. 429 of Hermiston, Oregon. 
We have had quite a bit of fun during the past year. First, we had a Christmas party 
and a big dinner for the carpenters and their families. Then, we rafHed off some cakes, 
donating the proceeds to the March of Dimes. 

We would appreciate hearing from other Auxiliaries. 

Fraternally, 

Florence Russell, Recording Secretary. 



SPRINGFIELD, MO., AUXILIARY CELEBRATES 5th BIRTHDAY 

iThe Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 431, Springfield, Missouri, sends greetings to all Sister Avixiliaries, 
and special greetings to Jefferson City, Kansas City and St. Louis. 

It has been several years since we have made a report on our members. 
In November, 1949, we celebrated our fifth anniversary. Carpenters' Local 978 gave 
r us a wonderful dinner, prepared and served by some of tlieir members. A year ago, they 
fgave us a beautiful, modern kitchen for which we are so grateful and very proud. 
! Last September, we met at Bennett Springs, Mo., with some of the Jefferson City 
■ladies and their families. We had a grand picnic and got better acquainted with our "up- 
state" sisters. 

We are doing the usual tilings to keep our treasury in funds— pie suppers, bake sales, 
rummage sales. We also make aprons and sell them at every opportunity. 

We will be happy to hear from some of our Sister Auxiliaries in far-awa>- places. 

Fraternally, 

LaVerne Paulv, Recording Secretary. 



Craft ProblQms 




Carpentry 

By H. H. Siegele. 
LESSON 261 
Backing Hips and Valleys.— Every roof 
framer should know how to back hip and 
valley rafters. In practice, however, the 
backing is usually omitted. This is especial- 
ly true when the rafters are made of what is 
called 2-incli stuff. But since no one can 
tell in advance what the requirements will 
be on the next job, the roof framer should 
be prepared to master anything that he 
might be called on to do, and that includes 
backing hip and valley rafters. 





.^ 


Jl 






/ / 
/ / 
/ / 

/ / // 
/ / // 

/ 1/ 


\; 


?^:----. 




^ 


b 


2! 


^1 

''w 




> 


' 



u 



Fig. 1 



Rule for Backing.— A simple rule for ob- 
taining the bevel for backing hips and val- 
leys is: Take the length of the rafter on tlie 
blade of the square and the rise on the 
tongue, the tongue giving tlie bevel. To 
make this practical, let inches on the square 
represent feet. In the diagram shown in 
Fig. 1, inches on the square represent feet 
on the drawing. This diagram shows one 
comer of a hip roof. The hip rafter is 
shown in triangular fonn, as if it were 




Fig. 2 

lying on tlie side, in which c-b is the 
run; b-a, the rise, and a-c, the rafter. Now 
set the compass at point a, and make a-d 
equal to a-b, as indicated by tlie dotted 



part-circle. The square, as shown, is ap-| 
plied to the right-angle triangle, c-a-d, in' 
which c-a is the rafter length; a-d, the rise, 
and d-c the diagonal distance, or hypotne- 




nuse. The run of tlie common rafter in 
diagram. Fig. 1, is given as 12 feet, and 
assuming that the rise is 8 feet, it will be' 
an easy matter to find the figures to be 
used on the square. The run of the hip 
would be 17 feet, minus. Now the diagonal 
distance between 17 and 8 would be ap- 
proximately 18 % inches. Then 18 % on the 
body of the square, and 8 on the tongue, 
would be the points to use for marking the 
bevel for the backing. Fig. 2 shows the 
square applied to a piece of rafter material 
for marking the backing bevels, to tlie left 
of a hip, and to the right of a valley. These 



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THE CARPENTER 



bevels, which are the same, should be taken 
on a bevel square, with which tlie marking 
can be done conveniently. 

Another Backing Method.— Fig. 3 shows 
another way to get the bevel for backing 
hips and valleys. The diagram again shows 



^"-y 



"•^ ■^^ ' 



ii 

/ / I \ V 

I ' \ \\ 



/ / 
/ / 

/ ' I 



12, on the body of the square, and point X 
on the tongue, the latter gives the bevel. 

Fig. 4 shows, to the left, a cross section 
of a rafter timber with a dotted line through 
the center. At tlie center, by dotted line 
squares, is shown how the square is ap- 
phed to the center line to get tlie two bevels 
for the backing. The points used on these 
apphcations are the same as tliose shown 
by square No. 2, Fig. 3. To the right the 
backing is shown with the square removed. 

Backing for Irregular Pitch Hips and 
Valleys.— Fig. 5 shows a diagram of an 
irregular pitch hip rafter on the side, re- 
presented by the triangle c-b-a. Now draw 
h-i at a right angle to c-a, and d-e at right 
angles to c-b, crossing point i. With a 
compass set at point i, make i-g equal to 



^ 



V-i 



I 

Fig. 4 



a corner of a hip roof with the hip rafter 
lying on the side. Here c-d gives tlie run; 
d-e, tlie rise, and e-c the rafter length. Now 
draw f-d at a right angle to tlie rafter line, 
and with a compass set at d, make d-g 
equal to d-f. At right angles to c-d, draw 
a-b, crossing point d. Join points a and b 
widi point g, as shown by dotted lines. 
The be\'els for the backing, which are again 
the same, are shown on the enlarged cross 
section of the hip at point g. How to get 




•Ha/f Tjiickness of Timber- 

Fig. 6 



Fu/I Thickncj* 
of Umber 




i-d, and i-f equal to i-e. Join point h, with 
point g, and also with point f. The bevels 
for tlie backing will be found on the cross 
section of the rafter shown at h. The ap- 
phcation of the square to get the bevels, 
is the same as explained in Figs. 3 and 4. 

Practical Backing Methods.— At A, Fig. 
6, is shown a plan in part, of the toe of a hip 
rafter, and by the dotted Hnes tlie toe of 
the valley, marked X, X. The main drawing, 
marked B, is a side view of tlie bottom part 
of the hip rafter. Now draw the two per- 
pendicular dotted hues from the plan. A, to 



^C__. 



Fig. 5 

the points to be used on the square is 
shown by the applications of squares No. 1 
and No. 2. For application No. 1, shown 
in part by dotted Unes, take the base of the 
triangle on the body, and tlie altitude on 

J the tongue, the tongue giving tlie bevel. 

I* For application No. 2, take the base figure. 



Those Loose ?w\kA-Ovtt ScxQ^ai 
Can be V\x&A in a Jiffy 

ELREDNE 

DOOR HINGE TIGHTENER 

Will anchor screws quickly and easily 
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Price for 8 tighteners compktQ 
enough for U loose hinges 

^1.00 prepaid; - No C. O. D. 

ELREDNE CO., Box 69,lrvington, N.J. 




44 



THE CARPENTER 



the toe of the side view, B. The distance 
between these two hnes is the distance 
from the point of the foot cut to the be- 
ginning of the dotted Hne that runs paral- 
lel with the pitch of the rafter. This line 
gives the depth of the backing, as shown 
by the two cross sections on the main draw- 
ing, one of which is for a hip and the other 
is for a vallev. The bevels are the same, and 



-Thickness of Hip 




■•Toe o/-Hip and VaWe^j 

Fig. 7 



Tall Diicknejs 
of Timber 



should be taken on a bevel square with 
which the marking can be done. 

A similar diagram is shown by Fig. 7. 
Here the problem is to get the bevels for 
backing irregular pitch hip and valley raft- 
ers. At A is shown a plan of a corner, in 
part, giving the toe of the hip rafter, and 
by dotted lines, the toe of the corresponding 
valley rafter, marked X, X. The two per- 
pendicular dotted lines that run from the 
toe to the rafter plan, marked A, to the 
toe of the side view of the rafter, marked 
B, give the distance from the point of the 
foot cut to the beginning of tlie dotted line 




Fig. 8 

that runs parallel with the rafter pitch. 
This line marks the depth of the backing, 
as shown by tlie two cross sections. One 
of these is for a hip rafter and the other 
is for a valley rafter. Compare and study 
Figs. 6 and 7. 



Different Backing for Different Angles.— 

Fig. 8 shows, to the left, four plans in part, 
of four corners, each having a different 
angle. The toes of the backed hips are 
shown in place, somewhat shaded. The 
dotted lines that run parallel with the pitch- 
of the rafter shown in part, to the right, 
give the depth of the backing for the four 
different hip rafters, shown in part to the 
left. The figures just below the foot cut 
of the rafter to the right, show the same 
distance on the foot cut, as is shown on the 
different corners, and numbered correspond- 
ingly the same. The distance at 1, directly 
under the foot cut, is the same as the dis- 
tances 1, 1, shown on the plans to the left; 
the distance 2, is the same as the distances 
2, 2, and 3 is the same as 3, 3. The dis- 
tance 4 goes to the extreme, and is the same 
as the distances 4, 4. The angle for this 
hip is very sharp, such as is rarely found 
in practice.lt is given here merely to give 
a definite contrast between it and the other 
angles. For the corresponding valleys, the.^ 
backing is the same, but in reverse order. 
Lightly shaded cross sections are shown 
on the part of the rafter at 1, 2, 3, and 4. 



CUTS FASTER, CLEANER 
IN HARD OR SOFT WOOD 



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Racine, Wisconsin 



SUPER 101 BUTT GAGE 

SPEEDS DOOR HANGING 

Light, precise steel 
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3|" and 4" 
standard 
butt hing- 
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to door or jamb. 
Mark with knife 
blade, scriber or 
ONLY $1.00 ea. — ^ chisel. Scratch 
depth with edge of template. Remove chips 
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SUPER 99 SQUARE 

TWW 




GAGE 



Light, precision 
made gages. To 
be used with 
carpenter's steel 
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in laying our nu- 
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stringers, hip and 




ONLY $1.25 pr. 



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CC6, 317 E. 4th Street. 
Los Angeles 13, Calif. 



A. D. McBURNEY 




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when you use a 

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p. 0. Box 561, Hyde Park Station, Los Angeles 43, Cal. 
Free literature available on request. 



HOW TO CUT RAFTERS 



^ 



It's new . . . NOW 

New vest pocket books gives lengths, side cuts, plumb I 
cuts, deductions, for all rafters any building from one 
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and 12 rise. Any one can frame a roof with this great 
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STRINGER LAYOUTS, -f c^-k^kS^ 

Its a simplified stair builders manual; Its a lay out book 
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If you are an apprentice estimator you will want this man- 
ual on carpentry estimating by "Dad Bleam." Is just the 
McCoy for the person starting out to do estimating work. 
Gives costs in carpenter hours. Gives simple and easy to 
understand carpentry mathematics. Plenty of charts and a 
swell value, you will like this one if you want to learn. 
Price $2.00 

STEP BY STEP HOUSE FRAMING DETAILS 

Step by step house framing details is another of the 
"Dad Bleam manuals." It's crammed full of house fram- 
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top of roof. Price $2.00 

Write 

BUILDERS' TOPICS 

1512 Market St. Seattle 7, Wa«h. 

NOTICE— ALL THE ABOVE FOUR MANUALS WILL 
BE SENT TO ANY ADDRESS AT SPECIAL PRICE OF 
$4.00 YOU SAVE $4.00. 



Let us send you this book of 

HOME BUILDERS 
SHORT-CUTS 

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Contents include: 88 handy ways to use tools; 
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on exterior and interior wall con- 
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19 tips on making cor- 
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CARLSON & SULLIVAN, INC. 

MONROVIA, CALIFORNIA ^[^^^r» 




STAIR GAGES 

(Angle Gages) 

The handiest little devices you ever 
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P. O. Box 278C 
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DO YOU KNOW HOW TO 

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AMERICAN Floor Surfacing Machine Co* 
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LEARN TO ESTIMATE 

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NOTICE 



The publishers of "The Carpenter" reaerre the 
right to reject all advertising matter which may 
be, in their judgment, unfair or objectionable to 
the membership of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

All Contracts for advertising space in "The Car- 
penter," including those stipulated as non-can- 
cellable, are only accepted subject to the above 
reserved rights of the publisheTS. 



Index of Advertisers 



Carpenters' Tools and Accessories 

Page 

The American Floor Surfacing 

Machine Co., Toledo, Ohio__ 47 

Burr Mfg. Co., Los Angeles, Cal. 44 

Carlson & Sullivan, Inc., Mon- 
rovia, Cal. 46 

Cedarburg Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 4 

Robert H. Clark Co., Beverly 

Hills, Calif. 44 

Corvtreld Supply Co., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 45 

Wilbert Dohmeyer, Crete, 111 48 

Dremel Mfg. Co., Racine, Wis 45 

Eliason Tool Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 3rd Cover 

Elredne Co., Irvington, N. J 43 

E-Z Mark Tools, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 4 

Foley Mfg. Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 48 

The Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 47 

A. D. McBurney, Los Angeles, 

Calif. 45 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 46 

Stanley Tools, New Britain, 

Conn. 3rd Cover 

Welliver & Sons, Rockford, lll.__ 46 

Carpentry Materials 

The Upson Co., Lockport, N. Y._ 1 

Doors 

Overhead Door Corp., Hartford 

City, Md. 4th Cover 

Technical Courses and Books 

American Technical Society, 

Chicago, 111. 47 

Audel Publishers, New York, 

N. Y. 3rd Cover 

Builders Topics, Seattle, Wash.- 45 

Chicago Technical College, Chi- 
cago, 111. 3 

H. H. Siegele, Emporia, Kans. 42 

Simmons-Boardman Publishing 

Corp., New York, N. Y 46 

Tamblyn System, Denver, Colo._ 47 



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Measuring tread or riser 

ELIASON STAIR GUAGE 

. Saves HALF Your Time 
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FOUNDED 1881 



Official Publication of the 
UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS of AMERICA 



JULY, 1950 







^i;\ B|f4%;. 




Be sure your 
Local Union 
books a showing 
of these two 
United Brother- 
hood films — 



THIS IS YOUR BROTHERHOOD 



and 



CARPENTERS HOME 



552Si7v^^2Si^i^i^i3^v^^i^i^ 



Produced by authorization of the General Executive Board, 
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action and the Lakeland Home taking care of old time members. 
There is no charge for the use of these films. They are loaned out 
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Councils and Auxiliaries. If you haven't seen these films, urge your 
Local Union to book a showing as soon as possible. Take it up at 
the next meeting. Full details may be obtained by dropping a 
note to: 

Maurice A. Hutcheson, 

First General Vice-President, 
Carpenters Bldg., 222 E. Michigan St. 
Indianapolis 4, Indiana. 



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STREET- 
CITY 





THE^C^NTCR 



Trade Mark Reg. March, 1913 



llllllllllllllll 



A Monthly Journal, Owned and Published by the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiner 
of America, for all its Members of all its Branches. 

PETER E. TERZICK, Editor 

Carpenters' Building, 222 E. Michigan Street, Indianapolis 4, Indiana 



Established In 1881 
Vol. LXX — No. 7 



INDIANAPOLIS, JULY, 1950 



One Dollar Per Yeai 
Ten Cents a Copj 



— Con tents — 



What Featherbedding; 



A team of English building tradesmen visits this country to study American building 
techniques. In its report to the English Government, this team discloses that the American 
building tradesman produces fully 50% more per day than does his English brother. If 
this is so, what license do U. S. papers have to rant about "featherbedding" in our con- 
struction trades? The answer is they have none. The U. S. worker produces 50% more 
per day than does his counterpart in England simply because he works harder; and 
English papers are free to admit so. 



Shrine With A Label - 



8 



When workmen recently began tearing down the White House as a preliminary to 
rebuilding it from basement to garret, a United Brotherhood Union Label was found on 
the back of an old panel. It was probably one of the first labels ever issued by the 
United Brotherhood since the last remodeling of the president's residence took place in 
1902. This article contains some interesting data on the White House. 



Hatchetmen At Work 



14 



At a hearing regarding a proposed slum clearance program, a Newark city official 
takes to task the obstructive, delaying tactics generally being followed by the real estate 
lobbies in their never-ending fight to block all low-cost housing. He points out the pat- 
tern that exists in ail real estate lobby activities ^vhenever and wherever low-cost hous- 
ing becomes an issue. 



^ The Great Squeeze 



17 

Throughout the land there is a great deal of propaganda floating around to the effect 
that Big Business has seen the light and that unions are no longer necessary to protect 
the welfare of working people. A look at what is happening in the shipping industry 
where companies are transferring their vessels to foreign flags as a means of beating 
down wages and working conditions gives the lie to such propaganda very effectively 
and conclusively. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Plane Gossip 

Official 

Editorials 

In Memoriam 

The Locker - 

Correspondence 

To The Ladies 

Craft Problems 



12 
21 

24 
33 
34 
35 
39 
41 



Index to Advertisers 



46 



Entered July 22, 1915, at INDIANAPOLIS, IND., as second class mail matter, under Act of 

Congress, Aug. 24, 1912. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for 

in Section 1103, act of October 3, 1917, authorized on July 8, 1918. 



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What Featherbedding? 



LAST YEAR the British government sent to the United States a seven- 
teen-man team of building trades workers to study American con- 
struction methods and techniques with the hope that these experts 
could bring back to England new ideas for upping production in the Eng- 
lish building trades. For many weeks this British team toured the United 
States. It watched American craftsmen plying their trades in many sections 
and under all varieties of conditions. Then they returned home to make 
their report. 

A few weeks ago that reporit was released, What the report disclospd 
ought to be of interest to building trades workers on both sides of the oce^n. 
The whole team unanimously agreed that American construction workers 
produce fifty per cent more on the 



average than do their English bro- 
thers. American newspapers all but 
ignored the report. Naturally; be- 
cause for the past five years the U. S. 
papers have been raving and ranting 
about the terrific amount of "feather- 
bedding" unions have introduced into 
American industry. Had the report 
indicated that U.S< workers were less 
efficient than their British Brothers, 
most papers would have carried ban- 
ner headlines on Page One. However, 
since the report showed the reverse 
to be true by a very wide margin, the 
whole thing was ignored. 

On the other hand, English news- 
papers gave the report a substantial 
amount of publicity. The tremendous 
productive capacity of the average 
American building tradesman evoked 
both admiration and envy from the 
British press. It was unanimously 
agreed by the study commission that 
production in the U. S. construction 
industry is at least fifty per cent 
higher than it is in England. Still 
U. S. papers continue printing tripe 
about restrictive procedures suppos- 
edly being foisted on the U. S. con- 



struction industry by building trades 
unions. Hardly a week goes by but 
what one can read scare stories about 
bricklayers being limited by union 
rules to 300 or 400 bricks a day or 
painters being limited to small brush- 
es or carpenters being limited to this 
or that maximum. Repeated denials 
by international unions have gone for 
nought. All the practical proof pro- 
duced by unions have been unavail- 
ing. The papers still try to sell the 
impression that featherbedding is 
widespread and that the low pro- 
ductivity of union workers, because 
of featherbedding rules, is the chief 
reason for today's high building costs. 
The report of the British commis- 
sion gives the lie to such propaganda 
very effectively and conclusively. 
What the report discloses is that 
American building tradesmen WORK 
HARDER than their British cousins. 
Pretty much the same tools are avail- 
able to workers in both countries. 
Building materials are virtually the 
same. In fact in practically all matters 
American and British workers face 
almost identical conditions. Yet Ameri- 
can workers produce at least fifty per 



THE CARPENTER 



cent more per day than do their 
fellow craftsmen in England. If there 
is featherbedding or union-imposed 
production hmitations in American 
industry, how could this be? The 
answer is that it couldn't be. Feather- 
bedding is a figment of the imagina- 
tion of editorial writers who are more 
interested in getting in a slap at labor 
than in getting absolute truth into 
their writings. 

Virtually every newspaper in Eng- 
land gave the building trades com- 
mission report a big play. While 
U. S. papers prattle about feather- 
bedding, British papers stand in awe 
at the productiveness of American 
building trades labor. Herewith are 
reprinted a few comments regarding 
the commission report which appear- 
ed in leading British dailies. 

DAILY MIRROR 

Here are quotations about American build- 
ing conditions from the report of the British 
team which saw for itself: 

Every member of the team was greatly 
impressed by the spirit of initiative which 
is shown in the attitude of all towards tlie 
work in hand. 

Everyone on a job can be set a target 
which he knows that he can and MUST 
reach. 

Competition is strong. There are more 
contractors than contracts, more workers 
than jobs. Wages are four times as high: 
Output 50 per cent higher. 

Having secured a job in a highly com- 
petitive industry, the American worker is 
prepared to make a real effort to retain it. 

In Britain ten years of short supplies of 
materials and labour, and the consequential 
Government controls have taken their toll 
of the driving force and initiative in many 
firms. 

The discomfort and inefficiency of many 
British house plans are notorious (due to) 
the inertia of the average householder, the 
private builder, the local housing authority, 
and the responsible Government depart- 
ments. 

About 2,000,000 American building oper- 
atives have completed 3,500,000 houses since 
the war, compared with 800,000 in Britain 
vdth a labour force about half that of the 
United States. 



THE EXPRESS 

\^^ouldn't it be wonderful to select a site 
for your new home today and move into it 
in August? 

Or to see a vast public building like, say 
the 42-storey home of the United Nations, 
sprout into completion between April and 
November in the same year? 

They do in tlie United States. This morn- 
ing, 17 experts from Britain who went to 
the United States last summer tell how it 
is done. 

This productivity team— headed by Birken- 
head builder Robert O. Lloyd— has corne 
back here to "sell America" to its own build- 
ing friends in Britain. It has taken on a 
tough job. 

This is why: The team has discovered that 
the difference between builders there and 
builders here is that Americans are out to 
earn all they can as quickly as they can. 

The 2,000,000 American building work- 
ers have many advantages over those in 
Britain. 

American Joe has a motor-car to take 
him to work. Joe as a skilled man, does not 
have to do too much fetching and carrying 
himself. His money is too high to waste 
him on jobs that any labourer can do. His 
job is to build and produce. 

For this he gets from 16s. to 1 lb. an 
hour, according to his craft and the district 
in which he works his 40 hours a week. In 
the. spring, summer, and early autumn 401bs. 
a weeks is not an unusual wage packet for 
Joe. 

Joe's is the best paid of all the crafts. He 
often gets twice as much as a motor-car 
worker. The result is that there is plenty 
of competition to get into building. In some 
districts only one in four apprentices gets 
through. 

If Joe is fired there are plenty of eager 
men to take his job. 

But Mr. Lloyd insists that it is not fear 
of the sack which makes Joe such a speedy 
technician. It is pride in his job. 

"The American worker," say the British 
experts, "has never acquired the habit of 
doing less than he is capable of doing. The 
employer is entitled to his profits. Indeed, 
the larger the profit a firm makes the more 
established its reputation, and the more reg- 
ular the employment it is likely to provide." 

This building team warns us in Britain not 
to be too smug over the idea that wages 
have to be high in America to meet the 
cost of living there. American Joe spends 
less proportionately on necessities than the 
British building worker (call him Tom). 



THE CARPENTER 



Contrast these examples of the time Joe 
and Tom have to work to earn enough to 
buy: 

JOE TOM 

Dozen eggs: 17min. 77min. 

Raincoat: 5h. 48m. 40h. 34m. 

Shoes: 3h. Im. 15h. 13m. 

Radio set lOh. 17m. lOlh. 

Scotch (if he can get it) 

whiskey 2h. llh. 16m. 

Cinema seat: 15m. 46m. 

How have American builders done since 
the end of the war? They have built 
3,500,000 houses, against 800,000 in Britain 

They have twice the manpower but Ameri- 
can Joe produces half as much again every 
hour as Tom does. 

EASTERN DAILY PRESS, NORWICH 

The productivity team from the British 
Building Industry, which last year visited 
the United States, says in its report pub- 
lished today that a large part of the differ- 
ence between American and British produc- 
tivity could be accounted for only by the 
individual attitude towards work. 

The American, it is stated, has never 
acquired the habit of doing less than he 
is capable of doing, and there is so far little 
evidence of a worker group-consciousness 
in American industry. The whole American 
way of life was a challenge to the indi- 
vidual to give of his best. Some new in- 
centive would have to be found for the 
British worker. The British building indus- 
try was attempting to supply that incentive 
by the adoption of schemes of pajonent by 
results— a method which the American build- 
ing industry did not favour. 

The report states that the British operative 
must realize that his standard of living was 
closely hnked to the efficiency of the indus- 
try, and depended upon his personal con- 
tribution. The team contends that the heavy 
subsidisation of building in Britain however 
necessary it might be, diminishes the in- 
centive to secure lower costs. 

At a Press conference last night, Mr. 
Robert O. Lloyd, president of the National 
Federation of Building Trades Employers, 
and leader of the team said: "I think the 
Government and the Opposition agree that 
the time will have to come soon when we 
shall have to sweep away controls." What 
had most impressed the team was the ab- 
sence of control which enabled the American 
contractor and architect to perfect the pre- 
planning of work. 

MANCHESTER DAILY DISPATCH 
The "team "made no major discovery 
which could conceivably revolutionise Brit- 



ish building practice in a short time, though 
there are many points in American con- 
structional methods which, if adopted, will 
raise the efficiency of tlie British industry." 

These points included fuller pre-planning 
of jobs by building owners, architects and 
contractors; better co-ordination of sub-con- 
tracts; more careful selection and better 
training and payment of clerks of works; 
maximum use of mechanical aids; a review 
of concrete quality control; relaxation of 
controls over materials, and prices; more 
energy-giving foods for operatives. 

But in the team's opinion more is to be 
learned, taking a long view, from the gen- 
eral spirit and outlook of the American in- 
dustry than from details of organisation and 
technique. 

The main impression which members of 
the team brought back from their tour was 
that of the spirit of initiative and co-opera- 
tion which animates all sections of the 
American industry. 

There is, they report, "a general belief 
in the need for experiment and progress, 
and these, with the direct material incentives 
to self-advancement and the penalties for 
failure to keep abreast of the times, account 
for the speed and efficiency of production." 

DAILY GRAPHIC 

Sixteen building men, back from seeing 
how the U. S, builds its homes, say to-day: 
Britain does not work hard enough or fast 
enough, and there are too many obstacles. 

The sixteen include a plumber, plasterer, 
carpenter, painter and bricklayer, master 
builders and architects. 

Their unanimous verdict is: Britain must 
get the same will to work and team spirit 
as the Americans if they want to reach the 
same speed in output. 

They will organize meetings throughout 
Britain to emphasise that the building work- 
ers must do all they can to increase output. 

They found that U. S. building men did 
half as much again as British men and said 
pointedly: 

"The American has never acqmred the 
habit of doing less than he is capable of. 

"More is to be learned from the general 
spirit and outlook of the American than 
from the details or organisation. 

"The team spirit of the man to his work 
is the most important factor (of six reasons 
given) why American output is higher." 

The report says wages in the industry 
are four times as high as in Britain. The 
U. S. worker is prepared to work hard to 
keep that Hving standard. 



Shrine with a Label 



LATE IN 1948, the President of the United States was entertaining 
at the White House. The great and the near great from all parts of| 
the world were on hand for the gala occasion. As the animated throngi 
milled about the famous East Room, an ominous creaking cut through the 
lilt of the music and the buzz of the conversation. Conversation stopped sud- 




denly. In horror the hundreds of people looked up to see the massive chanda- 
liers sway and dance as if an earthquake were in progress. Automatically 
people moved away from the center of the room and the party continued; 
but that creaking started an investigation that brought about some startling 
disclosures. 

As engineers swarmed over the historic structure to investigate the source 
of the creaking, they discovered that the White House was a crumbling, struc- 



THE CARPENTER 



turally unsound shell underneath the 
innumerable brave coats of paint and 
plaster. Timbers that were installed 
150 years ago were found to be rid- 
dled with holes drilled through the 
years when running water, then gas, 
then electricity were first installed for 
the benefit of presidential residents. 
Mortar and brickwork of ancient 
vintage were found to be crumbly 
and falling apart. Haphazard re- 
modeling down the decades were 
found to have redistributed the 
whole bearing load on arches and 
trusses that were originally de- 
signed to carry no load at all. In 
fact the whole structure was found 
to be an unsound firetrap that even 
a minor earth tremor might ha\o 
leveled to the ground. 

As soon as the news was released, 
a great clamor arose. Some people 
wanted the ancient structure rebuilt 
from the bottom up but kept intact 
in appearance. Others wanted the 
old structure razed and an entirely 
new one put up in its place. In the 
end the majority won and Congress 
appropriated nearly five and a half 
million dollars to practically rebuild 
the White House without changing 



On the back of the panel the workers 
found an old Union Label of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. Since the 
United Brotherhood Union Label was 
not adopted until 1900, it is assumed 
that the Union Label panel was in- 





Front view as it looked during 1820 

i its appearance to an substantial de- 

i gree. 

' Nearly a year ago the project got 
under way. Hundreds of union crafts- 
men began taking the structure apart 
brick by brick and board by board. 

il During the process an old panel was 
removed from the famous East Room. 



South Front as it looked in March, 1853 

stalled during the remodeling process 
which Congress authorized in 1902. 
As the accompanying picture shows, 
the Label bears No. 4569. Although 
the number is indistinct, it appears 
to have been issued by "Factory No. 
10, Bronx, N. Y." 

There is little doubt but that the la- 
bel on the panel was one of the first 
ever issued by the United Brother- 
hood. At the Eleventh General Con- 
vention held at Scranton, Pa., in 
September of 1900, a decision was 
reached that the United Brother- 
hood should adopt a Union Label 
to identify products turned out by 
its members in shops and mills. A 
committee was appointed to design 
such a Label. After considerable 
discussion, the committee adopted 
a Label of elliptical design. Around 
the outer portion were the words 
"United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America" while the 
inner portion contained the words 
"Union Made," the words being sepa- 
rated by the United Brotherhood em- 
blem. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



HoAvever. this design did not meet 
with general appro\"aL It was not 
very artistic and appeared to be rath- 
er cumbersome. Members did not hke 
its appearance. Consequently the de- 
sign was short-lived. At the Twelfth 
General Convention a neater and 
more attractive design, much like the 
present one, was adopted and ap- 
proved of by subsequent vote. Ever 
since, the red, white, blue and gold 
design we know today has been in 
use. The Label on the old panel re- 
mo\"ed from the White House shows 
how true this is. 

The White House is almost as old 
as the nation itself. President George 



It took eight years to complete the 
building. Hoban was assisted by both 
\\'ashington and Jefferson in the con- 
struction work. They both made fre- 
quent Alsits to the building during its 
construction. When the British raid- 
ed Washington on August 24, 1814, 
they burned the structure, destroy- 
ing the interior and part of the exter- 
ior, The work of reconstruction was 
commenced in the spring of 1815 
under the direction of Hoban, and 
President James Monroe moved in 
during December. ISIT, It was neces- 
sar\- to redecorate and refurnish the 
entire house. The furniture for the 
public rooms, except the East Pioom, 






■z '' " ^mm, ne^^~- 




Washington approved the selection of 
the site for the President's House— the 
"^^'hite House— which had been select- 
ed b\" Major Pierre L'Enfant, a French 
engineer. The site was on the farm of 
David Bums, whose land extended 
southward to the Potomac River. A 
prize of 8500 was offered for the best 
design for the building. Several were 
submitted but that of James Hoban. 
an architect from Dublin, Ireland, 
who was then residing in Charleston- 
South Carolina, won the award. He 
thus became the first architect of the 
White House. The design is said to 
have been based on that of the Duke 
of Leinster's palace in Dublin. 



was imported from France and ar- 
ri\ed early in the autumn of 1817. 
The cost of the President's House 
from the beginning to January' 1. 
1S20 was S333.207.04. Repairs in the 
same period was 8246,490. 

The first bath tub in the White 
House was installed for President 
Fillmore in 1S50. It was not replaced 
until President Cle\"eland's Admini- 
stration. Electricit}" was introduced 
in the building during the Admin- 
istration of Benjamin Harrison. The 
work was completed in July. 1S91. 

^^Tth the exception of President 
Truman's highh- controversial "l)ack 
porch" addition of several years ago. 



THE CARPENTER 



11 



no significant alternations or changes 
in the White House have occurred 
since President Teddy Roosevelt's 
time. Over the years, the White 
House has become a national shrine, 
probably less because it houses the 
president and more because it typi- 
fies a way of life in which every cit- 



izen has an equal chance to become 
a resident. It was a "Union Label" 
shrine in 1902 and will be so for years 
to come since it is being remodeled 
by union workmen today, among them 
many members of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America. 



MANITOBA FLOOD RELIEF FUND 



SUi noor. Great West Life BIdg. 
WINNIPEG, MflNITOBfl 
Telephone: 93S 421 ■ 2 • 3 - 4 



H. W. MANNING. General Chairman 
M. A. O'HARA, Honorary Treasurer 
MRS. GARNET COULTER, Hon, Secretary 



CECIL LAMONT. Honorary Organizer 
MORAY SINCLAIR, Public Relations Chai: 



MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE- H. W. Manning, Chairman, 
Hon. J. S. McDiarmid C. E. Graham Mayor W. R. ForreEler. Emerson 
M. A. O'Hara Mrs. Garnet Coulter Mrs. \V J Shepherd, Exec. Secy 



HONORARY CHAIRMEN^ 

His Honor R. F. McWilliams, 
Lieut. Governor of Manitoba. 



Hon. D. L. Campbell. 
Premier ol Manitoba 

His Worship Garnet Coulter. K.C.. 
Mayor oi Winnipeg 

His Worship Geo. C. MacLean. 

Mayor oi St. Boni'ace. 
Hon. Walter H. McKinney. 

U.S. Consul General. 

MEMBERS: 
H. C. Ashdown 
P. A. Chester 
S. Hart Green. K.C. 
Joseph Harris 
). P Johnson 
J. A. MacAulay, K.C. 
R. S. McCordick 
William Manson 
A. W. Moscarella 
Andrew Murphy 
W. J. Parker 
Forbes A. Rankin 
Mrs. J. A. Richardson 
H. E. Sellers 
Victor Sifton 
Dr. P. H. T. Thorlakson 
A. H. Watson 

HONORARY LEGAL COUNSEL: 
Col. G. H. Aikins, K.C 

NATIONAL CORPORATE 
DONATIONS COMMITTEE; 
Roy W. Milner, Chairman 

Manitoba corporate 
donations committee: 

A. H. Watson, Cha 



TRADES UNION COMMITTEE- 
Andrew Murphy. Cha 



May 26, 1950 



Mr. Wm. L. Hutcheson, General President 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America 

222 East Michigan Street 

Indianapolis, Ind, 

Dear Mr. Hutcheson: 

It was a heartwarming occasion when Mr. J. B. Graham 
with his associates, Messrs. W. A. Welsh, Stephen 
Rubel and R. H. Robbins visited our Headquarters and 
presented a cheque for Fifty Thousand Dollars from 
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America to our Manitoba Flood Relief Fund. The 
spirit which prompted it and the generosity of your 
donation will be an inspiration and of much material 
assistance to the thousands of flood victims in this 
Province, the greater number of whom live in this 
City and whose homes have been ravaged by the flood. 

The whole of Canada and thousands in the United 
States are giving demonstrative evidence of their 
sympathy and desire to help. Nothing has inspired 
us more than the manner in which the representatives 
of the trade unions in Winnipeg have rallied to the 
need and, shoulder to shoulder, have joined in lending 
to this appeal the consolidated support of the labour 
groups. 

This gift, which has come to us from the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, is 
a truly magnanimous donation and the hearts of our 
people go out to you in grateful thanks, 

lours sincerely 



^< 



f (7HAIRMAN 



^ 




tr&ss I p 



FIRST THINGS FIRST 

In a crowded Kentucky bus, a lanky- 
young man sat opposite a cute little chick 
whose skimpy skirt kept creeping up over 
her knees. She fought a constant battle with 
it; as fast as she pulled it down it began 
creeping upward until her knees were again 
exposed. After one particularly hard yank, 
she looked up and met the gaze of her travel- 
ing companion. 

"Don't stretch your calico, sister," drawled 
the young man. "My weakness is liquor." 

And that is about our reaction to all the 
furore Senator McCarthy is trying to create 
about Reds in the government. Having com- 
plete faith in the FBI and the rest of our 
security agencies, it seems to us that Sen- 
ator McCarthy and the rest of his sensation 
seekers could better devote their efforts to 
working on legislation for eliminating in- 
adequate old age pensions, slum housing, un- 
employment and all the other proverty-mak- 
ing ills which create the misery on which 
Communism feeds. 




"These die-hards are trymg the last 
reswt to keep one jump ahead of 
the labor movementr 



ANOTHER PAUP POPS UP 

Then there is also Joe Paup's brother, 
Ancel, who called his girl "Baseball" be- 
cause she wouldn't play without a diamond. 
* * • 
A PLEASANT SURPRISE 

If you haven't been listening to the AFL 
news broadcasts Monday through Friday 
evenings at 10 p. m. E. S. T. you have been 
missing a golden opportunity to get the real 
low down on a lot of things. AFL commen- 
tator Edwards doesn't pull any punches and 
the news he broadcasts is often considerably! 
different from the versions the papers give. 
A friend whom we persuaded to listen re- 
cently gave us his reactions by telling the 
following story: 

A Texas cowpuncher spending the week-: 
end in town decided to go to church. Het 
was very much impressed by the sermon and 
went up to the minister and said: 

"Brother Jones that was a damn good ser- 
mon." 

The preacher taken aback thanked him for 
the compliment and explained that such 
language was not to be used in the church. 

"Well, that may be true" replied the cow- 
boy, "but it was a damn good sermon any- 
way and I was so impressed by it that I 
put $500 in the collection plate." 

The minister exclaimed: "The hell you 

^^" * * * 

EFFECTS OF WOMAN SUFFRAGE 

Ellis Meredith, who once upon a time 
wrote charming book reviews for Denver 
newspapers and is now a resident of Wash- 
ington, was a pioneer in the woman suffrage 
movement. 

Colorado was the first state to decide by 
constitutional amendment that women 
should have the right to vote. Some years 
later Ellis Meredith was at a big national 
suffrage convention and someone asked: 

"Has woman suffrage cured the corruption 
of politics?" In reply, Ellis told this story: 

A man, far gone in delirium tremens, was 
brought to tlie hospital. The doctor examin- 
ed him carefully. The man asked, "Can you 
cure me?" "No," answered the doctor, "but 
I can reduce the size of the snakes." 

"Equal suffrage has not cured the corrup- 
tion of politics," said Ellis, "but it has dis- 
tinctly reduced the size of the snakes." 



THE CARPENTEK 



13 



PROMPT RELIEF IS DESIRABLE 

Although it is no news to anyone who 
has needed medical attention in recent years, 
a sun'ey by a national publication discloses 
that there is a shortage of doctors in this 
country. That the situation is getting plenty 
of attention at the present time is clear to 
anyone who reads the papers. The medical 
associations insist that the present system 
will beat the doctor shortage in a few years, 
while advocates of government planning are 
equally insistent that only a national health 
program can solve the problem. WTiich- 
ever idea wins, we hope that relief is prompt. 
On our last visit to the office of a medico, 
patients filled the waiting room. Some were 
even standing. Conversation was destdtory 
and dispirited. Finally there came a long 
and embarrassed silence, broken only when 
a weary old man stood up and said: 

"Well, I guess I'll go home and die a 
natural death." 

• * • 
OH, NO? 

Entering a room in a Washington hotel, 
a woman recognized a well-known govern- 
ment official pacing up and down and asked 
what he was doing there. 

"I am going to deUver a speech," he told 
her. 

"Do you usually get ver>' nervous before 
addressing a large audience?" 

"Nervous?" he replied. "No, I never get 
nervous." 

"In that case," demanded the lady, "what 
are you doing in the Ladies' Room?" 

• • • 
ROOM FOR GLOOM 

No. Incentive?— Bankers and managers of 
America's big business say there no longer 
is any incentive for investing capital. Their 
complaints are echoed shrilly by the David 
Lawrences, George Sokolskys, Fulton Lew- 
ises and bombastic scribblers and commen- 
tators. 

The highest profit mark in history has 
just been reported by General Motors for 
1949-$656 milhon. That's after all taxes 
and expenses, and represents earning of 
11.5 per cent on sales. 

That is S160 million more than the highest 
previous record in 1948— an increase of 49 
per cent. 

Yep, business is really going to the dogs. 
'No. incentive, you see. 

! It all brings to mind the Scotsman who 
won a Cadillac at a dra\ving. Despite his 
great good fortune, Sandy was going around 
with a gloomy face. Asked why, he repHed: 
"Tis that other ticket; why I ever bought 
it, I canna' imagine." 



STILL OUT OF TOUCH 

Some time ago the President of the United 
States made a short address. The following 
comments are typical of the newspapers* 
reactions to his words: 

A Springfield paper— "The President 
merely showed he is a Simple Simon." 
. . .A Boston daily— "The President was 
ludicrous." ... A Permsylvania sheet— 
"We pass over the silly remarks of the 
President, for the credit of the nation. 
We are willing the veil of oblivion 
should be dropped over them." ... A 
Chicago paper— "He perverted history, 
misstated the cause for which Ameri- 
cans died and with ignorant rudeness 
insulted the memory of the dead." 
The President? Abraham Lincoln. His 
speech? Only the Gettysburg Address. All 
of which, if it proves anything, proves that 
the newspapers of eighty years ago were 
as far out of touch with the common people 
as they are today. 

• • • 

JOE SHOULD KNOW 

Joe Paup, skidrow Doctor Kinsey, recently 
bestowed upon the graduating class of 1950 
the following immortal ad^"ice: 

"Breathing through the nose is very good 
for the health: In addition to helping build 
up your lungs it also helps you keep your 
mouth shut, which w^ill lessen your trips 
to the doctor considerably over a lifetime." 




.4&.-s2SSSs-\53 © 195Q C^/^c StammTz 

"Reducing is easy! Just try living 
<Mi the same ^et your employees 
can afford!" 



14 



Hatchetmen At Work 

By STEPHAN J. MORAN, Director, 
Dept. of Public AfiEairs, Newark, N. J. j 

Editor's note: When the Housing Authority of the City of Newark recently undertook to clea! 
out a slam area and replace it with a low-cost housing project, certain real estate interests op-, 
posed the move on the ground that the site was an industrial site and that its conversion to hous- 
ing would cripple the city. At the request of the real estate interests a hearing was held. Muc/i 
testimony, pro and con, was given, but the remarks of Stephan J. Moran, condensed herein, sami 
marized the situation very neatly. Director Moran pointed up the pattern of obstruction which thi 
orgainized real estate lobbies are raising wherever low-cost housing is contemplated. His remark 
might apply to many communities besides Newark for the real estate interests are determined tt 
oppose all low-cost housing everywhere. 

* * • 

I am appearing here as an elected public official representing the peoplt 
of the City of Newark, in my capacity as Director of the Departmen 
of Public Affairs, which department has been designated by the New 
ark City Commission as the responsible division of municipal govemmeni 
in all matters pertaining to housing. 

The Housing Act of 1949 was passed by the Congress of the Unitec 
States and was a bi-partisan piece of legislation calling for the erection oJ 
810,000 dwelling units of public housing in the ensuing six-year period. 

The State of New Jersey adopted 



enabling legislation permitting muni- 
cipalities to construct public housing 
dwelling units in accordance with this 
legislation. 

The City of Newark, through its 
City Commission, adopted coopera- 
tion agreements with the Housing 
Authority of the City of Newark, un- 
der which 3500 dwelling units are 
being programmed for families of low 
income. All sites, including the site 
in question, have been approved by 
the Central Planning Board of the 
City of Newark. 

At the same time that the mandate 
of the people expressed at the federal, 
state and local level, is being carried 
out here in Newark by the local hous- 
ing authority, we are confronted with 
vigorous opposition from a highly or- 
ganized group, which after success- 
fully delaying the passage of the hous- 
ing Act of 1949 for three years, vowed 



to carry the fight to each and ever) 
local community to destroy efforts tc 
provide decent housing for people 
with limited means. 

There are people who by theii 
actions, advocate the perpetuation oJ 
the slums with their over-crowded 
unsafe and unsanitary conditions, anc 
constantly aim for the continuance ol 
an economy of scarcity in housing foi 
their own selfish gains. 

But, we in Newark cannot concert 
ourselves with the selfish interests ol 
a handful of such people. Rathei 
must we recognize that as of today 
there are over 40,000 sub-standard 
dwellings in the City of Newark. As 
of the present date there are on file 
before this Housing Authority ovei 
20,000 applications from people ol 
limited means who are desperately 
in need of decent housing for them- 
selves and their families. 



1^ 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



Needless to say, with the units 
now under management of this Au- 
thority, this problem cannot be solved. 

It is for that reason that this Au- 
thority courageously embarked on a 
program which would make available 
a substantial number of units to the 
low-income citizens of the City of 
Newark who are desperately in need 
of them, and I wholeheartedly sup- 
port their program, and have con- 
cerned myself, as an individual and 
as a public official, with many of the 
facts which, upon presentation to any 
fair-minded person or group who are 
seriously interested in Newark as a 
City and its citizens as human beings 
and people, could not but enlist their 
wholehearted support and aid. 

A recent survey made by my De- 
partment covering some 675 families, 
showed that they were living in 502 
homes. The survey was pretty much 
of a cross-section of the average citi- 
zen of Newark, and points up the fact 
that on a general average, Newark 
today has a percentage of 1 and 3/10 
families per dwelling unit. 

We have earnestly tried in every 
direction to provide decent housing, 
not only in the low-cost housing field, 
but also by offering encouragement 
to private enterprise. Private enter- 
prise, unfortimately, has failed, and 
is still failing to provide dwelling 
units for people with limited incomes. 

Even in the field of high incomes, 
the record shows that over the past 
two years, private enterprise has con- 
structed only 853 dwelling units in 
the City of Newark. 

The question has been raised here 
as to the desirability of the use of the 
North Newark plot of land for low- 
cost housing, in preference to its being 
held for industrial development. At 
the present time this site is being 
used 4% residental— 17% vacant, and 



35% industrial. All of the industrial 
is not in every-day use. 

Another preliminary survey that I 
had made in my office without a great 
deal of effort, showed that there is 
today over 268 acres of vacant land 
available for industry in the City of 
Newark, and over 544,000 square feet 
of floor space formerly used by indus- 
try, now vacant and available. 

But, I do not intend to devote the 
full time allotted to me today to 
enter into a defense of this particular 
site. Because the issue raised here is 
similar to the issues raised elsewhere 
by local real estate boards as fronts 
for the national real estate lobby in 
a highly organized campaign to sabo- 
tage low-cost housing programs. This 
campaign is being promoted not only 
here in Newark, but throughout the 
entire nation. 

The criticism that they make is 
destructive in nature, for nowhere 
does it appear that they have pro- 
duced homes in urban communities 
at prices the masses of people can 
afford to pay. These objections at 
the local level to sites selected by 
local Housing Authorities, fall with- 
in a national pattern, as is evident by 
similar objections to site selections 
in Jersey City, New Brunswick, Tren- 
ton and communities all over the 
nation. 

Selfish interests were recently suc- 
cessful in sabotaging the low-cost 
housing program in the City of Chi- 
cago, Illinois, and I would like to 
quote from the remarks of Robert R. 
Taylor, the Housing Authority Chair- 
man of that city, in referring to this 
same type of objections to site selec- 
tions which were raised by the same 
real estate groups, and the people 
who for years have been opposed to 
low-cost public housing. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



Mr. Taylor stated: "The most strik- 
ing thing was the confusion and con- 
tradiction in their arguments. When 
a slum clearance site was discussed, 
they testified all public housing 
should be built on vacant land. When 
a vacant land site was under discus- 
sion, they testified all public housing 
should be in slum areas. Their over- 
all strategy was based on confusion, 
misrepresentation and misconception." 

Yes, that group is not one con- 
cerned only with the local program 
there, but is a powerful national 
group. The Real Estate Board pays 
$25,000 a year to a Washington lobby- 
ist, by the name of Herbert U. Nelson, 
whose job it is to block any type of 
public housing beneficial to the low- 
income groups of people of the nation. 
And what kind of person is Mr. Nel- 
son? What does he stand for insofar 
as not only housing, but our Ameri- 
can way of life is concerned? Let me 
quote from an article in the Newark 
Star Ledger on April 20, 1950, which 
states that in a letter to the President 
of the National Association of Real 
Estate Boards, Mr, Nelson stated: 
T don't believe in democracy. I think 
it stinks.' 

And further on in the same com- 
munication Nelson favors depriving 
women and non-taxpayers of the right 
to vote. 

Recently, in the City of Milwau- 
kee, this group held a clinic where 
their representatives from all over the 
nation took a course in how to sabo- 



tage low-cost housing. The course 
was conducted by Ward Blackall ol 
Lansing, Michigan, who had beater 
low-cost housing in Grand Rapids. 

They were told the measures tc 
be taken such as forcing repeal ol 
state enabling acts— or where that was 
impossible, to fight the establishmeni 
or appointment of housing authori- 
ties—or where housing authorities 
were already in existence, to fighl 
requests for preliminary aid for plan- 
ning—to fight against any and all sites 
selected— to attempt to get court in- 
junctions to delay— to institute recal 
action against public officials whc 
want low-cost housing— and to em- 
ploy tactics designed to inflame anc 
incite hatreds, and in short to dc 
everything, even to the destruction oi 
some of our basic rights and freedonu 
in order to advance their own selfisl; 
interests. 

So, I would like to say to you gen- 
tlemen that this in my opinion is not 
a battle over an individual site selec- 
tion. This is a war of the whole pro- 
gram of low-cost housing and the 
needs of the vast majorities of people, 
as against the wants of a few greedy, 
selfish individuals. 

Their intent is not limited to a 
single site. It would have been any 
site or any phase of the program 
where they felt confusion, misrepre- 
sentation or any other despicable 
method might successfully delay oi 
sabotage our low-cost public housing 
program. 



HOUSTON AUXILIARY CHOOSES CONVENTION DELEGATES 

The Editor: 

Ladies' Auxiliary No. 6. of Houston, Texas, sends greetings to all Sister Auxiliaries. 

Our Auxiliary has just had a special call meeting for the purpose of selecting ouj 
delegates to the convention. For this important occasion, our drill team has been busy mak 
ing pretty dresses for the delegates to wear. 

A contest, which we have on for attendance, creates quite a bit of interest among thf 
members. It is comprised of two sides, one called the blue, and the other the gold. Thf 
race is very close, and the losing side is to sponsor a picnic on our 35th Anniversary 
which will be the 27th of July. 

We would be happy to hear from other Auxiliaries and any new ideas or suggestions 
would be sincerely appreciated. Fraternally, Mrs. E. L. Rodgers, Recording Secretary 



17 



THE GREAT SQUEEZE 



DURING RECENT years, a great deal of propaganda (and where it 
comes from, no one knows) has been released concerning the great 
change of heart which has taken place in American industry. Sure, 
goes the propaganda, a generation or two ago many big corporations were 
guilty of exploitation and brow beating and coercion, but all that is now 
past. They have seen the light. They are now as pure as the driven snow. 
Maybe the unions had something to do originally with the improvement 
of wages and working conditions but all that is past. The corporations are 
now doing things, out of their o^vn generosity. They will take care of their 
employes because they love them and appreciate them and those employes 
who feel that they might need a union to look after their interests are silly. 
That is the way the propaganda goes. . 

However, there are just enough sit- employes. However, behind all these 



uations existing today wherein em- 
ployers have free rein because the 
hands of the unions are tied to give 
lie to the propaganda. Last month 
we pointed out the privation and 
misery that exist in the Southwest 
because the huge farm corporations 
are exploiting legal and illegal for- 
eign labor while native American farm 
workers buck the bread lines. This 
month we intend to point up the un- 
happy situation which faces Ameri- 
can seamen because many huge ship- 
ping companies are transferring their 
vessels to foreign flags as a means of 
beating down wages and working con- 
ditions. 

This is not to infer that corpora- 
tions have not improved their hu- 
manitarian outlook during the last 
fifty years. Such is not the case. 
Many of our corporations, both big 
and small, have come to admit that 
employe exploitation is neither good 
for the company nor the country. 
They have come to admit that satis- 
fied employes are better producers 
and cheaper labor than dissatisfied 



admissions of a new philosophy has 
always lurked the power of the un- 
ion, ever ready and eager to do the 
job of bringing about economic jus- 
tice if it is not forthcoming from 
management. One cannot help won- 
dering how much of the new employ- 
er generosity stems from actual big- 
heartedness and how much stems 
from the latent pressure which or- 
ganized labor exerts by its very ex- 
istence. 

Recently a tanker called "Olympic 
Flame" was launched at Sparrows 
Point, Maryland. The Olympic Flame 
was built by American workmen for 
use by an American oil company. 
Ordinarily its launching would have 
passed unnoticed by everyone except 
those directly concerned with its con- 
struction and operation. However, 
the Olympic Flame launching receiv- 
ed considerable publicity. Why? Be- 
cause of a number of unusual things. 
Although put together by the skill 
of American hands for use of an 
American oil company, the ship flew 
a Honduran flag, was owned by a 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



Greek citizen, was documented by 
a corporation operating out of Pan- 
ama, and was manned by a German 
crew, flown from Hamburg. The day 
she went to sea with her all-German 
crew, some 1,450 American seamen 
were unemployed in the City of Bal- 
timore. Five American seamen were 
dispatched to jobs that day. These 
five men signed up for the American 
wage scale of $226 per month. The 
German crew on the Olympic Flame 
would be paid $53.57 a month. 

The Olympic Flame case merely 
t>'pifies a growing evil which is driv- 
ing American sailors into bread lines 
or into search for other lines of work. 
Hundreds of American vessels have 
been transferred to other flags in re- 
cent years and more are following 
suit every day. Honduras, Venezuela 
and Liberia are nations which have 
recently acquired sizeable merchant 
marines through the transfer racket. 
Even the communist-governed Re- 
public of San Marino is coming in 
for a share of this transfer business. 
However, Panama remains as the 
first choice of many shipping com- 
panies desiring to evade the costs 
that decent wages and working con- 
ditions entail. 

Just exactly how many American 
ships have hoisted the Panamanian 
flag on their masts in recent years is 
impossible to estimate since some 400 
heavily veiled dummy corporations 
operate there. However, the best 
available estimates indicate that bet- 
ter than half of the 825 odd Pana- 
manian ships are actually American 
owned. Before the war, Panama had 
somewhere in the neighborhood of 
160 ships flying its flag. The 825 
ships that carry Panamanian registra- 
tion today constitute a very sizeable 
increase in merchant marine strength 
for a nation which has virtually no 
harbors, no drydocks, no navy and 
no seafarers. A handful of ships could 



easily handle all the cargo that origi- 
nates in Panama. 

The Reporter, hard-hitting news 
magazine on current events, in it- 
June issue, carried a thought-provok- 
ing article on the flight of the Ameri- 
can merchant marine to foreign flags 
Regarding the Panamanian situation 
the article had this to say: 

"The shipowners' arrange- 
ment with Panama has mu- 
tual advantages. They pay a 
registration tax of one dollar 
a ton and an annual tax of 
ten cents a ton thereafter, 
which provide this republic 
of 74,000 people with a third 
of its national income. On 
its side, Panama gives the 
shipowners a free hand. Un- 
like American-flag operators, 
who are required by law to 
hire American crews, they 
can comb the world's water- 
front for cheap crews; avoid 
the exacting safety inspec- 
tions required by American 
statute; and dodge American 
taxes. 

"Under Panamanian "pro- 
tection," for example, these 
companies are free to oper- 
ate "crimp joints" in New 
York which generally reject 
all American applicants. 

"One firm, the American- 
Arabian Oil Company (one- 
third owned by the Texas 
Company, which is half own- 
er of a Panamanian company 
called Overseas Tankship 
Corporation), hires American 
chief engineers who are will- 
ing to accept $250 a month 
instead of the six-hundred- 
dollar union wage. 

"The other owner of Over- 
seas Tankship— Standard Oil 
of California— became fam- 



THE CARPENTER 



19 



ous on the waterfront when 
it transferred a tanker which 
was docked in Hoboken and 
told the master: "Captain, 
you don't have to move out 
of your cabin, but from now 
on your wages are four hun- 
dred a month instead of $660, 
and you'll have a Chinese 
crew." 

Shipping is a highly competitive 
business. Apologists for Big Business 
might say that shipping companies 
transferring to foreign flags are merely 
indulging in sound business prac- 
tices by making it possible to pick 
up cheaper crews of foreign origin. 
After all, they could argue, a dollar 
an hour in American money affords 
a German or Dutch or Puerto Bican 
crew a higher living standard than 
two dollars an hour would afford an 
American crew. Did the shipping 
companies maintain decent working 
conditions and enforce accepted safe- 
ty standards on their ships, such argu- 
ments might have a grain of merit 
in them. However, such is not the 
case. The ships operating under for- 
eign flags are often Hell-holes of rot- 
ten food, inhuman working condi- 
tions and sweatshop wages. A study 
of wage and safety standards on ships 
flying the Panamanian flag which the 
International Labor Organization is 
making has been held up twice to give 
Panama an opportunity to get its 
house in better order. This report was 
finally scheduled for release late last 
month or early this month. Of the 
thirty odd Panamanian ships studied 
by the ILO commission, the report 
says: 

"There are no regulations 
to give effect to the Safety 
of Lffe at Sea Convention. 
There are no regulations con- 
cerning crew accommoda- 
tions, manning requirements, 
hours of work, food on board 



ship . . . There are no reme- 
dies enabling seafarers to re- 
cover arrears of wages. . . . 
The crews have no social se- 
curity . . . and in some cases 
have difficulty in making 
good their claims . . . safety 
(and also) social and labour 
standards . . . were found to 
be very low. . ." 
Another advantage that accrues to 
shipping companies transferring their 
ships to foreign flags (at the expense 
of the United States) is the avoidance 
of taxes. The Beporter article touched 
on this phase of the ship transfer prob- 
lem at some length. Said the article: 
"The question of taxes was 
explored at some length by a 
Senate subcommittee headed 
by Senator Warren Magnu- 
son, whose star witness was 
Millard Gamble, represent- 
ing Standard Oil of New Jer- 
sey. Mr. Gamble testified that 
his company owned twenty- 
three Panamanian tankers, 
through its subsidiary, the 
Panama Transport Company; 
that this company had a net 
income of forty-two million 
dollars in the last ten years; 
that no tax had been paid on 
this sum until early in 1949, 
when a dividend of twenty 
million dollars was declared 
by the parent firm. The com- 
mittee pounced on him: 

"Senator Magnuson: 'The 
policy of the Panama Trans- 
port Co. . . .is to allow the 
profits, if any, to accumulate 
down there, then pay the 
dividend at. . . the most op- 
portune business time?' 

"Mr. Gamble: 'That is cor- 
rect.' 

"Senator Brewster: T 
would not be so unkind as to 
suggest that taxes were con- 



20 



THE CARPENTER 



siderably higher in 1944, '45, 
and '46 . . . so that probably 
you made se\-eral million 
dollars on the deferred div- 
idend. . . .' 

"There is no law setting a 
time limit on the accumula- 
tion of such profits abroad, 
or indeed requiring that they 
ever come home at all." 
But there is also another impor- 
tant fact to the problem of ship trans- 
fer; that is, national security'. \A'hen 
tlie last war broke out, the United 
States found itself witli a badly rid- 
dled but highly necessary merchant 
marine. The nation had to undertake 
a tremendous ship-building program 
at great speed and considerable sac- 
rifice and expense. In addition, it 
had to spend the better part of a quar- 
ter billion dollars to train new crews 
to man the 5.000 new ships. Better 
tlian half of these trained men have 
been driven off the sea by lack of 
job opportunities, and nearly half 
of the ships have been lost to the 
U. S. merchant marine tlirough trans- 
fer or sale. Witli the war clouds as 
ominous as thev are, everv thinking; 



citizen must ask himself, where would 
this nation be in the event of another 
Pearl Harbor next week or next 
month? 

In spite of all these things, how- 
e\"er, the transfer of U. S. ships to for- 
eign registration continues unabated; 
all because the shipping companies 
find the\' can squeeze out a few extra 
profit dollars from backs and muscles 
of foreign seamen. Corporations may 
ha\"e changed their attitude toward 
their employes but the propagand- 
ists cannot pro\'e it by the shipping 
companies. The shipping corpora- 
tions are a group that found a loop- 
hole for wiggling out from under the 
necessity of having to deal ^\^th un- 
ions. They are using the loophole 
to the maximum, and all the e\ils 
that the seafaring unions eliminated 
are coming back. Let the propagand- 
ists rant and ra\"e about the generosit}' 
and enlightment of Big Business. The 
thinking worker knows that for his 
ov"n welfare and the welfare of his 
famih', his one hope for something ap- 
proaching economic justice, rests in 
membership in a strong and stable 
union. 



H^soUiiiajt 



whereas on the morning of May 16, 1950 the Grim Reaper removed from 
among us a friend and co-worker, ^-Vrtliur Martel, who for more than 39 years 
served M'iih distinction on the General Executive Board of the United Brodier- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of .\merica, and the splendid record he leaves 
behind is a monument to a life well spent. We, who were associated with him 
during the years past will miss him from our meetings, as will his widow, Mrs. 
Martel, and family from their home; be it dierefore, 

RESOLVED, that we here\\ith express to the \\idow and family our deepest 
sj-mpathy; and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, diat a page in the minute book of the Gen- 
eral Executive Board of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America be set aside and diis Resolution placed thereon as a tribute to die mem- 
or>- of our departed Brother, Ardiur Martel. 

That this Resolution be published in "The Carpenter" and a copy forsvarded 
to Mrs. Martel at Montreal. 

NOTE: Approved by General Executive Board May 22, 1950. 



Official Information 




General Officers of 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS and JOINERS 

of AMERICA 

Qbnheal Office : Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General President 

WM. L. HDTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



FiEST General Vice-President 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Acting Secretary 

ALBERT E. FISCHER 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



Second General Vice-President 

JOHN R. STEVENSON 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Treasurer 

S. P. MEADOWS 

Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



General Exkcctivb Board 



First District, CHARLES JOHNSON, JR. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York 10, N. Y. 



Fifth District, R. E. ROBERTS 
3819 Cuming St., Omaha, Nebr. 



Second District, O. WM. BLAIBR 
933 E. Magee, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Sixth District, A. W. MUIR 
Box 1168, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



Third District, HARRY SCHWARZER 
1248 Walnut Ave., Cleveland, O. 



Seventh District 
3560 St. Lawrence, Montreal, Que., Can. 



Fourth District, ROLAND ADAMS 
712 West Palmetto St., Florence, S. C. 



WM. L. HUTCHESON, Chairman 
ALBERT E. FISCHER, Acting Secretary 



All correspondence for the General Executive Board must be sent to the Acting Secretary 

Notice to Recording Secretaries 

The quarterly circular for the months of July, August and September, 
1950, containing the quarterly password, has been forwarded to all Local 
Unions of the United Brotherhood. Recording Secretaries not in receipt of 
this circular should notify Albert E. Fischer, Carpenters' Building, Indian- 
apolis, Indiana. 



REGULAR MEETING OF THE GENERAL 
EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Carpenters' Building 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

May 22, 1950 
Since the previous meeting of the General Executive Board the following trade move- 
ments were acted upon: 

February 28, 1950 

Wichita, Kans., L. U. 201.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87% to $2.00 
per hour, effective June 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Portsmouth, N. H., L. U. 921.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.65 to $1.90 
(house carpenters) and $1.75 to $2.00 (commercial) per hour, eflEective April 1, 1950. 
Official sanction granted. 

Kent, Ohio, L. U., 1499.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 to $2.25 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Orlando, Fla., L. U. 1765.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.75 
per hour, effective March 21, 1950. Official sanction granted. 



22 THE CARPENTER 

Hinton, W. Va., L. U. 1874.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.62y2 to 
$1.87y2 per hour, effective April 15, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Centralia, Mo., L. U. 2099.— Movement for an increase in visages from $1.75 to $2.50 
per hour, effective February 28, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

March 10, 1950 

Oil City, Pa., L. U. 830.-Movement for an increase in wages from $1.85 to $2.00 
per hour, effective June 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Ludington, Mich., L. U. 1547.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective April 10, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Trail, B. C, Canada, L. U. 2474.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 to 
$1.55 per hour, effective March 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Lowell D. C, Lowell, Mass.,— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.15 to 
$2.30 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

March 14, 1950 
Odessa, Tex., L. U. 2206.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.87y2 to $2.00 
per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

March 15, 1950 

Hudson, Mass., L. U. 400.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.75 
per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Lynn, Mass., L. U. 595.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.05 to $2.25 per 
hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Jacksonville, 111., L. U. 904.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.12y2 to $2.25 
per hour, effective March 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Owensboro, Ky., L. U. 1341.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.80 to $2.00 
(commercial) and $2.05 (housework) per hour, effective June 15, 1950. Official sanction 
granted. 

Huron, S. D., L. U. 1713.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.75 
per hom:, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Plymouth, Ind., L. U. 1816.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective May 15, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

March 21, 1950 
Dubuque, la., L. U. 678.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.95 to $2.00 

per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Batavia, N. Y., L. U. 1151.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.21 to $2.30 

per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Campbell River, B. C, Canada, L. U. 1882.— Movement for an increase in wages from 

$1.60 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

•■ March 31, 1950 

Waterville, Me., L. U. 348.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.75 
per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Greeley, Colo., L. U. 418.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Nanaimo, B. C, Canada, L. U. 527.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.60 
to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

Baltimore, Md., L. U. 974. (Millmen)— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.45 
to $1.60 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, widiout financial aid. 

La Salle, 111., L. U. 1197. (Millmen)— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 
to $1.35 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Deer Lodge, Mont., L. U. 1229.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Prince Rupert, B. C, Canada, L. U. 1735.— Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.60 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 2, 1950. Official sanction granted, vdthout finan- 
cial aid. 

Calgary, Alta., Canada, L. U. 1779.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.40 to 
$1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Saskatoon, Sask., Canada, L. U. 1805.— Movement for an increase in vi'ages from $1.39 
to $1.50 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, witliout financial aid. 



THE CARPENTER 23 

Grand Forks, N. D., L. U. 2028.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.77% 
to $1.85 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Ottumwa, la., L. U. 2300.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.27 to $1.52 
per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Herrin, 111., L. U. 581.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 per 
hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Dubuque, la., L. U. 937. (Millmen)— Movement for an increase in wages from $.94 
to $1.15 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

De Kalb, 111., L. U. 965.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 to $2.25 
per hour, effective June 1, 1950. OfRcial sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Lewistown, Mont., L. U. 1949.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective May 15, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Atchison, Kans., L. U. 1980.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective July 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

April 14, 1950 

Berlin, N. H., L. U. 2276.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
(carpenters) and $2.00 to $2.25 (millwrights) per hour, effective June 1, 1950. Official 
sanction granted. 

April 17, 1950 

Port Alberni, B. C, Canada, L. U. 513.— Movement for an increase in wages from 
$1.60 to $1.75 per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without finan- 
cial aid. 

Orange, Mass., L. U. 1059.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.67 to $1.75 
per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Northampton, Mass., L. U. 1372.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 
to $1.87% per hour, effective April 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial 
aid. 

Ashtabula, Ohio, L. U. 1629.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.25 to 
$2.60 per hour, effective July 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Buffalo, D. C, Buffalo, N. Y.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.25 to 
$2.50 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

April 18, 1950 

Prairie du Chien, Wis., L. U. 394.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 
to $1.75 per hour, effective June 20, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Manchester, N. H., L. U. 625.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.80 to 
$2.05 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Muscatine, la., L. U. 717. (Millmen)— Movement for an increase in wages from $.94 
to $1.14 per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, without financial aid. 

Lisbon, Ohio, L. U. 1288.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective June 15, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Winona, Minn., L. U. 307.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted, vdthout financial aid. 

Tyler, Tex., L. U. 1104.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.00 to $2.25 per 
hour, effective June 18, 1950. OflBcial sanction granted. 

April 18, 1950 

VandaUa, 111., L. U. 2122.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.25 to $1.50 
(residential) and $1.50 to $1.87y2 (commercial) per hour, effective June 3, 1950. Official 
sanction granted. 

lola, Kans., L. U. 2449.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.50 to $1.75 
per hour, effective May 15, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

May 11, 1950 

Bastrop, La., L. U. 2032.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
(carpenters) and from $2.00 to $2.25 (millwrights) per hour, effective July 1, 1950. Offi- 
cial sanction granted, witliout financial aid. 

Chnton, la., L. U. 772.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.85 to $2.10 
per hour, effective June 20, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

May 15, 1950 

Plainfield, N. J., L. U. 155 (Millmen).— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.80 
to $2.00 per hour, effective June 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

(Continued on page 28) 



Editorial 




Not Exactly Amateurs 

Today the wheels of industry are turning at the highest peacetime rate in 
history. More people are employed, more goods are being turned out, more 
profits are accruing to corporations than in any comparable peacetime 
period in the world's history. Still many calamity howlers are insisting that 
the nation has gone to the dogs. Some financial writers and reactionary 
columnists are working themselves into a lather over the "terrible" state 
of things. "Welfare State," "Socialism," and "Statism" are bugaboos they 
belabor day in and day out in their writings. These are the things, they 
claim, which are destined to drive us into the doghouse permanently. Oncjy 
and all, they peddle the same brand of economic hash. 

There is a simple exception, however. He is Frank R. Kent, writer for 
the Washington Star. Kent believes the nation is going to the dogs, too, 
but for another reason. According to Kent, the trouble with the nation is 
that there is too much democracy. Too many people are voting and that 
is a dangerous thing. In a recent column he wrote: 

"An incontestable fact about politics in this country . . .is that 
lying and hypocrisy steadily increase as the voting population grows. 
The larger the vote, the more fruitful the field for the demagogues 
and fakirs. 

"Beyond dispute, this is the basic reason for the cheapening of 
our public service during the last two decades in which the vote in 
presidential elections has gone from 38 million in 1932 to 49 million 
in 1948. The estimate for 1952 is approximately 55 million." 

Kent sings a song that is popular in many Big Business circles. Alarmed b; 
the moderate success organized labor has achieved at the ballot box, manj 
business associations and financial journals are urging businessmen to get intc 
politics up to their ears. To hear them cry, one would never think that ii 
recent years they managed to get the union-shackling Taft-Hartley Law ot 
the books, a soak the poor tax measure enacted, decent housing for middk 
income groups killed, and a host of other progressive legislation buried 
committee. 

It is not often that we can quote one daily paper to refute another. How 
ever, the Toledo Blade ran an editorial regarding the so-called "menace" of 
the labor vote that would be hard to equal. Therefore, we are answering 
Kent by merely reprinting the "Blade" editorial: 

"There is a kind of guileless innocence about the exhortation of 
the United States Chamber of Commerce to the businessmen of 
America to 'get into politics themselves down to the grass roots' un- 
less they are ready to abandon the field to labors active and vocal 
workers in the voting vineyards. 



i 



THE CARPENTER 25 

"In tracing the growth of labor as a political force hy way of 
emphasizing its warning, the Chamber goes all the way back to 
formation of the Working Men's Party of 1828 and brings the move- 
ment up through the A. F. of L. League for Political Education 
and the C. I. O. Political Action Committee. 

"It might have stopped somewhere along the way, however, to 
learn that businessmen have been in politics— down to the grass 
roots' and then some— for many more years than labor and to much 
more obvious effect. 

"It would have found an interesting way station, surely, in the 
era of the late 19th and early 20th centuries when senators and rep- 
resentatives in Congress were barefaced servants of the business 
interests to whom they acknowledged their election. It might have 
studied those days of 'coal senators,' and 'steel senators,' and 'copper 
senators'— days when business interests ruled the political roost al- 
most by default. 

"For that matter, the Chamber of Commerce must be aware that 
railroads, utilities companies, and most other business concerns are 
far from inactive in politics today. 

"It must know that their contributions— pecuniary and otherwise- 
continue to play an important part in the political arts in this country. 

"It can't be ignorant of the fact that the National Association of 
Manufacturers, the Small Business Men's Association, and even the 
United States Chamber of Commerce play an active and important 
role in politics— both before and after elections. 

"In blissfully ignoring these realities, the Chamber may only have 
been looking back nostalgically to those days of which it speaks— 
the days of 1828 and more than a hundred years thereafter— when 
the political field was left almost unchallenged to the maneuverings 
of business interests. But surely this is not in accord with the 
chamber's basic belief in the merits of competition in all things. 

"The rise of labor as a political force within the last 20 years is 
indeed a remarkable phenomenon and, on the whole, a very healthy 
one. 

"The Chamber of Commerce may be well advised in apprising 
businessmen of the magnitude of this new force. But such old hands 
at the game can hardly be represented as embattled amateurs rising 
to the threat of labors domination of politics." 



Sauce For The Gander 

Recently the House Committee on Lobbying activities undertook its task 
of investigating the affairs of some of the major lobbies now operating in 
Washington. Among the first lobbying organization to come under the scrutiny 
of the investigating committee last month was the Committee for Consti- 
tutional Government, notorious anti-labor and anti-progressive organization 
which seems to have unlimited funds for fighting all pro-labor legislation 
and any other legislation that is in the least progressive. However, the com- 
mittee did not get very far with its investigation of CCG. Last month 



26 THE CARPENTER 

Edward A. Rumely, executi\"e secretan.' of the Committee for Constitutional 

Government, flatly refused to provide the investigating committee with 
an accounting of contributions and expenses handled by CCG and its newest 
front organization, Fighters For Freedom. As this was being written, the in- 
vestigating committee was pondering the ad\'isability of citing Rumely for 
contempt. 

The committee is also interested in finding out who pays the bills for 
the National Economic Council and the Constitutional Educational League. 

These reactionary, anti-labor organizations have refused to show finan- 
cial records to committee investigators. 

Joseph P. Kamp, executive director of the Constitutional Education 
League, also appeared witliout his records. He said he didn't have time to 
get them ready. 

Merwin K. Hart reluctantly handed o\'er a list of contributors to his 
National Economic Council but demanded that it be kept secret because 
"enemies of American libert}'" want to smear them. 

The House Committee has been studying lobby activities for more than 
six months. These three organizations are the first the committee has in- 
vestigated which have hidden their records. 

.Aay organization can lobby. But the people have a right to know who 
supports any lobby. 

If, say, U. S. Steel or General Motors puts up money for a certain group, 
the people should know that just as they know that eight milHon trade 
unionists support AFL Lobbying activities. 

The CCG was established in the 1930's by Frank Gaimett, a New York 
chain newspaper publisher. Gannett and his CCG buddies are "back-to- 
McKinley" boys. 

Edward A. Rumely, in the lobbying committee's words, is the "guiding 
genius' of CCG. He has been executive secretary of the group since it 
started. 

-After World War I Rumely was found guilty of concealing a personal 
indebtedness of $1 milHon to the German Government of Kaiser Wilhelm. 
Rumely used the money to convert a New York newspaper into a German 
propaganda publication. He was sentenced to prison for covering up the 
debt, and only a presidential pardon kept him from ser\^ing time. 

Twice before, in 1938 and 1944, Rumely withheld information about the 
CCG from Congressional committees. He was cited for contempt of Con- 
gress in 1944. 

The CCG is one of the wealthiest lobbies in the nation. From August, 
1946, through September, 1949, it has reported to Congress spending more 
than SI. 5 milHon for lobbying. That's a rate of 830,000 a month. 

In 1949 only the American Medical Association (AMA) spent more for 
lobbying than CCG. The figures are: AMA, $1.5 million CCG, $621,000. 

Throughout its existence the CCG has operated behind many fronts. Its 
current one is Fighters for Freedom (FEE). Money-raisers for FEE go into 
cities, buy full-page advertisements in newspapers and then hit business- 
men for contributions. 



THE CARPENTER 27 

Now that the government is delving into the affairs of the Committee 
for Constitutional Government and its front organization, Fighters for Free- 
dom, both organizations are screaming and ranting about the "unconsti- 
tutionality" of a Congressional committee demanding an accounting of their 
affairs. Yet both of these organizations backed the Taft-Hartley Law to the 
hilt and still continue to do so despite the fact the law requires political 
committees within the labor movement to periodically report all contribu- 
tions received and all monies expended in amounts over $10. This shows 
how interested these organizations really are in upholding the constitution 
The very foundation stone of the constitution revolves around equal treat- 
ment for all. However, this seems to be the last thing CCG wants. As far 
as CCG is concerned, requiring labor unions to account for their political 
activities down to the last penny is okay; but when it comes to giving the 
same treatment to mysteriously financed mouthpieces for Big Business they 
strenuously object. 

As this was being written, the House Committee was pondering con- 
tempt action against Rumely. If he continues to defy the committee in its 
efforts to find out who is providing the millions his organizations throw 
around in lobbying activities, he should be fined or sent to jail just the same 
as any union official would be if he failed to report a $10 political expenditure 
to the Clerk of the House of Representatives as provided for in the Taft- 
Hartley Law. 

What is sauce for the goose ought to be sauce for the gander. 



Then They Will Have A Right To Talk 

As this issue was going to press, committees from the House and Senate 
were scheduled to get together for the purpose of compromising differences in 
the House and Senate versions of the new Social Security bill. Out of these 
deliberations will come a measure designed to give retiring workers something 
a good deal closer to an adequate old age pension than the present law pro- 
vides for. 

Better Social Security payments did not come easily. A host of Congress- 
men and other public officials opposed liberalization of the present law. Many 
of them are opposed to the whole Social Security program. They visualize it 
as part of a "welfare state." However, the strange part of it all is that they 
have their own hands out for all they can get. Only a few years ago members 
of Congress voted themselves a fine pension program and they did not place 
an $85 maximum on it either. 

When these public officials who bleat so loudly about the "welfare state" 
turn down their own pensions and other special privileges because they are 
"socialistic" and "demoralizing," they will have some right to oppose Social 
Security. But so long as they keep their own palms extended for all they can 
get, it little behooves them to talk of the socialistic aspects of Social Security 
pensions, particularly when Social Security pensions are paid for by contribu- 
tions instead of coming out of general taxes as many pensions to public 
officials do. 



28 THE CARPENTER 

(Continued from page 23 J 

Binghampton. X. Y.. L. U. 281.— Movement for an increase in wages from S2.10 to 
$2.25 per hour, effective May 15, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Delaware. Ohio. L. U. 1287.— Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 75 to 
$2.17 per hoxir, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Middletown. Ohio. L. U. 1477.— Movement for an increase in wages from S2.10 to 
$2.20 per hour, effective June 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Norfolk, Neb., L. U. 2364. —Movement for an increase in wages from SI. 50 to SI. 75 
per houa:, effective May 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

May 16, 1950 

Canipbellton, N. B., Canada,. L. U. 2539. (Millmen)— Movement for an increase in 
wages from S.65 to S.75 per hour, effective June 7. 1950. Official sanction granted, \\4th- 
out financial aid. 

Carpenters' Building 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
May 22, 1950 

Regular meeting of the General Executive Board was held at tlie General Office, 
Indianapolis, Indiana, on the above date. 

The General President reported that Arthur Martel, Board Member of the Seventh 
District, died on May 16, 1950. after which the following Resolution was unanimously 
adopted: 

Whereas on the morning of May 16, 1950 the Grim Pieaper removed 
from among us a friend and co-worker, .\rthur Martel, who for more than 39 
years ser\-ed ynXh. distinction on the General E.xecutive Board of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, and the splendid record 
he leaves behind is a monument to a life well spent. We, who were 
associated \^"ith him during the years past will miss him from our meetings, 
as wiH. his widow, Mrs. Martel, and family from their home: be it therefore. 

Resolved, that we here\^"ith express to the widow and family our deepest 
s>'mpathy: and 

Be It Further Resolved, that a page in the minute book of the General 
E.xecutive Board of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America be set aside and this Resolution placed thereon as a tribute to the 
memory of our departed Brother, Arthur Martel, 

That this Resolution be published in "The Carpenter" and a copy for- 
warded to Mrs. Martel at Montreal. 

The General President reported fully on matters affecting our Organization since 
the lasf meeting of the Board. The subject matters as reported were carefully considered. 

Renewal of Bond of General Treasmrer S. P. Meadows in the suni of S50,000.00 for 
one year expiring Februar>' 1, 1951 through the United States Fidelity and Guaranty 
Company of Baltimore, Mar>'land, was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Bond on .\ssistant Superintendent of Carpenters' Home, Lakeland, Flor- 
ida, in the sxmi of S20,000.00 tfirough the L'nited States Fidehty and Guaranty Company 
of Baltimore, Marjdand, for one year ending March 10, 1951. was referred to our Legal 
Departn:ient. 

Renewal of the plate glass insurance at 222 East Michigan Street for one year ending 
March 28, 1951 vs-ith the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company of Baltimore, 
Mar\-land; was referred to our Legal Department. 

Renewal of Bond on Chief Clerk C. A. Meloy in the Sum of SIO/JOO.OO through the 
Capitol Indemnity Insm-ance Company of IndianapoHs, Indiana, for one year ending 
April 1. 1951, was referred to our Legal Department. 

May 23, 1950 

The General President informed the General Executive Board of the communications 
received from om: several Local Unions in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 
appealing for financial assistance to meet an immediate, serious situation created as the 
result of the flood waters recently in that area. Our members in the flooded area are 
desperate and in need of immediate financial assistance. Many are homeless and the 
entire cit>- is practically evacuated— and heavy losses have been sustained by our 
members. 



THE CARPENTER 29 

In connection with the above urgent appeal, the General Executive Board appropriated 
tlie sum of $50,000.00 to help alleviate the suffering and hardship in that area. 

Likewise the attention of tlie General Executive Board was called to the earnest 
request for financial assistance in Rimouski and Cabano in tlie Province of Quebec, 
Canada, due to the disastrous fire recently in that area. 

The devastation was severe— leaving homeless thousands of families, and directly 
effecting the lumber industry in this vicinity. 

After due consideration the General Executive Board decided to contribute the sum 
of $20,000.00 for relief in this area— to be proportioned according to need. 

A communication from Oliver Lance, a member of Local Union 1780, Las Vegas, 
Nevada, setting forth his desire to appeal to the next General Convention from a 
decision rendered by the General President, May 16, 1947 and sustained by the General 
Executive Board October 16, 1947, in tlie case of Oliver Lance versus Local Union 1780, 
Las Vegas, Nevada, was read, after which it was unanimously decided that the statute of 
hmitations prevails and so applies in this case. 

Appeal of Robert Bitcon, a member of Local Union 180, Vallejo, California, from 
the decision of the General President in the case of Robert Bitcon versus Local Union 
180, Vallejo, California, was considered, after which the decision of the General President 
was unanimously sustained on the grounds set forth therein, and the appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Archie L. Gillett, a member of Local Union 721, Los Angeles, California, 
from the decision of the General President in the case of Archie L. Gillett versus Los 
Angeles District Council, was considered, after which the decision of the General Presi- 
dent was unanimously sustained on tlie grounds set forth therein and the appeal dismissed. 

Appeal of Virgil Cole from the decision of the General President in the case of 
Virgil Cole versus Sierra Nevada Foothills District Council, Grass Valley, California, 
was considered, after which the decision of the General President was unanimously 
sustained on tlie grounds set forth therein, and the appeal dismissed. 

The annual report of the Secretary was submitted to the Board which was filed for 
future reference. 

May 24, 1950 

Bay Counties, D. C, San Francisco, Calif.,— Movement for an increase in wages from 
$2.22V2 to $2.50 per hour, efFective April 11, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Derby, Conn., L. U. 127.— Movement for an increase in wages from $2.10 to $2.35 
per hour, effective May 24, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Cambridge, Ohio, L. U. 245.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective July 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Vincennes, Ind., L. U. 274.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to $2.00 
per hour, effective July 1, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

Leavenwortli, Kans., L. U. 499.— Movement for an increase in wages from $1.75 to 
$2.00 per hour, effective August 18, 1950. Official sanction granted. 

The General President called to tlie attention of the Board, a report he received 
concerning tlie activities of Labor's League for Political Education, as well as finan- 
cial report from the Administrative Committee. After some discussion it was decided 
to make a further contribution in the sum of $20,000.00 for tlie promotion of educational 
work of Labor's League for Political Education. 

Communication from tlie British Columbia Provincial Council of Carpenters recom- 
mending that an Eighth District be set up comprising several Provinces in Canada was 
read; fikewise communications from several Local Unions in tlie proposed area where the 
contemplated Eighdi District is to be established, were discussed and considered, after 
which it was decided that tlie entire matter be referred to the coming General Convention 
of our Brotherhood, without recommendation by our General Executive Board. 

Request for financial assistance from Local Union 937, Dubuque, Iowa, was 
referred to the resident General Officers. 

May 25, 1950 

Appeal of Local Union 168, Kansas City, Kansas, from the decision of the General 
Treasurer in disapproving the claim for fu